Author Topic: Foods for on the road: Hardtack, Pemmican and other ancient foods  (Read 14255 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: Foods for on the road: Hardtack, Pemmican and other ancient foods
« Reply #15 on: August 04, 2012, 06:37:53 PM »
A couple weeks ago I was at Walmart.  I normally don't go there, but I happened to see they were selling the plastic stuff that seals food.  I didn't see if they had the machine, but I didn't look either.  You could try there.
Thanks for the idea...I go to WalMart and COSTCO every week...

Yowbarb

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Re: Foods for on the road: Hardtack, Pemmican and other ancient foods
« Reply #16 on: January 22, 2013, 08:15:07 AM »
[ Yowbarb Note: I cannot guarantee all of these would keep well for emergency fast
travel. It seems they would keep better than regular bread. 
Unleavened breads...some comments and recipes to be found on this site,
I don't know if the recipes are kosher...they look good and useful.
More recipes may follow in next posts...]

...

http://www.nazareneisrael.org/Study/AdditionalCalendarStudies(more)/UnleavenedBreadRecipes.aspx

Unleavened Bread Recipes

"....May YHWH bless you and your household during this special time, and may you enjoy this special Festival of Unleavened Bread with your family, as our forefathers did in the days of old.
Pesach Sameach!
(Happy Passover!)"
Norman
 
Table of Contents

BREADS

 
Unleavened Bread

1/2 c. water
 
2 Tbsp. sugar
 
1 tsp. salt
 
2 Tbsp. oil
 
1 1/4 c. flour
 
Knead until smooth. Roll out to quarter inch thick. Bake at 300 degrees for 30 to 40 minutes. Put on cookie sheet. This only makes a small batch (about a quart size bag), but it can be doubled easily.

...
 
Second Unleavened Bread Recipe
3/4 cup scalded milk
 
1 egg
 
1/4 cup honey
 
2-1/4 cup flour
 
1/4 cup butter
 
1 tsp. salt
 
Beat egg, milk, honey, and butter together. Add the flour gradually. Knead until smooth. Roll the mixture to 1/4" thick, then cut in shapes (round or square). Prick with a fork. Bake on baking sheet at 375 degrees for 15 or 20 minutes.
..................................................................................................
Third Unleavened Bread Recipe


Cheese Bread
 
1/2 lb longhorn cheese
 
3 eggs
 
1/2 lb jack cheese
 
1-1/3 cup milk
 
1 cup flour
 
1/2 cup melted butter
 
1 tsp salt

Grate cheeses. Mix ingredients and put in greased pan. Bake at 350°F for 45 minutes. Score with a fork to produce the stripes by which we are healed.
.............................................................................................
 
Anonymous Unleavened Bread

1 1/2 c. flour
 
1 lb. dark brown sugar
 
1 c. nuts, chopped
 
4 eggs
 
1/2 tsp. salt
 
1 tsp. vanilla
 
Beat eggs well. Then add remaining ingredients and beat well. Pour into a greased and floured 9x13 inch pan and bake for 30 minutes in a 350 degree oven.
 
Darrel’s Unleavened Bread
 
1 cup whole wheat flour
 
1/2 cup olive oil
 
1 cup water
 
2 Tbsp. honey (for Passover meal omit honey)
 
Mix oil and flour first; stir. Add water and honey and whisk (it will he runny). Spread thin on baking sheet. Bake as hot as you can (about 500-600 degree oven) for 6 to 7 minutes.
...
 
Matzah
 
1 cup flour
 
1/4 teaspoon salt
 
2 tablespoons shortening
 
5 tablespoons water (about)
 
Mix dry ingredients, cut in shortening, mix in enough water to make dough soft and kneadable. Divide into fourths. Roll out to about 8" and cook on a hot skillet until browned. Flip and brown other side. Makes four 8" maztos. Keeps well if thoroughly dry.
...

Cinnamon Matza
 
1 cup flour
 
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
 
1/8 teaspoon cloves
 
1/8 teaspoon nutmeg
 
1 tablespoons sugar
 
1/4 teaspoon salt
 
1 tablespoons butter
 
2/3 cup water (about)
 
Mix dry ingredients, cut in shortening, mix in enough water to make dough soft and kneadable. Divide into fourths. Roll out to about 8" and cook on a hot skillet until browned. Flip and brown other side. Makes four 8" maztos. Keeps well if thoroughly dry.

Matzo (thanks to Tahar for this recipe :)
 
Before you start mixing all ingredients, turn oven on and preheat to 425.
 
2 cups of flour
 
3/4 cup liquid (I use kosher wine and water mixed)
 
1/2 cup oil (olive is the best)
 
1 cup sugar
 
Mix together, break apart in pieces, and flatten. Adjust liquid if needed. Pierce each cake with a fork. Bake until edges are brown, about 15 minutes. They are like unleavened cookies.
..........................................................................................
 
Egg and Onion Matza
 
2 ¼ cups flour
 
¾ tsp salt
 
1/3 cup butter
 
1 egg, beaten
 
1 Tbs onion powder
 
½ cup milk
 
Combine onion powder and milk in a small bowl, allow to soak for a few minutes. In a mixing bowl, combine flour and salt. Cut in butter. Add egg and onion powder/milk mixture. Knead dough until smooth and soft, adding additional flour if needed. Divide dough in half. On a lightly floured surface, roll each piece of dough into a large rectangle (at least ¼” thick, but no more than ½” thick). Cut dough into 2” x 2” squares or desired size. Place squares on a lightly greased and lightly salted cookie sheet. Prick each square with a fork several times before baking. Bake at 450 degrees for 10-14 minutes or until golden and cooked through (but not hard or dark). Remove ro wire rack; cool.
 
Italian Version: To milk and onion mixture add 1 tbs garlic powder, ¼ tsp dried parsley, and ¼ cup parmesan cheese.
...
 
Golden Discs (Unleavened Bread)
 
4 c. unbleached flour
 
1 tsp. salt
 
1 1/2 c. water (room temp.)
 
Combine the flour and salt. Add enough water to make dough that will clean the sides of the bowl and can be gathered into a ball. Turn out onto a lightly floured board and knead 10 minutes. Shape into a ball and cut in half. Cut each half in 8 pieces and form into 16 balls. Roll out each ball to form about a 7" circle. Place on an ungreased cookie sheet and bake in a preheated 500 degree oven for 5 minutes or until discs are lightly colored, blistered, and crisp. Serve with cheese chips and soups. Makes 16 discs.
...
 
Snacking Bread (Unleavened)

Blend:
 
1 3/4 cups all purpose flour
 
1/2 teaspoon salt
 
3 cups whole wheat flour
 
1/2 cup brown sugar
 
Add:
 
2/3 cup vegetable oil
 
1 egg
 
1 cup milk
 
Mix well. Before baking, sprinkle a mixture of 2 tablespoons sugar and ½ teaspoon cinnamon over the surface of bread. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Spray cookie sheets or jelly
 
Roll pan with oil. Divide dough in half. With lightly floured hands, pat each ball of dough onto sheet until it is desired thickness (about 3/8 inch). Cut raw dough into squares and prick center of each square with fork. Bake 15 to 18 minutes or until it begins to brown. Over - baking will cause it to be too brittle.
...
 
Stew Bread
 
Blend:
 
1 3/4 cups all purpose flour
 
2 cups whole wheat flour
 
1/2 teaspoon salt
 
Add:
 
2/3 cup vegetable oil
 
1 egg
 
1 cup milk
 
Mix well. Before baking, sprinkle a mixture of 2 tablespoons sugar and ½ teaspoon cinnamon over the surface of bread. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Spray cookie sheets or jeIly
 
Roll pan with oil. Divide dough in half. With lightly floured hands, pat each ball of dough onto sheet until it is desired thickness (about 3/8 inch). Cut raw dough into squares and prick center of each square with fork. Bake 15 to 18 minutes or until it begins to brown. Over -baking will cause it to be too brittle.
............................................................................................
 
Raisin (or Blueberry) Bread
 
Blend:
 
3/4 cups all purpose flour
 
2 cups whole wheat flour
 
3/4 cup sugar or honey
 
1 teaspoon cinnamon
 
1 cup raisins (or blueberries)
 
1/2 teaspoon salt
 
Add:
 
2/3 cup vegetable oil
 
1 egg
 
1 cup milk (3/4 cup if honey is used)
 
Mix well. Before baking, sprinkle a mixture of 2 tablespoons sugar and ½ teaspoon cinnamon over the surface of bread. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. (If you use honey, preheat oven to 375 degrees.) Spray cookie sheets or jelly
 
Roll pan with oil. Divide dough in half. With lightly floured hands, pat each ball of dough onto sheet until it is desired thickness (about 3/8 inch). Cut raw dough into squares and prick center of each square with fork. Bake 15 to 18 minutes or until it begins to brown. Over - baking will cause it to be too brittle.
......................................................................................
 
Passover Bread
 
3 pints milk
 
1 pound butter
 
flour
 
Take milk, butter, and as much flour as needed to give it a body similar to pie dough. Divide into four parts and work each until it blisters; then roll out till about the thickness of pie dough. Score or prick with fork (like a pie shell). Bake at 350 degrees until slightly browned at the edges.
..............................................................................
 
Cheese Popover Puffs
 
1 C flour
 1/2 t salt
 1 C milk
 2 eggs
 1 T margarine, melted
 1/4 C shredded cheddar cheese
 
Combine all ingredients, except cheese. Beat at medium speed until smooth; stir in cheese. Heat a well-greased muffin pan in hot oven for 3 minutes. Spoon in batter, filling 2/3 full. Bake at 425 degrees for 15 minutes; reduce heat to 350 degrees and bake 25 minutes until golden brown. Serve immediately. Do not open door while baking!
.............................................................................................

Puri (East Indian Bread)
 
2 1/2 cups stone ground whole wheat flour
 1 1/4 teaspoons salt
 1/2 cup soft shortening
 1 1/3 cups yogurt
 
Mix all ingredients well. Roll to 1/8 inch thickness and cut in rounds with 4 inch cutter. Fry in hot oil (350 degrees) until puffed and brown. Drain on absorbent paper. Makes 36.
.................................................................................
 
Almond Bread
4 eggs
 
1 cup sugar
 
3/4 cup oil or butter
 
1 tablespoon almond extract
 
3 cups flour
 
1 small bag slivered almonds
 
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
 
Mix sugar, eggs, and 1 cup flour. Add oil or butter. Add remaining ingredients, pour into two greased bread pans. Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes. Remove from pans.
............................................................................
Chapatti

4 cups whole wheat flour
 
2 cups unbleached flour
 
1/2 pound soft butter
 
1 teaspoon honey (optional)
 
1 pint milk
 
ground sunflower and pumpkin seeds, as desired
 
Cut butter into flour. Add milk and work into dough. Roll as thin as you like. Cut into squares. Prick each square with a fork. Bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes.

............................................................................
Flour Tortillas

4 cups flour
 
1 ½ tsp salt
 
1/3 cup softened butter
 
1 – 1 ¼ cups water
 
Mix together first two ingredients. Cut in butter until crumbly. Pour in water. Stir with a fork until it makes a cohesive ball. Knead 20 times. Form into 12 balls. Roll each ball in a little flour and roll out into 7” circles as thick as you can. Cook in a hot pan about 30 seconds on each side.
....................................................................................

Corn Tortillas
 
2 cups Masa Harina tortilla flour
 1-1/4 cups warm water

In a medium mixing bowl, combine tortilla flour and water. Stir mixture together with your hands until dough is firm, but moist. (If necessary, add more water, 1 tablespoon at a time.) Let dough rest for 15 minutes.
 Divide the dough into 12 equal portions and shape each portion into a ball. Using a tortilla press or rolling pin, flatten each ball between 2 pieces of waxed paper to form a 6-inch circle. Carefully peel off top sheet of waxed paper. Place tortilla, paper side up, on a medium/high, ungreased skillet or griddle. As tortilla begins to heat, carefully peel off remaining sheet of waxed paper. Cook, turning occasionally for 2 to 2-1/2 minutes or until tortilla is dry and light brown (tortilla should still be soft). Wrap tortillas in foil if using immediately. Makes twelve 6-inch tortillas.
 
Make-Ahead Tip:
 To freeze tortillas, stack them with 2 layers of waxed paper between each. Wrap the stack in a moisture and vapor proof bag, foil, or freezer wrap. Seal tightly and freeze up to 1 month. Thaw completely before using.
 

Polenta Toasts
 
1/3 cup whole grain corn meal
 
1/3 cup regular corn meal
 
1/2 teaspoon salt or 1 tablespoon liquid aminos
 
2 1/2 cups water
 
Place cornmeal and salt in heavy 3 quart saucepan. Slowly whisk in the water (or aminos). Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly until mixture boils and becomes very thick (about 10 minutes). Heat may be lowered the last 3 or 4 minutes to prevent sticking. Stir very fast. Spray cookie sheet with olive oil and spread mixture to within 1 inch of edges. Do not cover. Refrigerate at least 4 hours. Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Cut polenta into squares and push apart slightly. Spray top with olive oil spray. Bake for 25 minutes on bottom oven shelf. Toasts should be lightly browned and easy to remove with a spatula. If not, bake 5 to 20 minutes longer.

.............................................
Unleavened Cornbread
 
1 cup cornmeal
 
1 cup flour
 
¼ cup sugar
 
1 tsp salt
 
1 egg
 
1 Tbs sour cream
 
¼ cup butter, melted
 
1 cup milk
 
Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Grease a 12 cup miffin pan or line with muffin papers. In a bowl, stir together the cornmeal, flour, sugar, and salt. Make a well in the cente, and pour in the egg, sour cream, butter, and milk. Stir until well blended. Spoon batter into prepared muffin cups. Bake for 15-20 minutes, until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.
 
 
 

Yowbarb

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Re: Foods for on the road: Hardtack, Pemmican and other ancient foods
« Reply #17 on: May 13, 2013, 11:12:09 AM »
Mother Earth News:

http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/hardtack-recipes-zmaz80mazraw.aspx#axzz2TCInMFrK

Hearty Hardtack Recipes
 Overcoming childhood ambivalence, the author discovered hardtack could be a delicious snack and came up with several hardtack recipes for variety's sake.
 

By Gail E. Johnson   March/April 1980

A childhood ration of seafaring tales—many of which described long voyages endured on a diet of hardtack—left me with ambivalent feelings about the long-time staple food. It was a pleasant surprise, then, to discover an old Swedish recipe that's both fast and easy . . . and produces delicious hardtack as well. What's more, one batch will make eight 12 inch diameter discs which are great served "hot from the pan" with butter and make very convenient snacks to enjoy while camping or backpacking, too. What follows is the original and several variations of hardtack recipes.

Plain Ol' Hardtack

To make a basic hardtack, mix 2 1/2 cups of old-fashioned oatmeal, 3 cups of unbleached flour, 1 1/2 teaspoons of salt, and 1 teaspoon of baking soda in a large bowl. Then, in a separate container, add 1 1/2 cups of buttermilk (or soured powdered milk mix) and 3 tablespoons of honey to 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons of melted bacon or sausage drippings . . . and combine this mixture with the dry ingredients. When the dough is thoroughly mixed, form it Into eight balls of equal size and roll each one out on a floured board (the thickness will depend on the size of your pans). Use a pegged rolling pin if such a (tool is available . . . if not, a standard rolling pin, jar, or large drinking glass will do.

Transfer each circle to a lightly greased pizza pan and pat and smooth the dough to fit. A meat tenderizing tool can be used to stipple—or dent—a pattern in the surface at this point if a pegged rolling pin wasn't used ... and you can mark the "pie" into squares, diamonds, or triangles with a regular pizza cutter, if desired.

Put the pans in the oven for 5 1/2 minutes at 450°F. Timing is crucial: The resulting "way bread" should be dry, but browned only around the edges.

When you remove your finished hardtack from the oven, let it stand for a moment .. . then use a pancake turner to place the discs on wire racks to cool, and put your next batch on the pans. (The pizza sheets will not need to be re-greased to bake subsequent discs of dough.)

Finally, the hearty flatbreads should be stored in tightly covered containers to keep them crisp.

Rye or Whole Wheat Hardtack

Substitute 2 cups of rye flour, or 2 cups of whole wheat flour, for 1 cup of the oatmeal and 1 cup of the unbleached flour called for in the basic recipe. You can please your taste buds with a variety of spices, too: Perhaps 1/2 teaspoon of garlic salt in the rye mixture or 3/4 teaspoon of caraway seeds and 3/4 teaspoon of sesame seeds in the whole wheat mix might produce a hardtack that your palate finds particularly appealing.

Buckwheat-Millet Hardtack

You might want to experiment by substituting 1 cup of buckwheat groats (kasha) for 1 cup of the basic recipe's oats, and 1 cup of millet (uncooked) for 1 cup of the unbleached flour . . . then adding 1/4 teaspoon more salt and spices as desired. The result will be a bit moist, as millet doesn't absorb liquid. (If you'd like a drier bread, compensate by mixing in an additional 1/2 cup of unbleached flour.)

Sunflower Nut Hardtack

For extra-crunchy hardtack, try using 1 cup of sunflower seeds (chopped) instead of 1 cup of the oatmeal called for in the basic recipe. (You can make the same substitution in the rye or whole wheat mixtures.)

Cornmeal Hardtack

Replace 1 cup of the unbleached flour and 1 cup of the oatmeal included in the basic recipe with a total of 2 cups of cornmeal. Or, if you're basing your conversion on the rye or whole wheat variations, you can simply let 2 cups of cornmeal replace 1 cup of rye (or 1 cup of whole wheat) and one cup of the remaining unbleached flour.

Any way you mix it, you'll find hardtack—which was once the traditional army ration and navy ration—to be a handy, hearty treat that's always nice to have around!


Yowbarb

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Re: Foods for on the road: Hardtack, Pemmican and other ancient foods
« Reply #18 on: May 30, 2017, 04:59:34 PM »
I just changed the name of this topic to include pemmican. 
A recipe from Sunnybug is at Reply #9

Yowbarb

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Re: Foods for on the road: Hardtack, Pemmican and other ancient foods
« Reply #19 on: May 30, 2017, 05:07:04 PM »
http://www.offthegridnews.com/how-to-2/how-to-make-pemmican-a-survival-superfood-that-can-last-50-years/

How To Make Pemmican: A Survival Superfood That Can Last 50 Years


Packed with calories and nutrition and able to be packed and stored for long periods, pemmican is often called the ultimate survival food.
Created by Native Americans and adopted by European explorers of the New World, pemmican is a concentrated blend of fat and protein from lean, dried meat. The word “pemmican” is derived from the Cree root word “pimi” for “fat” or “grease.” Traditionally, the meats used in pemmican included bison, moose, deer and elk.  Beef can be used as well.
The secret to pemmican’s long shelf life is in properly rendering the fat from the meat. The pemmican can be stored in airtight containers without refrigeration in a cool, dark and dry place. If made and stored property, it can last for years or even decades. There are reports of some pemmican lasting 50 or more years.
Let’s look at the steps to making pemmican.

1.  Dry the meat. Cut off all the fat, and then slice the meat as thinly as possible before placing it on a drying rack in full sunlight. Another option is to place the meat directly on your oven rack with the oven temperature at its lowest setting. The meat needs to be dry enough that it cracks when you try to bend it. Adding salt will extend the shelf life. The more salt you add, the longer it will last.
2.  Grind the meat. Now you need to grind the meat until it is powder form. If you do not have a food processor, mince the meat and then grind it in the blender. If you are in a survival situation, chop the meat into small bits and then crush it into a powder.
Discover The World’s Healthiest Storable Survival Food!
3.  Render the fat. Now heat the fat in a crockpot, in the oven or on the stove. Use a low setting for several hours, and be sure to stir the fat occasionally until it has stopped bubbling. Then pour it through a mesh strainer to filter out any pieces.
4.  Mix the meat with any dry extras. If you are using any nuts or dried fruit, such as raisins, dried cherries or cranberries, mix it with the dried meat in a large bowl (leaving room for the fat). Note: These extras reduce the shelf life.
5.  Add the fat. Next, add one part of fat per every two parts of the dried meat mixture (add more fat if needed). Slowly pour the hot liquefied fat into the meat mixture and stir well.
6.  Add any wet extras. If you are adding wet ingredients such as honey, maple syrup or peanut butter, mix them in now. If the mixture seems too wet, you can add a little almond meal to get it to your desired consistency. You also may add salt to taste if you like. Note: These extras will reduce the shelf life.
7. Form the pemmican. A popular method is to spread the mixture into a casserole dish. Let it get firm before cutting it into squares or bar sizes. If you prefer, you can form the mixture into balls.
8.  Store the pemmican. Once cut, place it into airtight containers and store them in a cool, dark and dry place. You also store your pemmican in zippered bags in your freezer.
There are many varieties of pemmican, but they all use the basic instructions.
Many other recipes begin with a 1:1:1 ratio of basic ingredients such as:

1 cup of dried meat
1 cup of dried fruit or berries
1 cup of melted animal fat


Pemmican is surprisingly filling and can supply energy for hours.
You can experiment to find the recipe that works well for you. Label the pemmican you make with the ingredients and proportions you used, so you will know what combinations work well and how you might want to tweak a certain recipe a little in the future.

http://www.offthegridnews.com/how-to-2/how-to-make-pemmican-a-survival-superfood-that-can-last-50-years/

ilinda

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Re: Foods for on the road: Hardtack, Pemmican and other ancient foods
« Reply #20 on: May 30, 2017, 06:28:26 PM »
The 1:1:1 ratio is so easy to remember!  Is there any reason why one could not substitute olive oil for animal fat?

Yowbarb

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Re: Foods for on the road: Hardtack, Pemmican and other ancient foods
« Reply #21 on: May 30, 2017, 10:40:47 PM »
The 1:1:1 ratio is so easy to remember!  Is there any reason why one could not substitute olive oil for animal fat?

I'm not an expert on it... I think the recipes with meat and animal fat are designed to give more food energy in a hard working, survival situation and would last longer, but that is just my guess.

Yowbarb

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Re: Foods for on the road: Hardtack, Pemmican and other ancient foods
« Reply #22 on: May 30, 2017, 10:42:06 PM »
I have been avoiding beef and pork fat for decades...
In a survival situation I would use whatever was available... especially if trying to feed skinny great -
grandkids.

Socrates

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SURVIVAL foods
« Reply #23 on: May 31, 2017, 01:52:50 AM »
I have been avoiding beef and pork fat for decades...
In a survival situation I would use whatever was available... especially if trying to feed skinny great -
grandkids.
That's why it's called "survival"...
Even intelligent swine and herbivorous rabbits will eat their own young if circumstances cause that to happen. And ancient accounts mention human survivors, as well, not only reverting to cannibalism but even to eating their own children.
Our reptilian brains do not care and though we've all lived in times of plenty all our lives, Maslow's pyramid still ultimately rules us all. So just be grateful if you can survive with your sanity intact, for if circumstances cause you to smash in your child's skull and eat it's brain, you ain't (personally) coming back from that...
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R.R. Book

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Re: Foods for on the road: Hardtack, Pemmican and other ancient foods
« Reply #24 on: May 31, 2017, 04:59:27 AM »
Barb, Thank you so much for the Pemmican recipe!  Can't wait to give it a try. :)