Author Topic: Extreme Weather Australia.  (Read 1692 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: Extreme Weather Australia.
« Reply #15 on: December 11, 2016, 10:15:40 PM »
Kyirrie I just wanted to warn you, n case you did not see the new Topic, Thunderstorm Asthma and how it is hitting Australia.  http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?topic=6418.0

Please protect yourself and your family with inhalers ready to use, masks, oxygen etc.
If possible order some steroids online or if anyone already uses them, stock up... Send me msg or email me at home, too.
All The Best,
Barb T.  Barb2011x@gmail.com

ilinda

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Re: Extreme Weather Australia.
« Reply #16 on: February 20, 2017, 03:13:17 PM »
(From www.desdemonadespair.net  and before this was edited the article included pictures of all the bats that are dying in the trees, from the extreme heat.  Sympathies to every living thing in Australia!)

 Damage mounts after Australia wildfires and record heat – “To put it simply, conditions are off the old scale. It is without precedent in NSW.”
1 comments Posted by Jim at Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Aerial view of a bushfire in New South Wales, Australia, 12 February 2017. While bushfires ravage the Australian landscape every year, in 2017, land and sea temperatures were pushed up due to climate change, increasing the severity of fire seasons. Photo: AFP Photo

    SYDNEY, 12 February 2017 (AFP) – Australia was counting the cost to property and livestock Monday after firefighters battled weekend blazes in some of the hottest conditions on record.

    At least 19 homes were destroyed in eastern Australia as emergency teams were sent out to assess the damage after a "catastrophic" weekend saw over 100 fire outbreaks, with 2,500 firefighters deployed and thousands more on standby.

    About 80 fires continued to burn Monday, with around a quarter still uncontained, said New South Wales (NSW) state Rural Fire Service Commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons, as conditions began to cool.

    "We know that there are going to be homes lost. We know that there are going to be plenty of other buildings that have been destroyed.

    "There is machinery that has been destroyed and … we are talking about livestock that has been destroyed as well," he told reporters Monday, without giving numbers.

    While bushfires ravage the Australian landscape every year, land and sea temperatures have been pushed up due to climate change, increasing the severity of fire seasons.

    A statewide NSW average temperature of 44 degrees Celsius (111 degrees Fahrenheit) on Saturday set a new February record, while temperatures above 47 were recorded across some parts of the state on Sunday. [more]

Australia fires ease as damage mounts after record heat

Record temperatures in Australia on 9 February 2017. Scale at right is shown in Celsius. The darkest red ranges from 38 to 46 degrees C, or 100 to 116 degrees F. Graphic: Australia Bureau of Meteorology

    By Chloe Farand
    11 February 2017

    (The Independent) – Authorities in Australia are facing the “worst possible fire conditions” and have declared a “catastrophic” fire danger over the weekend with the country engulfed in a series record-breaking heat wave.

    The states of New South Wales and Queensland have felt sweltering temperatures, exceeding 40C, in recent days.

    Up to 66 temperature records were broken in the New South Wales with the hottest temperature recorded in Ivanhoe at 47.6C.

    At one point 49 fires were burning across the state of New South Wales,17 of which were not under control. 

    In a press conference, New South Wales rural fire commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons said  “This is not a usual fire day, this is as bad as it gets.

    "To put it simply [the conditions] are off the old scale. It is without precedent in NSW,” he said. […]

    The fire and rescue authorities in New South Wales are anticipating a “catastrophic danger” of fires throughout the weekend with areas of “severe and extreme fire danger”. [more]

Australia faces 'catastrophic' fire danger as temperatures reach reach record levels in heatwave

  (Note:  47.6 deg. C is about 117.68 F. temperature).

Yowbarb

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Yowbarb

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Re: Extreme Weather Australia.
« Reply #18 on: March 26, 2017, 02:04:01 PM »
Stay safe, all you Australia Members!
Jimfarmer posted this link in his NEWS Board:
...

https://www.sott.net/article/346341-Cyclone-Debbie-forces-evacuations-in-Queensland-Australia

Cyclone Debbie forces evacuations in Queensland, Australia

Sky News Australia
Sun, 26 Mar 2017 04:06 UTC

Queensland is preparing for the worst tropical cyclone since Yasi six years ago, and authorities are warning residents that they need to act now as Monday will be too late.

Authorities have begun evacuating parts of the Whitsunday region as cyclone Debbie continues to bear down on the north Queensland coastline.

The Bureau of Meteorology expects 'the very destructive core' of Debbie to cross the coast between Townsville and Proserpine as a category 4 early on Tuesday morning, with winds up to 260km/h and flash flooding.

More than 1000 emergency services personnel have already been sent to the region.

Flights to north east Queensland have been grounded with Jetstar, Virgin and Qantas cancelling flights to and from Townsville airport for Monday and Tuesday.

The airlines have also cancelled some flights into and out of Mackay airport.
All flights to Hamilton Island are cancelled for Monday.

The Queensland Fire and Emergency Service issued a storm tide watch and act alert this afternoon for Dingo Beach, Conway Beach, Cape Upstart, Bowen, Airlie Beach and Shute Harbour.

State Disaster Coordinator Michael Gollschewski said Sunday was the day to finalise preparation.
'Tomorrow will be too late,' he told a media conference.

He said it was not possible to shelter from a storm surge and people in low-lying area should be prepared to evacuate.

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said schools between Ayr and Proserpine would be shut from Monday.

Tropical Cyclone Debbie intensified to a category 2 late on Saturday night in the Coral Sea and is moving slowing to the south, southwest.
There are concerns that by the time Debbie hits the coast, it could be a category 5 - the highest level.

A cyclone watch zone for residents living between Ayr and St Lawrence - including Bowen, Mackay and the Whitsunday Islands - remains in place.

Debbie will develop into a category 3 later on Sunday, bringing strong gales to the region.

Queensland Fire and Emergency Services Commissioner Katarina Carroll again on Sunday urged residents of the region to make sure they use Sunday to prepare for the arrival of Debbie.

'I come from that part of the world, I have been in a number of cyclones as a responder and please don't be complacent. These can be quite devastating,' Commissioner Carroll told the Nine Network on Sunday.

Emergency crews have already been sent in to areas between Townsville and Mackay awaiting the arrival of Debbie, which could be a category four or five when it crosses the coast late on Monday or early Tuesday.

The Queensland Disaster Management Committee met earlier on Sunday.
Coordination centres in Cairns, Innisfail, Townsville and Mackay have also been activated.

The Queensland Fire and Emergency Services have deployed 50 staff from its Disaster Assistance and Response Team to Cairns to bolster local crews.

AAP

Yowbarb

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Re: Extreme Weather Australia.
« Reply #19 on: March 28, 2017, 06:02:01 AM »
Video:

https://weather.com/news/news/tropical-cyclone-debbie-queensland-australia-impacts

Tropical Cyclone Debbie Crashes Ashore on Australia's Queensland Coast; Thousands Lose Power