Author Topic: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?  (Read 5930 times)

Yowbarb

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What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« on: August 08, 2013, 10:18:36 PM »
Although there are many other topics and lists, I just wanted to share some thoughts on
some of the most immediate items or goods to get together to help a person get through an emergency.
Whether the person is going to stick it out where they are or leave to a safer location, many of the items would be the same.
Obviously if there is already a survival place stocked with supplies there wouldn't be much need to haul a bunch of goods. If it is time to bug out, and there is enough room for some supplies, take as many as you can particularly water.
•   A sturdy vehicle if you are driving
•   Extra Identification for each group member kept in the glove compartment of the vehicle.
•   Cash. ATMs might not work.
•   "jerry cans" of gasoline -the European type cans have a more secure lid.
•   Cover up the cans with a tarp etc.
•   Water bottles for each person
•   any food you still need to take to the survival location
•   individual backpacks for each person, which have water and juice in them.
•   adults will have their ID and their prescriptions.
•   Baby supplies, diapers, books and toys for children
•   tools for the vehicle such as jacks, spare tires, ropes, winches. A shovel.
•   Fire extinguisher
•   Weapons hidden.
•   carry permits if that will work.
•   larger packs if the group ends up having to walk into the location
•   rain ponchos
•   space blankets
•   fire starting supplies
•   walky talkies
•   whistles.
•   food and water for your pets.
•   Carrier for a cat.
................


Add your ideas here,
Yowbarb

Yowbarb

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2013, 11:19:35 AM »
Yowbarb Note, RE Survival tools to better your odds:

Whether you are on the move with a big backpack - or at your shelter location getting things together, these items should always be on hand:

Water, nutrition and warmth
•   Bottled water
•   A container to catch water or get it from a stream/Water purification tablets
•   Emergency food bars
•   Space blankets
•   Fire starting items [ http://www.practicalsurvivor.com/fireintherain ]

Campground hygiene area:
•   Hand sanitizing wipes
•   Body wipes
•   TP and Kleenex       

Campground cooking:
•   Small campground pot and tiny grill to put it on
•   Instant coffee, soups cocoa, etc.
•   A few MREs

Clothes washing:
•   Twine to make temporary clothesline
•   A bar of hand laundry soap

Med kit
•   Iodine,  bandaids etc.
•   Mosquito spray
•   Benedryl capsules
•   Aspirin, etc.

Sleep area
•   Space blanket
•   Small tarp
•   Small tent
•   Inflatable tiny pillow

Defense
•   Big sharp knife
•   Pepper spray or mace
•   Weapon of some kind
•   Taser

Direction  compass, map, etc.
...........   

Yowbarb

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2014, 11:40:42 AM »
A cloak of invisibility would come in handy too, eh? Costs too much, though.

steedy

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2014, 12:18:31 PM »
How many times could I have used a cloak of invisibility?!  But seriously, one thing that I have found very helpful in any type of emergency is the ability to keep a cool head.  You don't know you can do this until some event happens to you.  For instance, a number of years ago I was alone and choked on something.  I had no way to get help and I knew I only had minutes before I died.  This quiet calm of very clear thinking took over and I got myself out of that jam.

Whatever that ability is called, it has come in handy over the years.  One of the worst things that people can do in emergencies is panic.  Once that takes over, it's pretty much over for you.  If I knew how people could practice staying calm, and cool headed, I would encourage everyone to do it.

Yowbarb

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #4 on: July 22, 2014, 04:52:05 PM »
How many times could I have used a cloak of invisibility?!  But seriously, one thing that I have found very helpful in any type of emergency is the ability to keep a cool head.  You don't know you can do this until some event happens to you.  For instance, a number of years ago I was alone and choked on something.  I had no way to get help and I knew I only had minutes before I died.  This quiet calm of very clear thinking took over and I got myself out of that jam.

Whatever that ability is called, it has come in handy over the years.  One of the worst things that people can do in emergencies is panic.  Once that takes over, it's pretty much over for you.  If I knew how people could practice staying calm, and cool headed, I would encourage everyone to do it.

Your story brought tears to my eyes. One night, all by myself I choked on a batch of homemade cold med. I had concocted... baked lemon etc. Just too much lemon fiber for my type of throat (chronic bronchitis) I went forward onto the top of a hard chair with my solar plexus area - and managed to get my throat opened up. Then with some water it was OK. PS I always strain the pulp out but I must have tasted a raw batch. It was just for me...My kids arely even had the sniffles but I had long term bronchitis with the choking risk that goes with it... (The back of the throat gets rough and catches food particles.) I learned to be cvareful if I was eating chips etc.

All other times I have choked I did need some assistance...My kids and I have used the Heimlich maneuver a few times on people to help them... no one perished on  my watch...
I am so glad you managed to stay calm and get through that...

steedy

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2014, 07:35:49 AM »
Choking is probably the scariest thing I've gone through.

Yowbarb

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #6 on: July 26, 2014, 09:52:47 PM »
Choking is probably the scariest thing I've gone through.

Me, too.

PXSpring

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #7 on: August 05, 2014, 11:28:52 AM »
A good pair of hiking boots - I bought a pair of Keen's and they fit my foot like a glove and also good socks.  Clothes that are light that can allow you to perspire and let that out but also hold in heat when it gets cold - and even in rainy situations - clothes that will dry quickly. 

Dehy or freeze dried food to put in your backpack, a good water filter (although you can make your own with coal, rocks and sand) in a quick type of additive to cleanse the water is better than filtering your water over a couple of hours or even days.  Prison planet has a straw type of water filter and drops - I'm sure there are other places too. 

Iodine because you don't know if these nuclear plants are going to hold up... which I highly doubt it.  The nascent iodine is best to use - again prison planet offers this and I actually use daily because I live on the west coast and Fukushima.

Rope, tarp and a good knife.  A good climbing rope may get you out of some tough situations.  Bungee cords are very useful as well - tying things down.


steedy

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #8 on: August 05, 2014, 04:42:06 PM »
I've got to learn how to dehydrate food.  I have a dehydrator, but just never have gotten around to using it.  I think it's because I focus more on canning. 

ilinda

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #9 on: August 05, 2014, 06:46:00 PM »
I've got to learn how to dehydrate food.  I have a dehydrator, but just never have gotten around to using it.  I think it's because I focus more on canning.
We also have a dehydrator, Excalibur, IIRC, but I prefer to sun-dry food when possible.  A neighbor gave us two stainless steel scraps, each about 4' long by about 1 1/2' wide and I lay cheesecloth or other thin cotton fabric on it, preferably sheer, then the slices or cubes of veggies such as tomatoes, okra, peppers, squash, watermelon, etc., and the list is endless of what you can dry. 

The only downside to sundrying these days is chemtrail fallout.  But if you are without power, that will be your only way, so it might be good to get the knack of it now.  I put the stainless steel "trays" on sawhorses, or on the engiine compartment of a pickup truck, or on top of a vehicle--car or truck.  Works best if sunny all day, and get the trays out early and bring them in as sun goes down, keeping them safe from raccoons, etc., at night by keeping indoors till next morning.  I have found tomatoes if cut small and thin enough, will dry in two days, and peppers the same, although they are almost dry in one day if the thin-walled type.  Learn by experience.
 
Hope this helps.

steedy

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #10 on: August 06, 2014, 11:04:09 AM »
I was wondering how to dry veges and stuff without electricity.  I've dried parsley and other herbs using cooling racks and putting them in my car for a couple days.  It works great for that stuff, but then again, I just crush up the dried leaves and store them like that.  I hadn't tried drying in the sun yet.  Maybe I will experiment using my car again.  That should keep critters out.  Thanks.


Yowbarb

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #12 on: August 07, 2014, 09:52:13 PM »
I was wondering how to dry veges and stuff without electricity.  I've dried parsley and other herbs using cooling racks and putting them in my car for a couple days.  It works great for that stuff, but then again, I just crush up the dried leaves and store them like that.  I hadn't tried drying in the sun yet.  Maybe I will experiment using my car again.  That should keep critters out.  Thanks.

steedy - sounds good. It seems like it should get hot enough in a parked car to dry veges.
I would suggest - as with any drying - to put some kind of fine screen or mesh over the box of sliced fruits and veges.
Good Luck,
Yowbarb


Yowbarb

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #14 on: October 26, 2014, 12:44:22 AM »
Miscellaneous ideas:
A few things which IMHO would increase a person's odds of surviving are:
•   A vehicle with enough room to carry some things in the back.
•   A luggage rack in top. Cover belongings with a tarp with fire-retardant spray on the top.
•   In the back of the SUV, van, truck, whatever:  Put bungees, tarps, ropes to cover things in the rack.
•   Keep bulletproofing spray and fireproofing spray in the back - and use these when you do have to bug out.
•   Kevlar skirts over the tires – at least the back tires but all four if you can.
•   Waterproof any papers, IDs, maps and important docs.
•   First aid kits in car.
•   Some army-style cans of gas.
•   Backpacks, bicycles ready in vehicle -  in case roads are impassable and vehicles fail.
•   Flotation jackets in vehicle.
•   Ropes, pulleys, shovels to help with bad roads.
•   Flashlights, lanterns etc.
•   Water, food, flashlight, jacket and space blanket in backpack for each person.
•   Sanitary hand wipes and –
•   bathroom wipes.
•   Walky-talkies.
•   Something to quickly make a travois out of, for pulling supplies and people.
•   Extra Drivers Licenses, IDs, maps, lights in glove compartment.
•   Guns and knives hidden from view.