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Author Topic: SEEDS...  (Read 12763 times)

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #105 on: September 09, 2017, 05:47:58 PM »
Hi Ilinda,

The little duck house has to be replenished daily, as duck excrement is more liquid due to all the water they drink and their preference for greens as food.  Henhouse gets cleaned out once a week during fair weather when they're pastured, and occasionally twice a week during foul-weather confinement, which amounts to a one-month period in winter, unless Px changes the routine.  I figure that we might go through a couple of two-twine bales of hay every month, which @ $5 per bale is nothing compared with the cost of caring for larger livestock.

Wheel barrow is right next to the henhouse, and old litter goes straight to the open gardens along with grass clippings and dead leaves, where the hens are allowed to work it in the open air and further break it down into good quick compost.  The worm houses receive all the veggie and fruit scraps, which they turn into priceless castings that go straight on the gardens once a year in autumn.
Sounds like you've got it down to a science and it is working.   I've only had chickens once and that was only for about a year or two, but really want them again, plus several dreams showed me with baby chicks in a box, so maybe it's time to get busy looking. 

Sandhill Preservation in Calamus, Iowa still has hatch dates listed in their catalog, but better go online to see the latest.  If I get them now, how soon can they be tolerant of cooler weather?  (I know when young they must be kept warm, etc., no drafts, etc.)

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #106 on: September 09, 2017, 06:47:00 PM »
Hi Ilinda,

Sounds as if your dreams are trying to tell you something!  Bet the chicks would get along with the goats too :)

For your area, which is slightly in the north I believe, I'd consider sticking with Northern breeds at this late date, to be sure they'll overwinter easily.  Might want to think about getting Rhode Island Reds, Plymouth Barred Rocks, Wyandottes, etc., in other words the brown egg layers.  Once they're fully feathered with their pullet feathers, at six weeks, they can leave the brooder and be outdoors at least part of the time, maybe on a gradual basis. 

Of course, tolerance to the cold can be increased by other factors too, such as body heat from a flock size near capacity of the coop (our larger one is rated for a dozen, but we keep the chicken flock @ between 6 and 10 usually, so disease is not encouraged).  If you're having a coop custom-built, you can request that a layer of foam be put between the floor joists, beneath the glassboard-covered floor (glassboard is the only way to go for cleanliness and durability).  Wrapped hay bales can be stacked around the base or legs of the coop in winter, and blankets folded over the nest box door, if one comes with the coop.  And deep dry hay, both on the floor and in nest boxes.  Extra treats to plump them up will also harden them off to winter - some folks like to keep a suet cake available during cold weather, or you can make your own with PB and seeds, etc.

As an alternative to chicks, you could spend a few dollars more and order started pullets, which would be brought home about a month before they begin laying, so around 16 weeks of age. 
« Last Edit: September 10, 2017, 06:13:30 AM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #107 on: September 13, 2017, 05:25:39 PM »
The two olive trees mentioned in another thread were seedlings I think, and not started from cuttings. I think.  So, am posting a pic of one of them here, and as of this week they're a bit taller than 5', whereas last year at this time were maybe 1 1/2' tall.  They apparently love our Ozark climate, for now at least.

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #108 on: October 09, 2017, 11:19:43 AM »
What a handsome plant!

Here are a couple of shots of the Seminole pumpkin taking taking over the garden (seems the more I prune it, the larger it gets!)...

MadMax

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #109 on: October 09, 2017, 04:39:25 PM »
ilinda

Quote
They apparently love our Ozark climate, for now at least.

I thought that you lived in Oregon (or did I get that wrong)?

Take care,
Max
"Ignorance is Bliss" - (Agent Smith the first Matrix Movie)

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #110 on: October 10, 2017, 11:24:14 AM »
What a handsome plant!

Here are a couple of shots of the Seminole pumpkin taking taking over the garden (seems the more I prune it, the larger it gets!)...
At the end of the garden season, do you calculate productivity?  For example, four pumpkin plants produced "X" number of pumpkins?  They DO take over, don't they?  But the beauty of that is they shade the weeds.

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #111 on: October 10, 2017, 11:29:59 AM »
ilinda

Quote
They apparently love our Ozark climate, for now at least.

I thought that you lived in Oregon (or did I get that wrong)?

Take care,
Max
I live in Missouri's Ozarks, specifically, in the foothills of the Saint Francois Mountains, the oldest mountain range in North America, which also means the lowest in elevation.  Latitude is about 37 deg. north.

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #112 on: October 10, 2017, 12:35:41 PM »
Quote
At the end of the garden season, do you calculate productivity?

Absolutely, and keep a journal of it as well.  However, with all the dramatic sprawling of the Seminole and with its true-to-reputation disease resistance, I'm only just beginning to see small pumpkins forming, and hope they put on some rapid growth, because the vine may begin dying back upon next week's evening frosts and freezes. :(

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #113 on: October 16, 2017, 01:04:38 PM »
Here are photos of my purple hyacinth beans, which are a favorite plant in this area both for food and ornamental purposes.  The first shot depicts the last of the blossoms in shades of violet and lavender, which was prettier in its prime entwined among the roses during late summer and early autumn.

The second shot shows the purple bean pods ready to be harvested. 

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #114 on: October 16, 2017, 05:48:23 PM »
Here are photos of my purple hyacinth beans, which are a favorite plant in this area both for food and ornamental purposes.  The first shot depicts the last of the blossoms in shades of violet and lavender, which was prettier in its prime entwined among the roses during late summer and early autumn.

The second shot shows the purple bean pods ready to be harvested.
Thanks for sharing these photos of such beautiful plants.  Do you cook the beans, or are they for chickens?  Will chickens eat the pods and leaves?

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #115 on: October 17, 2017, 03:17:08 PM »
They can be used either for human consumption or for livestock feed, cooked the same as any other beans.  The hens have mostly been ignoring the leaves on the climbing vine, mainly because I had enclosed the first couple of feet of it in a chickenwire frame to allow it to get off to a good start before being clawed and pecked at.  :)

Here's what PFAF says:

Edible Parts: Flowers;  Leaves;  Root;  Seed;  Seedpod.
Edible Uses:

The mature seed is edible as long as it is thoroughly cooked[2, 27, 33, 34, 74, 171]. It has a mild flavour, is rich in protein and can be used as a staple food. The seed can also be prepared as 'tofu' or be fermented into 'tempeh' in the same way that soya beans are used in Japan[183]. The seed can also be sprouted and eaten raw, when it is comparable to mung bean sprouts[179, 183]. A nutritional analysis is available[218]. The tender young seedpods and immature seeds can be eaten raw or cooked. They can be used as a green vegetable like French beans[46, 74, 114]. They are also used as a curry vegetable[183]. The immature seedpod contains 3.2% protein, 0.8% fat, 5.4% carbohydrate, 0.81% ash. It is rich in vitamin B1[179]. Leaves - they must be cooked[160, 179]. They can also be dried for later use[183]. The leaves are used as a greens just like spinach[183]. They contain up to 28% protein[160] (dry weight?). Flowers - raw or cooked in soups and stews[183]. Root - large and starchy[183].
Composition
Figures in grams (g) or miligrams (mg) per 100g of food.  (Note: 100 g = about 3/4 c)   
Seed (Fresh weight)    

    334 Calories per 100g
    Water : 12.1%
    Protein: 21.5g; Fat: 1.2g; Carbohydrate: 61.4g; Fibre: 6.8g; Ash: 3.8g;
    Minerals - Calcium: 98mg; Phosphorus: 345mg; Iron: 3.9mg; Magnesium: 0mg; Sodium: 0mg; Potassium: 0mg; Zinc: 0mg;
    Vitamins - A: 0mg; Thiamine (B1): 0mg; Riboflavin (B2): 0mg; Niacin: 0mg; B6: 0mg; C: 0mg

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #116 on: October 17, 2017, 05:36:52 PM »
They can be used either for human consumption or for livestock feed, cooked the same as any other beans.  The hens have mostly been ignoring the leaves on the climbing vine, mainly because I had enclosed the first couple of feet of it in a chickenwire frame to allow it to get off to a good start before being clawed and pecked at.  :)

Here's what PFAF says:

Edible Parts: Flowers;  Leaves;  Root;  Seed;  Seedpod.
Edible Uses:

The mature seed is edible as long as it is thoroughly cooked[2, 27, 33, 34, 74, 171]. It has a mild flavour, is rich in protein and can be used as a staple food. The seed can also be prepared as 'tofu' or be fermented into 'tempeh' in the same way that soya beans are used in Japan[183]. The seed can also be sprouted and eaten raw, when it is comparable to mung bean sprouts[179, 183]. A nutritional analysis is available[218]. The tender young seedpods and immature seeds can be eaten raw or cooked. They can be used as a green vegetable like French beans[46, 74, 114]. They are also used as a curry vegetable[183]. The immature seedpod contains 3.2% protein, 0.8% fat, 5.4% carbohydrate, 0.81% ash. It is rich in vitamin B1[179]. Leaves - they must be cooked[160, 179]. They can also be dried for later use[183]. The leaves are used as a greens just like spinach[183]. They contain up to 28% protein[160] (dry weight?). Flowers - raw or cooked in soups and stews[183]. Root - large and starchy[183].
Composition
Figures in grams (g) or miligrams (mg) per 100g of food.  (Note: 100 g = about 3/4 c)   
Seed (Fresh weight)    

    334 Calories per 100g
    Water : 12.1%
    Protein: 21.5g; Fat: 1.2g; Carbohydrate: 61.4g; Fibre: 6.8g; Ash: 3.8g;
    Minerals - Calcium: 98mg; Phosphorus: 345mg; Iron: 3.9mg; Magnesium: 0mg; Sodium: 0mg; Potassium: 0mg; Zinc: 0mg;
    Vitamins - A: 0mg; Thiamine (B1): 0mg; Riboflavin (B2): 0mg; Niacin: 0mg; B6: 0mg; C: 0mg
They have a lot of value--way more than I thought, as I always wrongly assumed they are so pretty, they must be toxic.

Socrates

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saline plants
« Reply #117 on: March 19, 2018, 05:15:55 AM »
Scrops.com researches saline crops [i.e. that can be grown in seawater]. (I emailed them today, asking if they can supply seeds.)

I have a theory; the oldest known human 'race' is that of people in Indonesia, the bones of which go back 100,000 years. I ask myself: why would this race of people go back so far? and i answer (myself): Well, they have many thousands of miles of coastline from which to harvest sea vegetables [i.e. seaweed as well as fish, shells and crustaceans]. In other words, if the world has gone to sh!t and there's neither animal nor plant life to speak of, these people might well have survived on what they found along the coast.
Let's be clear: in a TEOTWAWKI emergency, the one constant in the world will likely be the sea.

Carl Hodges has been researching the possiblity of growing crops along the sea coast. These crops are mainly 4:
- salicornia
- mangrove
- shrimp
- fish
One keeps shrimp in basins that are refreshed daily by the tide; the effluent hereof goes on to feed the fish one keeps in a following basin; the effluent hereof goes on to fertilize the salicornia crop and the rest goes on to fertilize a mangrove forest.
In the end one has shrimp, fish, salicornia and wood [i.e. loads to eat and some wood to burn and build with], all grown along the sea. In practice mangrove leaves and salicornia are often fed to one's goats, though salicornia is fine food for humans [they sell it here at the local supermarket].
(And i should add: since health ultimately seems to come down to getting a good array [quantity as well as quality] of minerals, seafood is wonderful in this regard since it comes from an environment in which all minerals are to be found.)


There are, however, other saline crops. And as Carl Hodges puts it, there are 25,000 miles of coastline on Earth that could be used for growing them.
In an EOTWAWKI scenario all soil might well have been washed or blown away; that would be a good time to plant one's saline crop seeds (until better times arrive).
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location, civilisation reboot, PERMACULTURE, postcataclysmic soil, Growing Soil 1.01

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #118 on: March 19, 2018, 06:16:22 AM »
Thanks so much for the info Socrates - from the photos, it looks as if the sea crops can be field-grown on land without too much trouble.  The Sea Aster looks especially interesting to me. 

Those who suffer from stone formation might want to be cautious with three of the species that are in the goosefoot (chenopodium) family:  salsola, sea beet and salicornia.  Might want to try sampling them in small amounts, or eating them in larger portions while avoiding other stone-forming foods such as chocolate, nuts, bran and spinach.

Would love to learn more about ordering seeds for the sea aster if you receive an answer from them!

Socrates

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SEEDS from trees
« Reply #119 on: April 18, 2018, 05:01:19 AM »
Start Your Own Apple Trees From Seeds goes into the particulars of growing apple trees from seed.
This article is full of delicate details, like: Place the bag in the fridge to stratify for anywhere from 1- 6 months. (Granny Smiths can take longer … be patient.)

As i've mentioned before, Permies owner Paul Wheaton has said about growing apple trees from seed:
- 1 out of 5 will produce good tasting apples
- 3 out of 5 will produce apples that are good to eat but not excellent
- 1 out of 5 will produce bad-tasting apples
- culling trees is an integral part of starting a food forest [which needs loads of seedlings to begin with]
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location, civilisation reboot, PERMACULTURE, postcataclysmic soil, Growing Soil 1.01

 

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