Author Topic: Healing plants, herbs and foods  (Read 39818 times)

ilinda

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods: Butterbur
« Reply #195 on: June 15, 2017, 03:13:12 PM »
The National Institutes of Health lists several studies on Butterbur (Petasites hybridus, Petasites officinales, Tussilago hybrida), also commonly known as coltsfoot, for the treatment of migraines and allergic rhinitis (hayfever).  A good overview is posted at the NIH National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health website: https://nccih.nih.gov/health/butterbur .  The site recommends that usage within dosing parameters is safe for up to 16 weeks at a time.

Studies:
https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/ntp/noms/support_docs/butterbur_nov2009.pdf (useful for migraines and hayfever, neuroprotective effects, endocrine metabolism, steriod, lowers BP, increases brain glutathione, blocks seizures, stomach protective.  Aerial parts are useful for antihistimine and anti-anaphylaxis effects, but not effective against skin allergies.   Tea not recommended from fresh leaves due to alkaloid content.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15623680 (migraines reduced by 48% at dose of 75mg twice a day - specifically the root was used)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20828319 (exerts antioxidant activity and improves lipid profiles)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14720270 (anti-inflammatory)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12859442 (up to 400 mg used safely)

The plant is a hardy perennial, with seeds available from Richter's in Canada and from private growers on websites such as Etsy.  If purchasing commercial capsules, look for "PA free" label, evidence that no toxic alkaloids are present.  If harvesting from your own plants, follow one of these methods to reduce alkaloid content: air drying, cooking, fermenting, long-term storage, chilling. 
Drawing from PFAF:
This article is just in the nick of time!  I used to grow coltsfoot, not realizing it is also known as butterbur, etc.  When we got the goats in 2010, they proceeded to wipe out many things I had growing, and over time I've been able to replace some, putting the new plantings inside cages and fences.

One thing about coltsfoot is that it loves to have wet feet and will even grow in a fen-like area.  I had beginner's luck, because when I got my first seeds, I planted it directly under a downspout, and in some black, rich soil that always seemed moist.  Coltsfoot did well there and spread and spread.

When the goats began to decimate it, I replanted it in two other areas, but neither did well, as I did not know about its water-loving qualities at the time.  Now, sadly, my 2014 seeds did not germinate this year, and now, happily I know it's still available at Richter's.  Yippee.

This is a good one to have for the anti-histamine effect, but it's wise to underdose until you know how much to use.  It's potent and can easily dry out your sinuses too much.

R.R. Book

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #196 on: June 15, 2017, 03:37:27 PM »
« Last Edit: June 15, 2017, 04:58:52 PM by R.R. Book »

Yowbarb

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #197 on: June 15, 2017, 08:49:18 PM »
Great posts, ilinda and R.R.
do you both make herbal tinctures?
All The Best,
Yowbarb

R.R. Book

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #198 on: June 16, 2017, 05:39:48 AM »
Hi Barb,

I've taken classes on making herbal tinctures and salves, taught by a neighboring family of women from among the "plain folk" here (plain meaning "not fancy" rather than "living on the plains").  They use traditional knowledge passed down for generations, with the eldest unmarried daughter also having left the farm to study for several years abroad at a botanical medicine institute, before returning to bring the knowledge back to our community.  Some of the techniques of the plain people are being studied by mainstream medicine (bone repair, treatment of third degree burns), and some may be suppressed by it (a Lyme class that they had scheduled to capacity was abruptly cancelled and never re-scheduled).  It was fun to tease them about stashing gin and vodka by the caseload for their tinctures, which we used in the classes, as the plain folk are culturally constrained from using alcohol ;)

That having been said, my preferred medicines to make at home are colloidal solutions brewed from minerals; teas and tisanes; and dried pulverized material that can be encapsulated in gelatin capsules using a simple device available from a health food store.  I also follow the plain women's advice of eating one fresh leaf per day of any medicinal herb that I may be growing and using at the time, unless the fresh herb is high in pyrrolizine alkaloids.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2017, 10:03:07 AM by R.R. Book »

Yowbarb

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #199 on: June 16, 2017, 03:28:49 PM »
Hi Barb,

I've taken classes on making herbal tinctures and salves, taught by a neighboring family of women from among the "plain folk" here (plain meaning "not fancy" rather than "living on the plains").  They use traditional knowledge passed down for generations, with the eldest unmarried daughter also having left the farm to study for several years abroad at a botanical medicine institute, before returning to bring the knowledge back to our community.  Some of the techniques of the plain people are being studied by mainstream medicine (bone repair, treatment of third degree burns), and some may be suppressed by it (a Lyme class that they had scheduled to capacity was abruptly cancelled and never re-scheduled).  It was fun to tease them about stashing gin and vodka by the caseload for their tinctures, which we used in the classes, as the plain folk are culturally constrained from using alcohol ;)

That having been said, my preferred medicines to make at home are colloidal solutions brewed from minerals; teas and tisanes; and dried pulverized material that can be encapsulated in gelatin capsules using a simple device available from a health food store.  I also follow the plain women's advice of eating one fresh leaf per day of any medicinal herb that I may be growing and using at the time, unless the fresh herb is high in pyrrolizine alkaloids.

R.R. Book what an impressive and wonderful reply.
That is so great, what you do!
:)

Yowbarb

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #200 on: July 16, 2017, 10:32:22 AM »
Yowbarb Note - this book is likely a really good reference:
...


Medical Herbalism: The Science Principles and Practices Of Herbal Medicine Hardcover – October 24, 2003
by David Hoffmann  (Author)
4.7 out of 5 stars    99 customer reviews  See all 4 formats and editions [link on page.]
                                                             Kindle eBook $40.99
                                                             Read with Our Free App          [link on page.]
 
Hardcover $42.46      27 Used from $32.81 40      New from $34.23
...
Yowbarb Note,
This is one excellent review of this book, posted on Amazon by Mr. Wheeler on December 10, 2016:


https://www.amazon.com/Medical-Herbalism-Principles-Practices-Medicine/dp/0892817496/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1500225672&sr=8-1&keywords=medical+herbalism+by+david+hoffman

"I own and have read many many books on herbalism, medicinal herbs and their uses, herbal medicine, etc. and this one, although its a literal textbook, is the most useful so far. I think it completes any collection on medicinal herb literature since it gives a recent, scientific explanation of WHY components of certain plants help certain conditions, without suggesting that it is only the isolated chemicals within plants that is therapeutic. Has a wonderful section on the organic chemistry which I find incredibly useful, since most books merely mention an active compound without showing/explaining exactly what it is and how it works in the body. Likewise most chemistry books do not go into any depth about compounds found in herbs, so this book is a great bridge between herbalism and the chemistry of medicine. I have taken an introductory year of organic chemistry and biochemistry so the information is very digestible- but for those who have not, I think this introduction to the most important ideas of organic chemistry and biochemistry as they relate to herbs may be a great gateway. There are numerous videos on each subject (like bonding or molecular structure) on youtube that can be used to supplement the information.
Even if one were to ignore the entire chemistry section, the rest of the book is well organized and full of very useful information, such as dosing, cross references of common/Latin plant names, explanations of common ailments, and a section on how to make remedies using the plants. Very highly recommended."

ilinda

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #201 on: July 16, 2017, 03:50:30 PM »
Great posts, ilinda and R.R.
do you both make herbal tinctures?
All The Best,
Yowbarb
Getting caught up and just now seeing this.

Yes, I make herbal tinctures.  In fact in the past couple of years I've begun to make homeopathic preps from some of the tinctures, and am experimenting right now (on myself) with the wild yam homeopathic preps, trying to find the correct dose for myself.  (Am seeing positive results, and now just looking for the optimum dose).  Am also working with another woman who needs something besides wild yam, and I made homeop. preps. from 1C through 12C for her, and she will experiment to see if that will do what she wants.  If not, we have several other herbs lined up to try.  There is never a lack of "things to try" in herbalism.

Also, I recently discovered organic wheat vodka, so I bought some for the alcohol tinctures, as I felt uncomfortable using Everclear anymore after thinking about the probable connection between Monsanto and Everclear made from GM corn. 

BTW, it's easy to get started in herbs.  Herbalist friend with formal training said in one of her talks that for someone interested in all of this, find 5 to 10 herbs that really interest and intrigue you,  particularly for their usefulness, then begin to study and grow and learn to use them.

ilinda

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #202 on: July 16, 2017, 04:19:39 PM »
Hi Barb,

I've taken classes on making herbal tinctures and salves, taught by a neighboring family of women from among the "plain folk" here (plain meaning "not fancy" rather than "living on the plains").  They use traditional knowledge passed down for generations, with the eldest unmarried daughter also having left the farm to study for several years abroad at a botanical medicine institute, before returning to bring the knowledge back to our community.  Some of the techniques of the plain people are being studied by mainstream medicine (bone repair, treatment of third degree burns), and some may be suppressed by it (a Lyme class that they had scheduled to capacity was abruptly cancelled and never re-scheduled).  It was fun to tease them about stashing gin and vodka by the caseload for their tinctures, which we used in the classes, as the plain folk are culturally constrained from using alcohol ;)

That having been said, my preferred medicines to make at home are colloidal solutions brewed from minerals; teas and tisanes; and dried pulverized material that can be encapsulated in gelatin capsules using a simple device available from a health food store.  I also follow the plain women's advice of eating one fresh leaf per day of any medicinal herb that I may be growing and using at the time, unless the fresh herb is high in pyrrolizine alkaloids.
Wonder if TPTB or TPTW clamped down on the Lyme lecture.  Guess we'll never know.

How do you make your colloidal solutions brewed from minerals?  I'm wanting to do somethng similar with stinging nettle, one very useful, high-mineral plant, but have never actually worked it into any preps, in spite of having grown it for some years now.  I once saw Susun Weed tak about making some concoction in which she simmered stinging nettle for what seemed like hours, then strained it and stored in fridge, using only small amount at a time.  But details are lost now.


R.R. Book

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #203 on: July 17, 2017, 01:31:10 PM »
Hi Ilinda,

To make a colloidal solution, you can order a foot of jeweler's wire in whatever metal you want to use (the precious metals have the most medicinal value as colloids), in the gauge range of between maybe 16 at the thickest and 22 at the thinnest.  Thicker gauges should last a lifetime.  Be sure to get .999 fine wire so that you're not mixing a baser metal into the colloid.  This is the most expensive part of your purchases besides a way to recharge batteries, if any.

A typical colloidal silver generator can be obtained inexpensively on the web, and might require 3 9-volt batteries for a total of 27 volts' power.  For prepping, you might either want to choose lithium batteries or NiMH (nickel metal hydride) or NiCD (nickel cadmium).  Nickel batteries have two important advantages over lithium: (1) if damaged, they don't produce fires that can climb vertically like lithium batteries, and (2) they can be discharged (including self-discharge from sitting idle) down to zero power and still recover their rechargeability.

For prepping purposes, you'll then either need to stock up on batteries or consider a way to recharge batteries.  Some colloidal silver generators come with their own solar panel, but that forces you into dependence upon sunlight at a time when volcanic ash and other debris may be clouding skies for a lengthy period of time.  I've opted to attach a small generator box to my stationary bike and hook it up to a 12v DC power pack.  Whatever 12v battery you might choose, if any, needs to be a deep cycle battery in order to survive continuous recharging - a car battery charger may only supply a high voltage charge for a limited number of times.  Max probably is a good person to consult on this aspect - Max, could you please weigh in, or anyone else who uses 12v DC?.  An alternative is to get the colloidal silver generator now and make up lots of jars of solution to put away safely (buried if necessary, as Barb has suggested), and then not worry at this late date about power generating equipment, unless it's in the budget.

Back to making colloids: The only other materials you need on hand are distilled water, a jar with coated metal, plastic or glass lid, and saline solution, which you can make yourself from sea salt and water.  Wide-mouth canning jars are good, but the narrower mouths potentially place electrodes too close together.  Cut your foot of jeweler's wire into two 6" lengths.  Bend the tips of one end of each so that they'll hang over the edge of the jar.  Then set them aside.

Fill your jar about 3/4 full with distilled water and add 4 drops of saline per quart to make the water electroconductive.  Close the lid and shake vigorously.  Never use a metal utensil with a colloid.  Some recipes call for the water to be heated, but it's not necessary in my opinion (I do it only for colloidal gold).  If you do choose to heat the water, either use the jar in a double boiler or the water without jar directly in a glass or an enamel coated pan with no chips in it. 

If making colloidal silver, once the saline solution is added and the jar shaken, add your bent electrodes over opposite sides of the jar rim, and make sure the immersed ends go straight down into the water, so that they remain away from one-another's energy field, lest they cancel each other out.  Attach the alligator clips to the small portion of each wire that extends outside the mouth of the jar and be sure that the unit lights up.  At this point, it is enjoyable to engage children to watch hydrogen being displaced from the solution as bubbles form on one electrode, while a swirling cloud of silver forms in the water around the other electrode.  Consult your favorite recipe for length of time to "brew" the solution before detaching from the generator (can Google this). 

If making colloidal gold for the purpose of vivid dreaming, sharpened cognition, or potential cellular radiation shield, recipes usually call for a little sugar such as from maple syrup, as well as a citric acid source such as a squeeze of lemon.  The carbohydrate coats gold molecules and aids their transport in the body, while blocking them from cluttering the cell nucleus unless the cell is dying.  Otherwise, the procedure is the same.  Other precious metals, such as platinum, palladium, ruthenium, rhodium and irridium may also have medicinal properties, especially vs. cancer.

When finished, cap and shake the bottle vigorously before taking any, especially if it has sat on the shelf, as entropy will cause colloidal molecules to settle out of solution toward the bottom.  Shaking reinvigorates the ions.  Always store colloids in the dark and at room temperature away from refrigeration.

When putting your equipment away, take a plastic wool pot scrubbing pad and wipe the oxidized silver from your electrodes.  Afterward, if you attach the alligator clips to either side of the pad, that will prevent the clips from touching together in storage and inadvertently discharging the batteries of a unit that doesn't have an on/off switch.   

As far as stinging nettle or any other medicinal plant, nature has already created the colloid within the plant.  For plants that you wouldn't eat raw, you only need either to brew it in hot water or bruise and soak it to get the colloid out.  If you use distilled water, the emptiness of the water will permit more of the nutrients from your plant to be infused into your solution.  :)

Attaching photo: I don't recommend these jars with bailing wire for brewing colloids, but it's what I had on hand and I've been using this one for two decades!
« Last Edit: July 17, 2017, 04:05:58 PM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #204 on: July 17, 2017, 02:42:37 PM »
Thanks for the lengthy explanations.  This will be on my list of things to do.  I like the idea of making solutions now and storing them in the dark for future needs.

Yowbarb

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #205 on: July 17, 2017, 02:49:21 PM »
Thanks for the lengthy explanations.  This will be on my list of things to do.  I like the idea of making solutions now and storing them in the dark for future needs.

Ditto to all that!
:)

Yowbarb

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #206 on: July 17, 2017, 02:50:52 PM »
Great posts, ilinda and R.R.
do you both make herbal tinctures?
All The Best,
Yowbarb
Getting caught up and just now seeing this.

Yes, I make herbal tinctures.  In fact in the past couple of years I've begun to make homeopathic preps from some of the tinctures, and am experimenting right now (on myself) with the wild yam homeopathic preps, trying to find the correct dose for myself.  (Am seeing positive results, and now just looking for the optimum dose).  Am also working with another woman who needs something besides wild yam, and I made homeop. preps. from 1C through 12C for her, and she will experiment to see if that will do what she wants.  If not, we have several other herbs lined up to try.  There is never a lack of "things to try" in herbalism.

Also, I recently discovered organic wheat vodka, so I bought some for the alcohol tinctures, as I felt uncomfortable using Everclear anymore after thinking about the probable connection between Monsanto and Everclear made from GM corn. 

BTW, it's easy to get started in herbs.  Herbalist friend with formal training said in one of her talks that for someone interested in all of this, find 5 to 10 herbs that really interest and intrigue you,  particularly for their usefulness, then begin to study and grow and learn to use them.

ilinda, excellent post, inspirational.
:)

R.R. Book

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #207 on: July 17, 2017, 03:29:16 PM »
Ilinda, I'd be interested in learning more about how you make your homeopathics.  I understand the principle of more dilute being stronger, but would like to learn more.  Would you mind sharing your favorite 5 or 10 herbs, and how you go about diluting them to different strengths?

ilinda

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #208 on: July 18, 2017, 05:59:25 PM »
Ilinda, I'd be interested in learning more about how you make your homeopathics.  I understand the principle of more dilute being stronger, but would like to learn more.  Would you mind sharing your favorite 5 or 10 herbs, and how you go about diluting them to different strengths?
Here is an example of wild yam:
1 dig wild yam; then dry the whole root on a tabletop, out of the sun, for several weeks although it probably doesn't take that long.  It's as hard as rock or concrete.
2 try to pulverize it, which you will find impossible due to its hardness; so find the best way to pulverize one "arm" or "leg" of it.  I use a steel file, and have tried many things, but always come back to the file.
3 after pulverization, you have a pile of powder and this is your base for tincture.
4 make a tincture out of this powder.  For example, I usually make 10% tinctures, IIRC, although I've made 5% before.  IOW, for a small experimental batch of tincture, weigh out 1 gram of your powder, and add this 1 g. powder to 10 g. alcohol such as organic wheat vodka.  Place the powder into the alcohol in a large enough container (has headroom).
5 shake this container vigorously about 100X, at least 2X/day, storing it out of light and heat.
6 Shake your tincture 2X daily for at least a month, preferably two weeks or more.  (Some say 2 weeks is enough, but I do one month.)
7 After the tincture is "done" you may decant and save the clear liquid, and send the crude pulp to the compost pile.  (I leave it much longer.)
8 The clear liquid you decanted into a very clean container is the beginnings of your homeopathic dilutions.
9 Let's say you should now have about 10 grams of liquid (alcohol that contains many dissolved phytochemicals from the wild yam).
10 Decide whether you want to do "X" or "C" dilutions.  I do "C" because that's what Hannemann (sp) did.  Then decide "how far" you want to do with it.  My first homeopathic remedy I made into 30 jars, 1C through 30C.
11 Let's pretend we will do only 12 jars, of 1C through 12C;  To make our first jar, 1C, (1 in 100), we take 1 ml of our tincture, and place it in 99 ml. of appropriate solvent, which in this case is organic wheat vodka, then succuss 40X.  Now you have your first homeopathic dilution, a 1C Wild Yam prep. or 1C Wild Yam remedy or 1C Wild Yam dilution. 
12 now to make your 2C dilution, do this:  take 1 ml from your 1C jar, add it to your jar labeled "2C", which already contains 99 ml organic wheat vodka.  Now succuss 40X
13 you continue this with each numbered diluion.  When finished, you will have many remedies for many uses.  Also, remember that solids, such as sulfur powder can be made into homeopathicd preps, w/o the use of alcohol,  but which use galactose, IIRC.  There is more to homeopathy, much more, but I've tried to give a tiny preview

ilinda

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Re: Healing plants, herbs and foods
« Reply #209 on: July 18, 2017, 06:06:39 PM »
This is an addendum.  I forgot to list any of my favorite herbs, as I have so many I'm not sure I can narrow it down that much but will try, and they are not in any particular order:
1. Milk thistle
2. Hops
3. Foxglove
4. Lily of the Valley
5. Stinging Nettle
6. Holy Basil
7. Coltsfoot
8. Pleurisy Root
9. Black Cohosh
10. Wild yam

And as a BTW, the herbs that are water soluble, don't need to be in an alcoholic tincture first, but often in vinegar.  I'm no expert on homeopathy but decided to take the plunge and teach myself from what I've read and seen.  With my using the wild yam, I am seeing slow, but definite, improvements in the conditions I wanted to change.
If you have any questions, please yell.