Author Topic: Raising Rabbits & The Kolbrin Bible  (Read 1142 times)

Ruth

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Raising Rabbits & The Kolbrin Bible
« on: May 28, 2015, 01:44:00 PM »
Though I am now 70, and sold our family homestead of 40 years only a year ago, many things stick with me. Early on my husband and I committed ourselves to a healthy organic, and eco friendly life style for our young family which would see 6 children.

 My parents were preppers in the 1970s when gold was $35 an ounce and people lined up at the gas pumps before the next price hike to $0.27/gal.  I lived and worked in Milwaukee during the racial discord of the 1960s, remember needing a police escort to enter my work place at the county mental health institutions, the National Guard camped out at the fairgrounds, and curfews. I'm also a USAF Vietnam era vet late 1960s, and my profession was in mental health, with returning soldiers.

Post World War II is still vivid in my mind as I recall the frugal times. Grandma and mom repurposing clothing into even coats for me and my siblings. There was no limit to ingenuity, thrift (even hoarding!), and barter. I am so grateful for that upbringing. I had 4 uncles in the war, my ex 1. For both of us there was a KIA. The gold star on each side of the family still aches when I see it. My 2 military sons are preparing for yet more deployments over seas. Several families I know have gold stars in their windows now too.

This is the background of my involvement here and especially on the SWAG board. The article posted in the pdf below is of our experience raising rabbits in the late 1970s in NE Wisconsin - Manitowoc, Newton area, 3 miles inland from Lake Michigan. The climate is always 5 to 10 degrees cooler than inland, often more humid as well. This info may be helpful to others in similar climates. Humidity and cold were the tough elements.

I've been reading in earnest the Yowbooks material. What moved me most was Being In It for the Species. I truly feel most of us will not make it through all of the tribulation, if we don't pay attention to Planet X the Kolbrin Bible Connection. Some aspects of the prophecies are not being taken seriously. It's a slim paperback and has all the references taken from the Kolbrin Bible that relate specifically to the Incoming. Every prepper should read it. These are words from the people living at the time, not religious mystics, real people. 

Thanks to all who post here.

Ruth

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Re: Raising Rabbits & The Kolbrin Bible
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2015, 08:30:56 PM »
Sorry everyone, that message was supposed to have an attachment. Here's the comments about rabbits.

Raising Rabbits for Survival Food, or Not

There are pros and cons for raising rabbits for survival food. These are my opinions based on having raised rabbits for food and sale for several years. Others with more experience may disagree. Visit rabbitries before deciding to start one.
New Zealand White – Great Production Breed
The breed we raised were purebred New Zealand White, with the red eyes. These are large rabbits, full-grown 8 to 10lbs. They are one of the most economical to raise considering time to market weight and for feed. Gorgeous, and curious they were fun to watch and interact with in spite of the occasional bite to our hands. The bites were defensive on their part when approached too quickly startling them.
We had one breeding buck. The does we had regularly produced 10 to 13 in a litter, with gestation of 32 days. We left the kits with the moms until they were done nursing and well onto solid food, 3 to 4 weeks. Then we separated the bucks from the does as they get too frisky harassing the young does, and even their mother. The breeding does were rebred 60 days after giving birth. We did not breed our does longer than 2 years.  By then young does from the first litter were mature.
 With proper nutrition and care the kits reached market weight at 8 weeks averaging 6lbs. Bucks were usually heavier, but once butchered the meat weighed between 3 and 4lbs per rabbit.
Rabbit Housing
We used stacked wire cages that had trays under each layer to catch droppings and urine. Even with daily tray clean up the ammonia odor was strong especially when the bunnies were well grown, and the barn had to be closed up. Good ventilation was a must no matter how cold it was outside – talking northeast Wisconsin here. In bitter cold, below zero, the rabbits had trouble keeping warm. We blocked off drafts from windows and put plastic around part of the cages, even used a space heater. This backfired as humidity rose, and the bunnies got runny noses. Winter care for bunnies was a real headache. If rabbits or other livestock are treated with antibiotics the meat is unfit for consumption. In a dire situation that of course is debatable.
Water was provided by bottles with a self feeding tube hung on the cages. Water is only released when the rabbit licks on the metal ball inside, dislodging it so water can get past it. These are commonly seen in pet stores. Supplying water in open bowls quickly makes a mess, with debris and droppings contaminating the water.
Disease
Even with attention to cleanliness, nutrition and comfort, rabbits can easily become sick. Two common problems are snuffles and coccidiosis requiring veterinary help and antibiotics. Usually a sick rabbit must be destroyed as cage life doesn’t help healing. We never lost any to sickness as they responded well to fresh herbs. We did put our bunnies on grass enclosures in summer which they enjoyed. These were wire pet enclosures that easily fold up for storage. But that needs to be moved every few days, and protected from hawks.  Rabbits can also pick up parasites this way especially if there are wild rabbits in the area. This website is helpful for rabbit illnesses. http://www.hobbyfarms.com/farm-pets/pet-rabbit-information/5-rabbit-illnesses-to-know.aspx
Rabbits perspire through the pads of their feet. The wire cages caused problems for feet, and though we tried putting straw down for bedding, they kicked it around and it just made cleanup more challenging. We put nest boxes in the corners so the does could get a sense of privacy and be off the wire. With a growing brood of kits however, the cages soon crowd. Feet must be checked at least weekly.
Rabbit Food
Rabbits will do well on a variety of root crops like carrots, turnips, rutabagas, sugar beets, along with a wide selection of greens like beet tops, clover, dandelion, plantain, maple and ash leaves. They need the dry roughage from straw for example, and are prone to digestive issues if they don’t get enough. We fed choice hay mixed timothy and alfalfa. Straight fresh alfalfa can cause diarrhea so it’s best served as hay. A small salt block can be attached to the cages. We supplemented with “Calf Manna” pellets, a concentrated animal feed given as a side feeding in amounts determined by the weight of the animal and life stage. “Calf manna” pellets have a wonderful anise (licorice) aroma which is why one day I caught two of my young children munching away at an open bag. It’s not harmful but they didn’t do it again, so far as I know.  We also fed rabbit pellets which are primarily concentrated and pressed alfalfa purchased at the farm supply stores. The issues with survival storage are keeping the pellets free of moisture and contamination. We emptied the new bags into 5 gallon clean buckets with covers and filled the bowls from that. Don’t store feed bags on the floor, even if it’s cement or tile. Condensation will accumulate, and no place is totally vermin free. Mealy worms (flour beetle) are happy to move in. But then they make good chicken feed or stir fry.
We put fresh twigs in often, like maple, ash, not evergreen, so they could chew as their teeth grow continually. Nail clipping is also essential as curved nails can get caught in the wire cages and rip out. I let my husband do the nail clipping. We also tattooed the breeding rabbits in their ears as we also showed them at the county fair and it helped to identify them. New Zealand Whites all look alike, about all that differentiates them are little personality quirks.
Rabbits eat their droppings which look like small brown marbles. That’s because they don’t completely digest their food the first time through. Even with wire cages they seem to have enough droppings that don’t fall through, to meet their needs. And I’ve observed them catching the fresh pellet as it is passed right into their mouth.
Slaughter
There is no nice way to kill a rabbit. Yes, they may shriek with an awful sound. But not always. My husband would gently pick up the live bunny by the scruff (loose skin at back of the neck) and hold it securely, petting it to calm it.  He used a small sledge hammer with a quick blow to the head.
Skinning a rabbit is like pulling a sock off if done properly. Hang the carcass by the hind paws. Slit the neck to allow it to bleed out. Then make a complete cut around the hind legs at the lowest joint – the paw, and the front legs at the paw joint. Then make a cut joining the two cuts at the hind end, circling the anus and genitals. Then loosen the hide enough all around the cut edges to get a good grip on front and back. Carefully pull the hide down over the body toward the head, as if taking off a sock, cutting it loose at the neck.
Rabbit Skin - Pelt – Hide
The fur is gorgeous but unless there is a market for the salted dried hides they have to be discarded. Once I learned how to scrape them, it was too labor intensive to continue, with all the other things to do on a homestead. So the hides were buried. In a survival situation the hides would be valuable for children’s clothing and undergarments as a nicely tanned hide is very soft and light.
Cut the fresh hide open at the belly, lay flat on clean cardboard and cover entire surface and edges with an inch of salt. Store in a dry well ventilated place like a loft area. The surface it is on needs to help dry it out, the cardboard will wick it away. If screening is available or burlap that will work but will also tempt insects.
Bulk salt can be purchased at farm supply stores or co-ops as can the cages, equipment and Calf Manna. In Wisconsin that’s Fleet Farm. The salt will absorb moisture from the air if it is humid, and the hides may rot anyway. Keep an eye on them. Mice and rats like to nibble on exposed edges. Preserving hides uses a lot of salt, and it shouldn’t be reused, except maybe on icy roads. One has to weigh the cost to survival supplies.
This website shows how a wild rabbit is skinned, butchered and prepared as food. The pelt of the wild rabbit is much more fragile than that of the NZW. We raised a litter of orphaned wild rabbits, eventually butchering them for food. The exception was one that had been our first family pet. “Bump” lived to be 11 years old, actually had gray hair in his wild rabbit coat, and died peacefully one night.
The other wild ones we raised were in separate wire cages as they fought otherwise. They looked and acted healthy but once they grew to full size did not weigh more than a few lbs. It was almost a year before we butchered them. They got the same feed as the NZW. I had some of their hides professionally tanned but they did not turn out nice, full of tears and holes.
http://www.wikihow.com/Eat-Wild-Rabbit
http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-tan-a-rabbit-pelt/
How to Eat Rabbit Meat and Live
Rabbits are attractive as a food source because, when healthy and well cared for they are prolific. But rabbit meat is also very lean. It must be prepared with a good fat like coconut or olive oil, otherwise the meat requires more energy to digest than you will get out of it in return. If rabbit is the exclusive food with no other significant food, a condition called “rabbit starvation” can happen. No matter how much of it you eat you won’t feel satisfied nor well. For survival food then don’t consume rabbit meat every day.
Rabbit Stew
If I had to rely on rabbit meat for survival my choice dish would be stew with lots of starchy vegetables and plenty of coconut oil, beef or poultry fat. Starchy vegetables will give the full feeling, and be comfort food. Cut the meat off the bone into cubes,  sautee the rabbit meat in the fat, put the meat and bones in the pot as well. Add vegetables, cover with water, add a tablespoon of vinegar to draw the minerals out of the bones into the broth. Add a generous handful of dried wild greens and the stew will be rich in minerals. Bring to boil, cover, reduce to simmer until the meat is tender.
http://thewannabehomesteader.com/why-rabbit-meat-is-not-the-best-survival-food/
Proponents of raising rabbits will point out the greater productivity of rabbits per food eaten over beef or goats. That may be, but I worried over them more. They require more intense care, much more time for slaughter and meat processing, and are more susceptible to illness. The cage environment, to me is not humane. For all the cons we encountered we decided to sell our breeding stock and equipment. We then raised only dairy goats and chickens.  For more about these topics check out these websites.
http://www.crossroadsrabbitry.com/about-new-zealand-white-rabbits/
http://www.wikihow.com/Eat-Wild-Rabbit


ilinda

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Re: Raising Rabbits & The Kolbrin Bible
« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2015, 08:41:32 PM »
Though I am now 70, and sold our family homestead of 40 years only a year ago, many things stick with me. Early on my husband and I committed ourselves to a healthy organic, and eco friendly life style for our young family which would see 6 children.

 My parents were preppers in the 1970s when gold was $35 an ounce and people lined up at the gas pumps before the next price hike to $0.27/gal.  I lived and worked in Milwaukee during the racial discord of the 1960s, remember needing a police escort to enter my work place at the county mental health institutions, the National Guard camped out at the fairgrounds, and curfews. I'm also a USAF Vietnam era vet late 1960s, and my profession was in mental health, with returning soldiers.

Post World War II is still vivid in my mind as I recall the frugal times. Grandma and mom repurposing clothing into even coats for me and my siblings. There was no limit to ingenuity, thrift (even hoarding!), and barter. I am so grateful for that upbringing. I had 4 uncles in the war, my ex 1. For both of us there was a KIA. The gold star on each side of the family still aches when I see it. My 2 military sons are preparing for yet more deployments over seas. Several families I know have gold stars in their windows now too.

This is the background of my involvement here and especially on the SWAG board. The article posted in the pdf below is of our experience raising rabbits in the late 1970s in NE Wisconsin - Manitowoc, Newton area, 3 miles inland from Lake Michigan. The climate is always 5 to 10 degrees cooler than inland, often more humid as well. This info may be helpful to others in similar climates. Humidity and cold were the tough elements.

I've been reading in earnest the Yowbooks material. What moved me most was Being In It for the Species. I truly feel most of us will not make it through all of the tribulation, if we don't pay attention to Planet X the Kolbrin Bible Connection. Some aspects of the prophecies are not being taken seriously. It's a slim paperback and has all the references taken from the Kolbrin Bible that relate specifically to the Incoming. Every prepper should read it. These are words from the people living at the time, not religious mystics, real people. 

Thanks to all who post here.
Welcome to the TH, Ruth, and thanks for your intro. and bio.  We are glad to have you and hope to learn from your knowledge.

I agree that not paying attention to PX and what it entails will get a lot of us in trouble.  Just seeing those video captures by thundrn in the past few days makes one realize that the PX System is a real game changer.

Yowbarb

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Re: Raising Rabbits & The Kolbrin Bible
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2016, 02:03:22 PM »
Belated Thanks for Ruth for this Topic.
Ruth continues to send me items to post and we are in touch.
Ruth it was good seeing you on here posting the other day.
Thanks for all your work here,
Barb T.