Being In It for the Species The Kolbrin Bible Complete Danjeon Breathing System Home Study System

Author Topic: Our Diminishing Food Supply - Fish, now & for survival  (Read 1860 times)

Ruth

  • Global Moderator
  • Trusted Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 48
  • Karma: +14/-0
Our Diminishing Food Supply - Fish, now & for survival
« on: June 19, 2015, 09:30:19 AM »
www.MedixSelect.com   June 19, 2015 Newsletter
Excerpts from: Toxic Mercury Levels Surging in Tuna

Consumer Reports is challenging federal health officials’ position that the benefits of eating tuna outweigh the risks.
In the US canned seafood is popular, shrimp being the most favored and tuna second. Canned tuna figures in at about 37% of our dietary mercury exposure.

“A 2009 study by the U.S. Geological Survey and Harvard University determined mercury measured in the waters of the northern Pacific Ocean had risen 30 percent over 20 years.”

A new analysis by Consumer Reports health experts indicates that a 48-pound child who eats more than 1.4 ounces of tuna per week — about one-third of a can, or the amount in a single sandwich — could be at risk for brain-damaging mercury exposure. A woman weighing about 140 pounds would exceed it by eating more than 4.5 ounces weekly.

Consumer Reports experts argue these new studies provide compelling evidence that federal policies need to be changed to protect consumers. But until that happens, they advise consumers to take active steps on their own to stay safe.
Among them:
Limit tuna in your diet: Pregnant women should avoid tuna entirely. Three other vulnerable groups should also limit how much they eat: women of childbearing age (no more than 4.5 ounce), young children, and people who now eat 24 ounces or more of any fish per week.
Choose canned light tuna: Mercury levels are lower in canned light tuna than in canned albacore.
Cut back on tuna sushi: Ahi tuna (yellowfin and bigeye) is very high in mercury. People in vulnerable groups should avoid it altogether; others should eat it sparingly.
Make safer seafood choices: Fish with lowest mercury levels include shrimp, scallops, sardines, wild and Alaskan salmon, oyster, squid, and tilapia. (A 132-pound person can safely eat 36 ounces per week; a 44-pound child 18 ounces). Varieties with low levels: sole, haddock, pollock, flounder, crawfish, catfish, trout, Atlantic mackerel, crab, and mullet. (A 132-pound person can eat 18 ounces per week; a 44-pound child, six).
Avoid these fish entirely: If you are a frequent consumer of any type of fish — 24 ounces or more per week — Consumer Reports recommends avoiding the following: Swordfish, shark, king mackerel, Gulf tilefish, marlin, and orange roughy.
Limit consumption of these fish: Grouper, Chilean sea bass, bluefish, halibut, sablefish (black cod), and Spanish mackerel have moderately high levels of mercury.
Eat a variety of fish: This will help minimize pollutant exposures and maximize the benefits of fish, which are a good low-calorie source of protein and omega-3 fatty acids. For most healthy adults, the American Heart Association and FDA say the benefits outweigh the risks of eating two 3.5-ounce services of fish twice a week.

ilinda

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2783
  • Karma: +32/-0
Re: Our Diminishing Food Supply - Fish, now & for survival
« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2015, 04:14:27 PM »
www.MedixSelect.com   June 19, 2015 Newsletter
Excerpts from: Toxic Mercury Levels Surging in Tuna

Consumer Reports is challenging federal health officials’ position that the benefits of eating tuna outweigh the risks.
In the US canned seafood is popular, shrimp being the most favored and tuna second. Canned tuna figures in at about 37% of our dietary mercury exposure.

“A 2009 study by the U.S. Geological Survey and Harvard University determined mercury measured in the waters of the northern Pacific Ocean had risen 30 percent over 20 years.”

A new analysis by Consumer Reports health experts indicates that a 48-pound child who eats more than 1.4 ounces of tuna per week — about one-third of a can, or the amount in a single sandwich — could be at risk for brain-damaging mercury exposure. A woman weighing about 140 pounds would exceed it by eating more than 4.5 ounces weekly.

Consumer Reports experts argue these new studies provide compelling evidence that federal policies need to be changed to protect consumers. But until that happens, they advise consumers to take active steps on their own to stay safe.
Among them:
Limit tuna in your diet: Pregnant women should avoid tuna entirely. Three other vulnerable groups should also limit how much they eat: women of childbearing age (no more than 4.5 ounce), young children, and people who now eat 24 ounces or more of any fish per week.
Choose canned light tuna: Mercury levels are lower in canned light tuna than in canned albacore.
Cut back on tuna sushi: Ahi tuna (yellowfin and bigeye) is very high in mercury. People in vulnerable groups should avoid it altogether; others should eat it sparingly.
Make safer seafood choices: Fish with lowest mercury levels include shrimp, scallops, sardines, wild and Alaskan salmon, oyster, squid, and tilapia. (A 132-pound person can safely eat 36 ounces per week; a 44-pound child 18 ounces). Varieties with low levels: sole, haddock, pollock, flounder, crawfish, catfish, trout, Atlantic mackerel, crab, and mullet. (A 132-pound person can eat 18 ounces per week; a 44-pound child, six).
Avoid these fish entirely: If you are a frequent consumer of any type of fish — 24 ounces or more per week — Consumer Reports recommends avoiding the following: Swordfish, shark, king mackerel, Gulf tilefish, marlin, and orange roughy.
Limit consumption of these fish: Grouper, Chilean sea bass, bluefish, halibut, sablefish (black cod), and Spanish mackerel have moderately high levels of mercury.
Eat a variety of fish: This will help minimize pollutant exposures and maximize the benefits of fish, which are a good low-calorie source of protein and omega-3 fatty acids. For most healthy adults, the American Heart Association and FDA say the benefits outweigh the risks of eating two 3.5-ounce services of fish twice a week.
Excellent advice, Ruth, and just as an add-on, if you feel you want to eat some of these fishes that contain mercury, perhaps have a good amount of cilantro or other "heavy metal-chalating" foods in the same meal.

Ruth

  • Global Moderator
  • Trusted Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 48
  • Karma: +14/-0
Re: Our Diminishing Food Supply - Fish, now & for survival
« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2015, 08:41:20 PM »

Excellent advice, Ruth, and just as an add-on, if you feel you want to eat some of these fishes that contain mercury, perhaps have a good amount of cilantro or other "heavy metal-chalating" foods in the same meal.
[/quote]

Thanks Linda.
I use juice of half a fresh organic lemon in cold distilled water, figuring liver detox, several times a week. I forgot to plant cilantro in my balcony garden this year. Duh.

osu4480

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 3
  • Karma: +0/-0
Re: Our Diminishing Food Supply - Fish, now & for survival
« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2015, 07:47:02 AM »
What about tuna for my cat?  He loves tuna and Miracle Whip which I give him about once a week.

ilinda

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2783
  • Karma: +32/-0
Re: Our Diminishing Food Supply - Fish, now & for survival
« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2015, 05:48:03 AM »
What about tuna for my cat?  He loves tuna and Miracle Whip which I give him about once a week.
If your cat is old then the long term effects of mercury may be irrelevant, as he may meet his end before the mercury could poison him too much.  It's a nerve poison and tends to sequester in the central nervous system, so if you see no CNS effects, it might be OK to continue as is.

Good luck.

 

Surviving the Planet X Tribulation: A Faith-Based Leadership Guide

Surviving the Planet X Tribulation: A Faith-Based Leadership Guide

This uplifting and entertaining guide is written to give you, the reader, confidence and hope through effective leadership techniques and survival community strategies designed for an extended tribulation. Learn more...

Advertise

Marshall's Motto

Destiny comes to those who listen, and fate finds the rest.

So learn what you can learn, do what you can do, and never give up hope!