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Author Topic: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?  (Read 9108 times)

R.R. Book

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #30 on: June 14, 2017, 02:43:21 PM »
Those tools sound wonderful y'all - I'm still using an old kitchen spoon!  ::)

Yowbarb

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #31 on: June 14, 2017, 04:04:54 PM »
HAM communications gear will be “essential” in the aftertime, I have posted extensively about this elsewhere on the forum (especially HF gear that can be battery operated with low current draw). The 80M HAM band will probably serve us best for “local” (200-300 kilometers range) with just a long wire for an antenna.

Don’t focus on all of the fancy HAM gear on the various websites, get something small portable with a low current draw. If you can handle a soldering iron (and if not get involved with your local HAM radio group and learn) so you can fix it yourself if something goes wrong. Something with 5-10 watts output is ideal.

I have built a couple of these, very good kit to get started on, it has ~50ma current draw on receive and could run for days on a 35AH Gel Cell battery. I have one “EMP Protected” in an empty paint can from the local hardware store they cost about $6.00 each:

KD1JV Survivor 75m SSB transceiver
http://qrpkits.com/survivor.html

I have written more about all of this other places on the forum..
Max.

Excellent stuff, MadMax. I'm glad you have posted this in other places on the forum, too.
- Barb T.

Yowbarb

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #32 on: December 28, 2017, 12:15:12 PM »
One thing I would add is a stash of prescriptions meds.
Not always so easy to afford an extra stash, but they will likely be needed.
Online purchasing possible...

Also antibiotics.  Have a short  med profile for your family, friends, group or potential group. If a person does not have a penicillin allergy and you are all out in the survival land with no doc, and a red line is running up the leg (blood poisoning from an infected sore on foot) then you go on and give an antibiotic. You don't wait that long...

Blood poisoning can kill a person in a matter of ___ days, weeks (I couldn't find the exact amt of time.) Google search ____s lately.
I could not verify that penicillin is the most used antibiotic. I thought that was gneerally known info, but not finding verification of that. Not finding that info.

Yowbarb Note, continued - Not everyone is aware of blood poisoning or even know what it is.
Back in the 1960s in my college days:
One of my brother's friends, Bob had a slight, not-easy-to-see-himself, red line running from his foot up his leg about 1/3 of the way. I pointed it out to him and said, "that is blood poisoning! Go over to the college med center now and get it treated." Bob said, "OH! Thanks."  (Bob went to the nearby college, like i did.) Bob had no idea what that was or the symptoms, went there and got treated.

ilinda

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #33 on: December 28, 2017, 04:40:09 PM »
One thing I would add is a stash of prescriptions meds.
Not always so easy to afford an extra stash, but they will likely be needed.
Online purchasing possible...

Also antibiotics.  Have a short  med profile for your family, friends, group or potential group. If a person does not have a penicillin allergy and you are all out in the survival land with no doc, and a red line is running up the leg (blood poisoning from an infected sore on foot) then you go on and give an antibiotic. You don't wait that long...

Blood poisoning can kill a person in a matter of ___ days, weeks (I couldn't find the exact amt of time.) Google search ____s lately.
I could not verify that penicillin is the most used antibiotic. I thought that was gneerally known info, but not finding verification of that. Not finding that info.

Yowbarb Note, continued - Not everyone is aware of blood poisoning or even know what it is.
Back in the 1960s in my college days:
One of my brother's friends, Bob had a slight, not-easy-to-see-himself, red line running from his foot up his leg about 1/3 of the way. I pointed it out to him and said, "that is blood poisoning! Go over to the college med center now and get it treated." Bob said, "OH! Thanks."  (Bob went to the nearby college, like i did.) Bob had no idea what that was or the symptoms, went there and got treated.
You probably saved his life!

Yowbarb

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #34 on: December 28, 2017, 05:23:37 PM »
One thing I would add is a stash of prescriptions meds.
Not always so easy to afford an extra stash, but they will likely be needed.
Online purchasing possible...

Also antibiotics.  Have a short  med profile for your family, friends, group or potential group. If a person does not have a penicillin allergy and you are all out in the survival land with no doc, and a red line is running up the leg (blood poisoning from an infected sore on foot) then you go on and give an antibiotic. You don't wait that long...

Blood poisoning can kill a person in a matter of ___ days, weeks (I couldn't find the exact amt of time.) Google search ____s lately.
I could not verify that penicillin is the most used antibiotic. I thought that was gneerally known info, but not finding verification of that. Not finding that info.

Yowbarb Note, continued - Not everyone is aware of blood poisoning or even know what it is.
Back in the 1960s in my college days:
One of my brother's friends, Bob had a slight, not-easy-to-see-himself, red line running from his foot up his leg about 1/3 of the way. I pointed it out to him and said, "that is blood poisoning! Go over to the college med center now and get it treated." Bob said, "OH! Thanks."  (Bob went to the nearby college, like i did.) Bob had no idea what that was or the symptoms, went there and got treated.
You probably saved his life!

I think so...
Funny now when I google blood poisoning it doesn't mention the red line from the wound...
I had thought that was common knowledge back then... Why it's not easily found with a google search, not sure.
Like I mentioned, Bob had no idea of the infection or the blood poisoning... he didn't mention the treatment but he said he went to the student clinic and got it taken care of.

ilinda

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #35 on: December 29, 2017, 12:00:50 PM »
One thing I would add is a stash of prescriptions meds.
Not always so easy to afford an extra stash, but they will likely be needed.
Online purchasing possible...

Also antibiotics.  Have a short  med profile for your family, friends, group or potential group. If a person does not have a penicillin allergy and you are all out in the survival land with no doc, and a red line is running up the leg (blood poisoning from an infected sore on foot) then you go on and give an antibiotic. You don't wait that long...

Blood poisoning can kill a person in a matter of ___ days, weeks (I couldn't find the exact amt of time.) Google search ____s lately.
I could not verify that penicillin is the most used antibiotic. I thought that was gneerally known info, but not finding verification of that. Not finding that info.

Yowbarb Note, continued - Not everyone is aware of blood poisoning or even know what it is.
Back in the 1960s in my college days:
One of my brother's friends, Bob had a slight, not-easy-to-see-himself, red line running from his foot up his leg about 1/3 of the way. I pointed it out to him and said, "that is blood poisoning! Go over to the college med center now and get it treated." Bob said, "OH! Thanks."  (Bob went to the nearby college, like i did.) Bob had no idea what that was or the symptoms, went there and got treated.
You probably saved his life!

I think so...
Funny now when I google blood poisoning it doesn't mention the red line from the wound...
I had thought that was common knowledge back then... Why it's not easily found with a google search, not sure.
Like I mentioned, Bob had no idea of the infection or the blood poisoning... he didn't mention the treatment but he said he went to the student clinic and got it taken care of.
A few years ago when I had a flesh-eating bacterial infection on my arm, one of the things I noticed in the progression (the lesion changed daily, and seemingly by the hour) was a very thin reddish-purple line emanating from it.  Like you, I'm old enough to remember when they used to warn people about that red line "that might go toward the heart" and if it does, your infection becomes systemic.

Initially I had many different signs and symptoms, but the red line was the most scary, and since I didn't have the nausea and vomiting, knew it hadn't become systemic yet.

Yowbarb

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #36 on: December 29, 2017, 01:49:02 PM »
One thing I would add is a stash of prescriptions meds.
Not always so easy to afford an extra stash, but they will likely be needed.
Online purchasing possible...

Also antibiotics.  Have a short  med profile for your family, friends, group or potential group. If a person does not have a penicillin allergy and you are all out in the survival land with no doc, and a red line is running up the leg (blood poisoning from an infected sore on foot) then you go on and give an antibiotic. You don't wait that long...

Blood poisoning can kill a person in a matter of ___ days, weeks (I couldn't find the exact amt of time.) Google search ____s lately.
I could not verify that penicillin is the most used antibiotic. I thought that was gneerally known info, but not finding verification of that. Not finding that info.

Yowbarb Note, continued - Not everyone is aware of blood poisoning or even know what it is.
Back in the 1960s in my college days:
One of my brother's friends, Bob had a slight, not-easy-to-see-himself, red line running from his foot up his leg about 1/3 of the way. I pointed it out to him and said, "that is blood poisoning! Go over to the college med center now and get it treated." Bob said, "OH! Thanks."  (Bob went to the nearby college, like i did.) Bob had no idea what that was or the symptoms, went there and got treated.
You probably saved his life!

I think so...
Funny now when I google blood poisoning it doesn't mention the red line from the wound...
I had thought that was common knowledge back then... Why it's not easily found with a google search, not sure.
Like I mentioned, Bob had no idea of the infection or the blood poisoning... he didn't mention the treatment but he said he went to the student clinic and got it taken care of.
A few years ago when I had a flesh-eating bacterial infection on my arm, one of the things I noticed in the progression (the lesion changed daily, and seemingly by the hour) was a very thin reddish-purple line emanating from it.  Like you, I'm old enough to remember when they used to warn people about that red line "that might go toward the heart" and if it does, your infection becomes systemic.

Initially I had many different signs and symptoms, but the red line was the most scary, and since I didn't have the nausea and vomiting, knew it hadn't become systemic yet.

Wow ilinda! So you do remember that old warning. Yes, that is really scary.
I am so glad the infection was caught on time!!

R.R. Book

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #37 on: December 29, 2017, 02:43:32 PM »
Quote
A few years ago when I had a flesh-eating bacterial infection on my arm

Ilinda, Do you know how you might have acquired it? 

Yowbarb

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #38 on: December 30, 2017, 02:48:41 AM »
I knew this young couple, the wife was from an Indian Reservation.
She told me she got bit by a brown recluse and she wasn't sure that would ever heal...
I think someone must have donated their services as a plastic surgeon because she lost a small hunk of flesh on her leg... I think she was in and out of the hospital...
She also mentioned the Hanta Virus... that was back about 1993.

R.R. Book

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #39 on: December 30, 2017, 08:02:22 AM »
Hanta may be an issue in poorly ventillated buildings with animals leaving droppings, such as bats and mice.  Examples would be barns and abandoned houses.  We once considered buying an older home that had been vacant and closed up for a long time, and discovered that it was occupied by bats when we walked through it with a realtor.  Everyone in the family took colloidal silver as a precaution, and we never became ill.

https://www.cdc.gov/hantavirus/pdf/hps_brochure.pdf

ilinda

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #40 on: December 30, 2017, 06:20:26 PM »
Quote
A few years ago when I had a flesh-eating bacterial infection on my arm

Ilinda, Do you know how you might have acquired it?
I had gone to the beach with a bunch of friends and remembered having carried someone's bag across the river.  We waded to the "better" side and had to lug all our stuff across the knee-deep to waist-deep river.

The bag I carried was old and it rested on my left forearm for the trek across the water.  That spot where the bag rested is exactly where the lesion appeared, about a day later. 

The assumption is that the bag had been placed somewhere, or sat somewhere where it picked up the bacteria on the bottom of the bag.  The owner had a dog at the time and I wondered if the bag had been set down on the ground one or more times on locations where dog poo was.  It was here and there in the yard.  It's my best guess, as I tried to think about where a bad Strep. variety could originate.  Just a guess.

The very first and most memorable thing about the lesion's development was the intense pain, but never an iota of itching.

Yowbarb

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #41 on: December 30, 2017, 09:10:15 PM »
Quote
A few years ago when I had a flesh-eating bacterial infection on my arm

Ilinda, Do you know how you might have acquired it?
I had gone to the beach with a bunch of friends and remembered having carried someone's bag across the river.  We waded to the "better" side and had to lug all our stuff across the knee-deep to waist-deep river.

The bag I carried was old and it rested on my left forearm for the trek across the water.  That spot where the bag rested is exactly where the lesion appeared, about a day later. 

The assumption is that the bag had been placed somewhere, or sat somewhere where it picked up the bacteria on the bottom of the bag.  The owner had a dog at the time and I wondered if the bag had been set down on the ground one or more times on locations where dog poo was.  It was here and there in the yard.  It's my best guess, as I tried to think about where a bad Strep. variety could originate.  Just a guess.

The very first and most memorable thing about the lesion's development was the intense pain, but never an iota of itching.

I think you are probably right about the origin of that infection...

R.R. Book

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #42 on: December 31, 2017, 06:26:58 AM »
How scary that the infection could be passed that easily.  So glad you got good care right away!

ilinda

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Re: What would better a person's odds of surviving an emergency?
« Reply #43 on: December 31, 2017, 02:11:50 PM »
How scary that the infection could be passed that easily.  So glad you got good care right away!
I had posted about it somewhere here on the TH and the funny thing is Barb had asked about "before" and "after" pictures, but all I had was
"during" pictures!  So long after, I did post some "after" pics.

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