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Author Topic: Northern Permaculture  (Read 12742 times)

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #120 on: June 08, 2018, 08:28:18 AM »
Thanks for the detailed information Ilinda.  Am hoping that our growing season will be long enough even to produce the unripe squash.  If our first frost, which normally comes in the 2nd week of October, comes any earlier, the Yamiken may not have time to switch from making male blossoms to female ones.  Will report back!  :)

ilinda

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #121 on: June 08, 2018, 11:18:26 AM »
We may be jockeying for pole position to see who even gets female flowers!  I'm having the strangest time getting them in the ground.  The first ones got too cold and all rotted or just died.  Second planting took forever, and am now on 3rd and 4th plantings, some in pots, some in the ground.

Some in pots were actually dug up because the bed didn't seem like good enough soil, etc.  Growing one's own food is really challenging!

We can update each other as time permits.  My best guess is that when you see first blossoms, they'll be male, and that will continue for 2-4 weeks before you see females.  At any rate, even the green fruits, if taken indoors, will eventually ripen.

I read somewhere that the reason for the huge preponderance of first-male fruits is to attract the pollinators to the patch.  If the "aroma parcel of air" extends out enough, it will surely be noticed by the appropriate pollinators and they will then visit the squash patch, by which time the female flowers are beginning to appear.

I never gave a lot of thought to any of this until we started growing Yamiken.  Everything was taken for granted, whether it was butternut, zucchini, yellow crookneck, etc., but now with this fruit, I feel it is too important to "let it go".

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #122 on: June 08, 2018, 06:25:52 PM »
Quote
Growing one's own food is really challenging!

That's a good sub-topic starter: Which crops are easiest for novice gardeners, and which require more experience (meaning some risk of crop failure)?

Ideas for the Northern gardener:

No Experience Needed:
Potatoes: Sunchokes
Greens: Dandelion
Berries: Shrub - dwarf raspberries, tree - mulberry, ground cover - strawberries
Legumes: Siberian peas; pole beans to climb sunchokes (plant-and-replant)
Stone fruits: Tart cherries
Alliums: Chives, walking onions, Welsh onions, garlic
Tomatoes: Cherry tomatoes can be container-grown and overwintered as perennials indoors
Peppers: Dwarf ones could be container-grown and overwintered as perennials indoors
Grain: Good King Henry (an amaranth)
Radishes: Rapidly grown both as food and for soil aeration and tillage as prep for other crops
Apiaceae (parsley, celery): Lovage
Vine: Hardy Kiwi
Other: Asparagus


Experience Helpful, and Why:
*Curcubits (pumpkins, squash, gourds):
All are potentially subject to fungus in the north; vining types require lots of space; many are subject to squash vine borer; beds must be rotated every year unless special soil amendments are made.

Other stone fruit trees and nut trees:
Need to research carefully to learn:
Which are disease resistant; which need two different cultivars; which come on dwarfing rootstock suitable for smaller homesteads; best methods of annual pruning; which are winter hardy; which have longevity, which  need a lot of water; which don't like much rain.  Can be a long wait for production.  Trunks need early protection from rodents, and constant protection from deer.  May need annual removal by hand of moth larvae nests to prevent mass defoliation.  Some cultivars may bear only every other year.

Grapes: Need to research carefully to learn:
Which are suitable geographically; which are seedless; which are disease-resistant; which are winter-hardy.  Some need to be pruned frequently; may need a hormone supplement to help clusters fill in well.  Can be a long wait for production.  Physical supports needed, such as a fence.

Brassicas: Subject to club root infection unless kept in very well-drained soil. Need lots of room.  Cabbages must be shielded from cabbage fly and cabbage moth larvae.  A few cultivars are perennial, but require special ordering from limited suppliers, some of which may not be in your country.  These sell out quickly, and rootstock may need to be ordered months ahead of time and pre-paid.

Non-bitter greens: Spinach and lettuce bolt as soon as it gets warm, meaning they'll send up a flower stalk and die.

Blueberries: Require very acidic soil with at least annual amendments.  Should not be planted near a butterfly garden, as their larvae will feast on the leaves.  Need to be faster than the birds to get any of the harvest.  Water hogs. 

Currants:  Need to carefully research new disease-resistant cultivars. 

Artichokes: Best grown in a limited coastal climate; need lots of room

Potatoes: Subject to diseases; hill culture needs to be built up; require lots of space to feed a family; rootstock needs to be overwintered in special indoor conditions.

Corn: Requires careful sourcing of non-GMO seed for all but popcorn; cultivars need distance apart or succession planting; large space requirement; bed rotation requirement.

Watermelons: Nearly all types are subject to diseases and come with this warning on seed packets now.

Vining tomatoes: Subject to diseases, and seem to alternate between good and bad years in the North.  In a good year they can be prolific.

Suggestion: Dedicate the most space in the garden to failure-proof crops, and then perform limited experiments every year to see what else you can add.

Other ideas?

« Last Edit: June 13, 2018, 06:56:33 AM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #123 on: June 15, 2018, 07:13:41 AM »
While waiting for most of the berries to finish ripening in the North, there are mulberry trees all over the place - at the edge of woodlands and in public parks - that are heavily laden with fruit that is dropping all over the ground.  One need not own a mulberry tree to take home a bag or container-full. 



Phytochemicals:

https://borneoscobhd.en.ec21.com/Freeze_Dried_Mulberry_Antioxidant_Berry--8956654_10013726.html

Smoothie Recipe from Pinterest:




Nutritional Completeness Profile from NutritionData:
Quote
Each spoke in the wheel represents a different nutrient. The spoke for dietary fiber is colored green, protein is blue, vitamins are purple, minerals are white, and yellow represents a group of commonly overconsumed nutrients—saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2018, 01:07:11 PM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #124 on: June 15, 2018, 08:22:38 PM »
While waiting for most of the berries to finish ripening in the North, there are mulberry trees all over the place - at the edge of woodlands and in public parks - that are heavily laden with fruit that is dropping all over the ground.  One need not own a mulberry tree to take home a bag or container-full. 



Phytochemicals:

https://borneoscobhd.en.ec21.com/Freeze_Dried_Mulberry_Antioxidant_Berry--8956654_10013726.html

Smoothie Recipe from Pinterest:




Nutritional Completeness Profile from NutritionData:
Quote
Each spoke in the wheel represents a different nutrient. The spoke for dietary fiber is colored green, protein is blue, vitamins are purple, minerals are white, and yellow represents a group of commonly overconsumed nutrients—saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium.
Are your wild mulberries the ones commonly found throughout the U.S. in the wild?  A friend has an unusual mulberry tree with a growth habit totally different from that of the wild ones, which are tall, lanky, and not overly laden with fruit.  But friend's tree is shorter, with very dense canopy, and loaded with berries that are longer and sweeter than those wild ones.

We've tried about everything to get starts from her tree, with little success, and wish we knew more about it.

R.R. Book

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Re: Northern Permaculture
« Reply #125 on: June 16, 2018, 06:30:35 AM »
Hi Ilinda,

The only deliberately cultivated mulberry that we have is a dwarf variety.  The wild mulberries that I've seen around here all grow on the edge of the woods and mostly on the edge of a stream located in a flood plain, in part-sun & part-shade.  They have fruited heavily this year, probably because we've had more rain than sun this spring.  Their production is very much tied to water availability.  And yes, the wild berries are shorter and black when ripe, unlike the red or white cultivars.  :)

 

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