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Author Topic: Miscellaneous threats to survival  (Read 75717 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: Miscellaneous threats to survival
« Reply #375 on: August 24, 2017, 01:13:34 PM »
Here is the link for Aware Electronics, which sells a number of types of radiation detectors/monitors:

http://www.aw-el.com/

Thanks!

MadMax

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Re: Miscellaneous threats to survival
« Reply #376 on: November 01, 2017, 02:36:32 PM »
Officials Warn: Airborne Black Death Epidemic Could ‘Explode’!!  :o

http://www.shtfplan.com/headline-news/officials-warn-airborne-black-death-epidemic-could-explode_11012017

The bubonic plague outbreak that is taking Madagascar to its knees will more than likely last another six months. But the worst news is that the epidemic could explode anytime unleashing the sickness on the globe.

At least 128 people have been killed and more than 1,300 infected by the deadlier pneumonic strain of the medieval disease. But the oncoming rainy season could see the number of those infected explode exponentially. The rainy season poses a threat to the containment of the plague because outbreaks of this magnitude often seem to be seasonal.

The Foreign Office recently warned that the deadly outbreak is entering its most dangerous phase. Its website said that “outbreaks of plague tend to be seasonal and occur mainly during the rainy season.” The African island’s wet season officially began today and will last until the end of April, meaning the downward trend the plague had seen over the past few days, will likely turn upward again.

Because the disease can be spread easily through a cough or sneeze, experts are fearful. It would take just one infected traveler who made it to Africa’s mainland or even nearby British honeymoon paradises like Mauritius, the Maldives or the Seychelles to spread the disease globally. The Seychelles is currently putting anyone traveling from Madagascar into quarantine on arrival as a precaution.

The outbreak has been fueled by performing the ancient practice of Famadihana. Famadihana is the “dancing with the dead” ritual which sees locals dig up deceased relatives and dance with them before they are reburied.  Just contact with a corpse who’s death was because they contracted the plague could sicken a person.

The country’s health chief Willy Randriamarotia said: “If a person dies of pneumonic plague and is then interred in a tomb that is subsequently opened for a Famadihana, the bacteria can still be transmitted and contaminate whoever handles the body.” The tradition has been banned since the outbreak began, but it is feared ceremonies have taken place regardless as local continue to balk that their rituals have contributed to the outbreak.

This latest warning that the rainy season could worsen the outbreak comes on the heels of the reports that British aid workers said the epidemic will get worse before it gets better. Olivier Le Guillou of Action Against Hunger said: “The epidemic is ahead of us, we have not yet reached the peak.”

As many as 50 aid workers are believed to have been among the 1,200 people infected with the more dangerous airborne pneumonic strain of the disease.

Max.
"Ignorance is Bliss" - (Agent Smith the first Matrix Movie)

MadMax

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Re: Miscellaneous threats to survival
« Reply #377 on: November 04, 2017, 01:44:11 PM »
Black Death WARNING: Now there are THREE types of killer Plague as bodycount rises to 127

https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/874547/Madagascar-Black-Death-plague-bubonic-septicaemic-pneumonic-world-health-organisation-WHO

Medical experts from the World Health Organisation (WHO) have revealed cases of bubonic, septicaemic and pneumonic plague have all been found on the Indian Ocean island which is at the centre of a global epidemic alert.

Bubonic plague is the most common form. It is spread by fleas and is characterised by painful swollen lymph nodes.

Pneumonic plague can be caused by breathing in airborne plague bacteria and is a particularly infectious form because it invades the lungs and can spread quickly from person to person, through coughing or in confined spaces.

The septicaemic strain of the terrifying disease is a life-threatening infection of the blood, most commonly spread by bites from infected fleas.

WHO bosses said their Black Death risk assessment was under constant review as the situation evolved.

Max.
"Ignorance is Bliss" - (Agent Smith the first Matrix Movie)

R.R. Book

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Re: Miscellaneous threats to survival
« Reply #378 on: November 13, 2017, 10:52:39 AM »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=98ohMjQwuew

Plague vector routes from Madagascar predicted


Yowbarb

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Re: Miscellaneous threats to survival
« Reply #379 on: November 13, 2017, 11:51:14 AM »
Good grief...

Yowbarb

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Re: Miscellaneous threats to survival
« Reply #380 on: May 17, 2018, 11:45:20 AM »
This may seem like a minor thing to consider, but pollen can pose a real health hazard for a % of people.
For now just posting a link and today's National Pollen Map.
Go to the page for the interactive map:
...

https://www.pollen.com/map

R.R. Book

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Re: Miscellaneous threats to survival
« Reply #381 on: May 17, 2018, 12:59:58 PM »
Depending upon your perspective, the red locations on that map could be viewed as being positive, as the pollen stimulates honey bees to build-up their colonies.  :)


Yowbarb

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Re: Miscellaneous threats to survival
« Reply #382 on: May 17, 2018, 11:48:01 PM »
Depending upon your perspective, the red locations on that map could be viewed as being positive, as the pollen stimulates honey bees to build-up their colonies.  :)



That is so true. What a lovely sight, that little bee covered with pollen. :)

ilinda

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Re: Miscellaneous threats to survival
« Reply #383 on: May 18, 2018, 07:24:50 PM »
This may seem like a minor thing to consider, but pollen can pose a real health hazard for a % of people.
...

Agreed!  Asthmatics and those with other lung problems notice immediately when there is particulate matter, whether pollen or something else, floating around.  It often suddenly feels like something is "catching your throat from the inside". 

Yowbarb

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Re: Miscellaneous threats to survival
« Reply #384 on: June 13, 2018, 09:36:05 PM »
This may seem like a minor thing to consider, but pollen can pose a real health hazard for a % of people.
...

Agreed!  Asthmatics and those with other lung problems notice immediately when there is particulate matter, whether pollen or something else, floating around.  It often suddenly feels like something is "catching your throat from the inside".

Very true...

Yowbarb

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Re: Miscellaneous threats to survival
« Reply #385 on: June 13, 2018, 09:44:55 PM »
TICKS - More on ticks is posted in other Boards, of course...
...
.
https://www.motherearthnews.com/

Tick Prevention and Management

Given their capacity to carry Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever, tick prevention is a must if you're spending time in wooded areas. Here are 10 tips we recommend.

By Barbara Pleasant | June/July 2010

If you live near or often spend time in a wooded area, blood-sucking ticks are part of your world. When tick populations rise in July and August, you’ll again feel those familiar tickling sensations on your legs and neck, and again drag the dog into the sunlight so you can spot and remove those darn ticks. During this process, you may be wondering whether there are better ways to survive tick season, especially if you don’t want to use DEET (a chemical insecticide that may cause eye irritation, rash, or other side effects) on yourself or veterinarian-grade pesticides on your pets. Even if you do use chemicals in your tick management plan, it’s still a good idea to back them up with natural tick prevention strategies.

The stakes can be high. First described in 1977 as “Lyme arthritis,” tick-vectored (transmitted) Lyme disease is now the most common critter-vectored disease in North America. More than 30,000 cases were reported in 2008, including many in towns and cities where no previous infections had been recorded. Like an invasive weed, Lyme disease is slowly spreading inland from its stronghold along the northern Atlantic coast.

Caused by the bacterium Borrelia brugdorferi, Lyme disease is carried by deer ticks (also known as black-legged ticks). White-footed mice frequently serve as reservoirs for the bacteria, as do deer and many other mammals. Ticks are most likely to transmit Lyme disease to humans when they are tiny nymphs (juvenile ticks), only slightly bigger than the period at the end of this sentence. Other tick species transmit diseases as well, including Rocky Mountain spotted fever. So no matter where you live, preventing ticks from finding you and your pets is always a good idea. To help you stay ahead of these pests, here are the top 10 natural ways to make tick season easier to take.

1. Dress Defensively. When you venture into areas where ticks might be waiting, dress for the occasion. Wear a hat and light-colored clothing (to help you see ticks before they find skin), and tuck your shirt into your pants and your pants into your socks. You may look goofy, but it’s better than becoming a tick’s dinner.

2. Get Sticky. Keep a sticky tape-type lint roller handy if you’re finding ticks regularly. This little gizmo will pick up unattached ticks from clothing or pets, which bring hitchhiking ticks into the house. Use any type of sticky tape to cleanly capture ticks crawling in your home.

3. Clean Up Your Act. When you come indoors after outside activities, give your clothes a 10-minute spin in a hot clothes dryer to kill any ticks that might be hiding in the folds or seams. Then take a hot, soapy bath or shower. Unattached ticks will be flushed away, but you will still need to do a tick check of your body.

4. Do Tick Checks. Ticks must feed for 36 to 48 hours in order to transmit Lyme disease, so regularly checking yourself for ticks after you’ve been in wooded areas is a hugely effective preventive measure. Look for tiny and foreign dark dots, especially in moist body creases in the armpits, groin, hairline, scalp, waistband and the backs of your knees. Let someone else check you, if possible, because it’s difficult to check your own scalp and backside. Because of their tiny size, it is entirely possible to carry a nymph on your body long enough for it to feed and then drop off without you ever knowing you were bitten, so be sure to check often and carefully. Check yourself before bed, too.

5. Upgrade Your Tick Removal Equipment. If you’re using tweezers or a pair of forceps to remove an attached tick from yourself or your pets, you’re doing it the hard way. Instead, try using small tick removal “spoons” such as the Tick Twister for little deer ticks, Ticked Off for any size ticks, or a Tick Key tick remover for larger dog ticks. All of these devices cost less than $5 and they are worth every penny. Look for them at pet stores or from online merchants.

6. Put Poultry to Work. Ticks have few natural predators, but many MOTHER EARTH NEWS readers report that their flocks of poultry have made big impacts on tick populations. In a study from South Africa, chickens were found to eat an average of 10 ticks per hour. (There's an article on poultry pest control. (Yowbarb Note - go to Mother Earth News main page. I cannot post the links, way too long.)




ilinda

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Re: Miscellaneous threats to survival
« Reply #386 on: June 14, 2018, 05:16:39 PM »
And now there is yet another tick threat to the midwest:
East Asian Tick Found in Benton County, Arkansas


http://5newsonline.com/2018/06/11/longhorned-tick-found-in-arkansas/

 

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Surviving the Planet X Tribulation: A Faith-Based Leadership Guide

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