Author Topic: Pompeii - TV programs, other sources of info  (Read 1092 times)

Yowbarb

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Pompeii - TV programs, other sources of info
« on: March 15, 2013, 08:09:23 AM »
On MILTV - Military TV Channel 125 right now 11-12 Pompeii -Back from the Dead
« Last Edit: March 15, 2013, 08:17:52 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Pompeii - TV programs, other sources of info
« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2013, 08:14:54 AM »
http://military.discovery.com/tv-shows/tv-schedule.htm Military TV Schedule  the Pompeii show not listed...not sure why...
It is on Channel 125 right now.
- Yowbarb

« Last Edit: March 15, 2013, 08:17:32 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Pompeii - TV programs, other sources of info
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2013, 08:27:27 AM »
Pompeii - as far as the archaeologists can determine - goes back to about 800 BC. The city has various layers, showing earlier cataclysms... Earlier than the one we commonly discuss from 79 BC.
- Yowbarb
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pompeii

History
 
Early history
 
The archaeological digs at the site extend to the street level of the 79 AD volcanic event; deeper digs in older parts of Pompeii and core samples of nearby drillings have exposed layers of jumbled sediment that suggest that the city had suffered from other seismic events before the eruption. Three sheets of sediment have been found on top of the lava that lies below the city and, mixed in with the sediment, archaeologists have found bits of animal bone, pottery shards and plants. Carbon dating has determined the oldest of these layers to be from the 8th–6th centuries BC (around the time the city was founded). The other two strata are separated either by well-developed soil layers or Roman pavement, and were laid in the 4th century BC and 2nd century BC. It is theorized that the layers of the jumbled sediment were created by large landslides, perhaps triggered by extended rainfall.[3]