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Author Topic: what is 'survival food' / what to think of  (Read 22541 times)

R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of: Storing eggs long-term
« Reply #165 on: February 15, 2018, 03:17:32 PM »
We had discussed the Waterglass (silica gel) method of storing eggs unrefrigerated, but it's a bit messy and the gel is not available in every store.  This website ( http://preparetodaywardnewsletter.blogspot.com/2011/06/waxing-cheese-shelf-stable-eggs.html ) says that eggs coated in mineral oil and then placed back in cartons stored in a cool, dark place will last for 7-12 months.

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If you don't have chickens there is a way to have whole, real eggs for an omelet or fried egg.  Storing eggs on a shelf in your storage room is easy.

    Rub each egg with a little mineral oil. (found in the pharmacy area of the grocery store)
    Place back in the carton with the narrow tip of the egg down. (if you are using a cardboard carton place a sheet of plastic wrap down first so the oil doesn't seep through)
    Place the carton in a cool,dark spot and you will have eggs for 7-12 months. 

You won't be able to whip the egg whites, but you can have fried eggs.  Boiled eggs maybe really hard to peel, but you could try it!

Question: I wonder if there is another oil besides mineral oil that might work equally well but provide more of a food-grade coating?

« Last Edit: February 16, 2018, 07:46:20 AM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of: Unrefrigerated cheeses
« Reply #166 on: February 15, 2018, 03:37:03 PM »
Soc's .pdf is inspiring me to tackle the "unrefrigerated cheese controversy."  Here's a county health department's rule for grocers as to which cheeses may be waxed and left out on a shelf:

http://www.publichealthmdc.com/environmental/food/documents/cheese.pdf


R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #167 on: February 15, 2018, 03:55:03 PM »
So we see from the above table that the hard cheeses, which have around 40% moisture or less, are suitable for waxing and storing without refrigeration.  Some of the most familiar ones are listed:  Colby, Cheddar, Swiss, Gruyere, Parmesan, and Romano.  Gouda and Edam are right on the moisture-content borderline, with Gouda being harder and drier than Edam per this website: https://www.sciencelearn.org.nz/resources/829-creating-different-cheese-characteristics.  So we might go ahead and wax Gouda and Edam, and plan to eat them first in our rotations.

Are there any other hard cheeses not mentioned here, international or domestic?

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So here’s the good news.  You CAN have your favorite cheese on hand, even in an emergency, and even though no stores are open and you have no access to electricity.  All you have to do is buy the hard blocks of cheese that you want now in order to have them  stored for up to the next 25 years.  Cheese wax prevents your cheese from developing mold or bacteria and it keeps the moisture in.  Simply use a combination of dipping and brushing with a natural boar's hair brush to apply the melted cheese wax liberally to your block of cheese, let it harden, and then, VOILA – you’ve got your wish.  Cheese treated with cheese wax will store for up to 25 years at a mild to cool temperature.  Sure, it will continue to age.  But it sure won’t get moldy!  (And even if it does in parts, you can simply cut off that part, and re-wax over it.) Be sure that you select block sizes of cheese that you and your family can easily consume within a 3 to 5 day period in order to avoid it going bad once you’ve cut into it.
Read more at http://www.preparednesspro.com/cheese-wax-will-save-us-all-2#Kl5p3VsoVFuXgPgz.99

From http://essentialstuff.org/index.php/2011/06/06/Cat/cheese-making-waxing-the-round/

« Last Edit: February 16, 2018, 05:09:06 PM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of: Waxing Cheese
« Reply #168 on: February 15, 2018, 04:24:17 PM »
What kind of wax?

Commercial cheese wax, which PTB say is the only proper kind to use, contains parafin and something to make it less brittle.  A more organic way may be to use beeswax: http://essentialstuff.org/index.php/2011/06/06/Cat/cheese-making-waxing-the-round/

The glass pie pan in the oven method sounds easy, or a double boiler if you don't want to heat the house as much in summer.  Or it could be done outdoors.  Plan on using a pan dedicated to waxing, as it will be difficult to remove all the wax.  (Note: After we separate beeswax from honey at home, we take the stainless steel bowl outdoors and blast it clean with a cold concentrated stream from the garden hose, which is pretty effective at removing wax).

« Last Edit: February 15, 2018, 04:35:06 PM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of: Waxing Cheese
« Reply #169 on: February 15, 2018, 04:34:34 PM »
Excerpted from Soc's .pdf:

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Brushing the Cheese/Dipping the Cheese
Before you start doing any of it, you need to choose your method. You can brush the cheese, and this will result in a more even wax. It also requires smaller quantities of wax because you’ll only need as much as the brush’s length (to be dipped in).

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Or you can dip the cheese, which is my method of choice because it kills off any mold spores that might still be on the cheese while preventing any further mold from growing.  Another advantage is that you won’t have to trouble yourself with cleaning up a brush, but you will need to be very cautious with the heated wax since it can easily burn your hand.  Dip the cheese into the wax, and leave it to rest for three seconds; then rotate it to the other side.

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After that, take the initial portion of cheese and cover the unwaxed end. One light coat is better than a dense layer.
Let the wax solidify on the cheese, and repeat the same with the other parts of the cheese. Be certain to fill any air scopes to inhibit mold germination.
I would recommend doing this with bare hands, even though there’s a risk of burning your fingers.  It will give you a better grip when rotating the cheese.

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Repeat the above moves to join the second layer of wax to every part of the cheese.

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And there you go—the finished product is done. Place it onto two glasses so it can dry faster.  The glasses are also necessary if you’re brushing so that you have a good reach over the cheese, and I would recommend placing something (aluminum foil is best) under the glasses so you don’t get the place messy.

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Essential Reminders
❖ When you discern any holes in your cheese later, you can just go back and add more heated wax to those points.
❖ The wax is always reusable. Therefore, you can eat your cheese and then learn how to preserve the wax for later purposes.
❖ Whenever you free your cheese and see spots of mold wherever the wax fractured and air leaked inside, simply chop off the ruined area. The remainder of the cheese will always be exquisite.
❖ Cheese will age over a season, so do not be shocked when your cheese tastes strange when you save it for an extended period. It should taste even better!
❖ You may also pre-cover your cheese using a cheese cloth. It difficult to use the already waxed cheese later since it was difficult to tear off a single sheet of the cheese cloth. I always put the wax on every bit of the cheese that we are not utilizing and seal up the free end using the wax of the pieces we used.

ilinda

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #170 on: February 15, 2018, 06:04:07 PM »
With spring on the way, I'm always interested in plants that are both edible and produce beautiful perennial flowers.  In the link that Socrates sent is an explanation of wild potato vine (Ipomoea pandurata), which is a lovely white morning glory that produces an edible potato at its root:

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Identification: An Herbaceous perennial, the wild potato-vine grows in woodland areas. It is also known as man of the earth, wild potato vine, manroot, wild sweet potato, and wild rhubarb and produces white 185  funnel-shaped flowers (morning-glory) with a reddish-purple throat. The thin, heart-shaped leaves are 3 to 6 inches long. Unlike other morning-glories, it has ridged sepals and an enlarged root that can grow to be several feet long, 5 inches in diameter, and weigh up to 30 pounds.




I've read this for years and always wanted to know if the roots are tough or good or ?  Is anyone on the TH going to try one this year and report back to us?  Maybe I might also.  They are around, and in fact some friends say these things are suddenly invading their gardens.

R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #171 on: February 15, 2018, 06:57:58 PM »
We could both try a bit of it in the garden and compare notes - I'm game!  :)

ilinda

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #172 on: February 16, 2018, 12:58:44 PM »
We could both try a bit of it in the garden and compare notes - I'm game!  :)
I see it out in our fields here and there and promise this year to dig one after it's had time to grow.  But if perennial, the root might survive winters, and just grow a little every summer?  Update to follow....

R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #173 on: February 16, 2018, 01:44:22 PM »
Wiki says it's only perennial in frost-free areas, but it self-sows prolifically here in zone 6b. 

It also says that not all cultivars within that species produce the tuber, so it might be wise to look for saved seed, rather than cultivating a "volunteer":

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The genus Ipomoea also contains the sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas). Though the term "morning glory" is not usually extended to Ipomoea batatas, sometimes it may be referred to as a tuberous morning glory in a horticultural context. Some cultivars of Ipomoea batatas are grown for their ornamental value, rather than for the edible tuber.

Yowbarb

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #174 on: February 16, 2018, 07:20:37 PM »
Sugar, sugar cubes, etc., are probably fine for some people, but I suspect either genetic or epigenetic factors are at play in some people.  For example the oldest person in our family, Aunt Mary, who lived to be 100 yrs. plus a couple of months, had hypoglycemia, the condition that was more than the "blip" I would experience as an overdosing-on-sugar teen.

Aunt Mary learned from her doctor she should never eat white sugar because of her condition.  She ate ham, eggs, bacon, etc., but never overate.  She learned to keep her blood sugar stable.  If she hadn't she probably would have developed diabetes.

I can think of a number of foods I could easily carry besides sugar, which would provide plenty of energy.  So, I say let the sugar cube crowd carry their sugar, while I carry something else.  We'll all be happy and get the calories we need.

Hubby carries a small ziplok bag of raisins when he jogs--for the very reason of episodes of low blood sugar.  It doesn't take more than a few raisins to nip it in the bud.

Thanks for the ideas. I like the idea of raisins. I wonder if a mixture of raisins and chia seeds would be a good combo.
Personally, I was never diagnosed with hypoglycemia, but I had a sugar meter for awhile and caught some really low readings. Before that a young gal with diabetes who lived in the same building had a meter. I felt like c____ one AM and saw her in the hallway and she checked my sugar. She said, "When mine is that low I go to the ER." I went down the street a few paces to a little store and bought orange juice. Fixed some food than was OK. went through some episodes of nearly passing out.
I found that I couldn't go too long without eating, but for whatever reason I never developed diabetes and the hypoglycemia seemed to go away.
As a young teen I would sometimes feel like I was going to pass out in the AM I think my BP and blood sugar were both low. It wasn't my diet, had a "good" all American diet ...
 

Quoting excerpts of ilinda's post...
I think your idea of raisins and chia seeds is even better than just raisins alone.  My own gut feeling is that even though sweet fruit or even a sugar cube will help the immediate problem of low blood sugar, the longer term solution should be something like cottage cheese or hard cheese (not a lot) as soon as symptoms appear.  I did learn that as a teenager and that's when I learned to LOVE cottage cheese.  Of course it's not that easy to lug around cottage cheese while jogging.

But chia or quinoa, mixed with raisins or maybe dried persimmons--whatever you have, sounds like a good combo.
....
Interestingly, there seem to be many symptoms of hypoglycemia, one being a jittery feeling.  Others include mental confusion, sleepy feeling, agitation, restllessness, etc. 
And last but not least, Socrates in discussing sugar, has given me the idea of making some of our maple sap this year into maple sugar.  It's not a lot more work, just a few careful steps at the end of the boil.  I don't eat white sugar, but will certainly eat maple sugar if we have it, and will never turn down authentic honey.  Maple sugar and honey---ahhh, almost perfect foods.

ilinda, I agree some cheese in the diet, seems to be excellent at keeping away the low blood sugar symptoms... Now that you mention it, it was during times when I did not consume hardly any dairy that my hypoglycemia flared up...

I can't eat a ton of it but some seems to keep me in balance...thanks for that thought. :) What seems to work for me is moderate amounts of cottage cheese, buttermilk (yumm) provolone feta and mozzarella... I do indulge in cheddar, gouda, brie mostly just on holidays.
I cannot really drink milk...
Also, just wanted to mention, even in the strictest dietary time of my life (macrobiotic) I did allow certain sweets,  and maple candy, or syrup was one of them.
At one point the only sweeteners I allowed were maple, malt syrup, date sugar.
Those worked well for me. I allowed my toddler girl to have maple candy. Her dad would pick her up and always take her to health food store and get the little maple bears. :)
That makes me feel nostalgic, I wish I could find the image of those exact bears...
Years later, regressed into eating regular sugar products I seem to be able to handle some...not a lot. I do not seem to have any kind of sugar crash at all from a little bit of malt or maple syrup, date sugar etc.
Honey good but I find not a ton of that, either...


R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #175 on: March 10, 2018, 04:58:04 PM »
Have done an evaluation of the "Keeping Produce" down in the root cellar, meaning fruits and veggies capable of remaining usable all winter.  I mentioned in a previous post having picked up end-of-season bargains at farm stands and putting several boxes of items down there last September.  It was mostly saved as emergency stock, as I was still able to shop at stores (in other words it was conserved as much as possible in case produce should become scarce). 

Now, six months later, here are my evaluation results:

About half of the acorn squash remained viable.  All that developed soft spots were tossed on the compost heap. 

All of the cabbage heads remained usable.  Outer leaves were a bit darkened on some, but once those were peeled off, the inside heads were green.

100% of the butternut squash remained usable, and were still new-looking on the outside.  My experience with overwintering pumpkins and winter squash in the past leads me to suspect the sugar content on the inside has been used up, so they may be bland tasting when finally used and replaced, which won't be a major issue in hard times, especially if used in a recipe with other ingredients.

Several of the keeping onions were starting to send up green shoots.  This is both good and bad.  This produced fresh greens in the dark to be chopped and added to quiches, salads, salsa, stews, etc.  However, when the onions sprout, they also use up all the energy in the bulbs which then go soft.  That's not surprising considering they were six months old.  The soft ones were weeded out of the box and tossed on the compost heap.  We are using the rest up slowly, and will re-fill the box as soon as possible.

All of the Granny Smith tart apples were used up over the winter, partly because the family actually likes to eat them raw, so maybe a larger supply needs to be laid in.  There are other apples besides Granny Smith that are good keepers as well - Ilinda had recommended Arkansas Black for one.

All of the regular potatoes except seed potatoes were also used up.

Sunchoke potatoes from the garden were left to overwinter in the ground, rather than being brought indoors.

Adjusted plan:  Move acorn squash to the upstairs part of the house, as they prefer warmth like pumpkins.  Replace that space in the cold root cellar with more boxes of cabbage, as they can be used to make fresh sauerkraut in as little as a week for the beneficial probiotics.  More on that soon. :)



« Last Edit: March 11, 2018, 05:36:06 AM by R.R. Book »

 

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