Author Topic: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?  (Read 6360 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #15 on: November 10, 2015, 11:20:38 PM »
A good pair of hiking boots - I bought a pair of Keen's and they fit my foot like a glove and also good socks.  Clothes that are light that can allow you to perspire and let that out but also hold in heat when it gets cold - and even in rainy situations - clothes that will dry quickly. 

Dehy or freeze dried food to put in your backpack, a good water filter (although you can make your own with coal, rocks and sand) in a quick type of additive to cleanse the water is better than filtering your water over a couple of hours or even days.  Prison planet has a straw type of water filter and drops - I'm sure there are other places too. 

Iodine because you don't know if these nuclear plants are going to hold up... which I highly doubt it.  The nascent iodine is best to use - again prison planet offers this and I actually use daily because I live on the west coast and Fukushima.

Rope, tarp and a good knife.  A good climbing rope may get you out of some tough situations.  Bungee cords are very useful as well - tying things down.

PXSpring - belated acknowledgement of your post.
You have some good suggestions.
- Yowbarb

Yowbarb

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #16 on: January 01, 2016, 02:08:20 AM »
There are a few items which would increase a person's chances of surviving an emergency.
Note - this is for surviving on the move, bugging out to another location. I put together a brief recap from previous posts:

Yowbarb

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #17 on: January 01, 2016, 03:06:40 AM »
PS fire extinguisher in car and trunk both.
At least two large mountain back packs in case of vehicle failure  - or - if you have to pack in to the location.
Note: Camo car covers on car if have to leave it.
Drive it or push it under some trees.
Canteens which fasten to belt.
Hunting knives.
Kerchief, bandana for each person.
Gas masks in car.

enlightenme

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #18 on: January 01, 2016, 04:40:27 AM »
Excellent reminders!!  Thanks Barb!!  ;D

Yowbarb

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #19 on: January 08, 2016, 12:17:03 PM »
What no comments on the Norm Reedus pic. Hehe.
One of my faves.
:)

Yowbarb

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #20 on: April 10, 2016, 09:40:18 PM »
Excellent reminders!!  Thanks Barb!!  ;D

Come back! We need you!
:)

Socrates

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most important items, shortlist
« Reply #21 on: June 12, 2017, 10:39:35 PM »
Sometimes ya have to make do since you have to go on foot and heavy bags will slow you down when speed may be of the essence... So what would be BEST to take along if you only have a chance to pick a few things?
So this is not a 72-hour list that's based on the expectation that things will 'get back to normal' after a while; this is about surviving a 'stone-age-event'.

I say your best survival tools, if i had to name 3, would be:
- your dog
- a tent
- hatchet/tomohawk head [i.e. handle is good to have but can be replaced]

Why these?
- if you don't get dog, i can't explain it...
- you can find things to insulate against cold, but stopping wind is paramount to keeping out weather (as well as critters)
- a knife is great but a tomahawk or hatchet in many ways more versatile.

Next, let's say you can carry a few more items; how about:
- a guinea pig
- creditcard-sized fresnel lense
- a small stash of essential seeds [like corn, beets, etc.]
- magnesium fire starter

What else should we be thinking of that won't slow you down and increase your chances for survival and starting a new life from scratch? But only well-considered choices, not long lists (that are probably wishful thinking anyway...).
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Yowbarb

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Re: most important items, shortlist
« Reply #22 on: June 12, 2017, 11:18:50 PM »
Sometimes ya have to make do since you have to go on foot and heavy bags will slow you down when speed may be of the essence... So what would be BEST to take along if you only have a chance to pick a few things?
So this is not a 72-hour list that's based on the expectation that things will 'get back to normal' after a while; this is about surviving a 'stone-age-event'.

I say your best survival tools, if i had to name 3, would be:
- your dog
- a tent
- hatchet/tomohawk head [i.e. handle is good to have but can be replaced]

Why these?
- if you don't get dog, i can't explain it...
- you can find things to insulate against cold, but stopping wind is paramount to keeping out weather (as well as critters)
- a knife is great but a tomahawk or hatchet in many ways more versatile.

Next, let's say you can carry a few more items; how about:
- a guinea pig
- creditcard-sized fresnel lense
- a small stash of essential seeds [like corn, beets, etc.]
- magnesium fire starter

What else should we be thinking of that won't slow you down and increase your chances for survival and starting a new life from scratch? But only well-considered choices, not long lists (that are probably wishful thinking anyway...).

Socrates: The list I had posted -  Reply #16 - is pretty basic stuff.
To be loaded into a vehicle. ID, gas cans etc.
Obviously not a list for a bugout on foot...
I get it that bugging out on foot may happen for many people...
Surviving on the Move may have some lists of a shorter variety...
Your short list is good...

R.R. Book

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #23 on: June 13, 2017, 04:19:47 AM »
I love your list, Socrates, especially the dog as #1.  Totally get that. :)

Lots of reasons to have dog as #1:
Protection
Hunting
Companionship
Warmth
Small load carrier

Quote
What else should we be thinking of that won't slow you down and increase your chances for survival and starting a new life from scratch? But only well-considered choices, not long lists (that are probably wishful thinking anyway...).

Water dish for dog and canteen for U maybe?

Socrates

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Re: Water
« Reply #24 on: June 13, 2017, 06:12:33 AM »
Water dish for dog and canteen for U maybe?
Thinking survival, the dog can fend for itself. I plan to be feeding mine rabbit, but will also be about teaching it to kill the rabbit him-/herself, as well as getting used to it as a common source of food.

Again, a wonderful source once taught me that a dog can live to be 3 times older than is considered average if their diet consists of:
- raw meat [especially organ meat]
- fermented vegetables
- seaweed

Wonderful story about a Rhodesian Ridgeback that once was separated from it's owner for weeks, having to fend for itself in the wild; when reunited with his dog, it surprised the owner that his Ridgeback looked none the worse for wear...

About water, you make a valid point; i have one of these:
and keep it at the ready. Holds 1.5 liter.
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Socrates

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Re: Surviving on the move
« Reply #25 on: June 13, 2017, 07:37:37 AM »
Surviving on the Move may have some lists of a shorter variety...
Checked out Surviving on the move since i missed it looking for a place to put my post.
No posts on minimalist lists to mention.

I do love my jeleba:

It's a sleeping bag, coat, rain coat [rain just runs off the wool] and cover all rolled into one. There's a reason they are still in fashion in Morocco...

Also, a (small) crossbow would be nice:
- protection and deterrent
- hunting
It may not be a gun, but no one's gonna mess with you if you have a loaded crossbow at your side... 50 bucks'll get you one and as long as you carry it dismantled, few rules and regulations apply.
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Yowbarb

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #26 on: June 13, 2017, 01:45:19 PM »
:)

Socrates

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Re: stone age TEOTWAWKI short list
« Reply #27 on: June 14, 2017, 05:10:55 AM »
the copper/brass garden trowel...

One website selling these things quotes:
"If my house were burning down, i would go into it to save my brass trowel"...
Is that a legitimate quote? Who knows; but it sure sounds true and cool.

I have put myself out there and experienced first-hand that digging in the dirt is a real and daily thing. I once owned this one-piece aluminum garden trowel and i still miss it; no handle to come loose, no oxidation and tough as all hell.
I'm looking at ordering these brass/copper garden trowels, but i'm also still looking out for aluminum tools that should be as indifferent to time as any brass.
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MadMax

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #28 on: June 14, 2017, 07:32:08 AM »
HAM communications gear will be “essential” in the aftertime, I have posted extensively about this elsewhere on the forum (especially HF gear that can be battery operated with low current draw). The 80M HAM band will probably serve us best for “local” (200-300 kilometers range) with just a long wire for an antenna.

Don’t focus on all of the fancy HAM gear on the various websites, get something small portable with a low current draw. If you can handle a soldering iron (and if not get involved with your local HAM radio group and learn) so you can fix it yourself if something goes wrong. Something with 5-10 watts output is ideal.

I have built a couple of these, very good kit to get started on, it has ~50ma current draw on receive and could run for days on a 35AH Gel Cell battery. I have one “EMP Protected” in an empty paint can from the local hardware store they cost about $6.00 each:

KD1JV Survivor 75m SSB transceiver
http://qrpkits.com/survivor.html

I have written more about all of this other places on the forum..
Max.
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ilinda

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Re: stone age TEOTWAWKI short list
« Reply #29 on: June 14, 2017, 11:49:47 AM »
the copper/brass garden trowel...

One website selling these things quotes:
"If my house were burning down, i would go into it to save my brass trowel"...
Is that a legitimate quote? Who knows; but it sure sounds true and cool.

I have put myself out there and experienced first-hand that digging in the dirt is a real and daily thing. I once owned this one-piece aluminum garden trowel and i still miss it; no handle to come loose, no oxidation and tough as all hell.
I'm looking at ordering these brass/copper garden trowels, but i'm also still looking out for aluminum tools that should be as indifferent to time as any brass.
I've only had my copper/bronze trowels for a few years but now feel like they are part of me.  I recommend them to anyone who is serious about digging in the Earth, planting stuff, etc.  An added bonus is that their use in the soil leaves microscopic bits of copper in the soil, which repels slugs.