Author Topic: what is 'survival food' / what to think of  (Read 7862 times)

ilinda

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #90 on: July 10, 2017, 03:24:56 PM »
Amazing, isn't it?

R.R. Book

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Good sized cabbages are now selling for 50 cents each at local farm markets.  As temps gradually begin dropping again, they may be good candidates for fresh eating for weeks and months to come.

According to Nancy Bubel's classic work Root Cellaring: Natural Cold Storage of Fruits and Vegatables, there are several different ways to store cabbage without electrical refrigeration, other than canning, if the storage area is at 40 degrees F or lower with a high humidity.  Start by pulling off any loose green outer leaves until you end up with just the tight heads.  Besides keeping them in a basement or root cellar, cabbage can also be stored in barrels and trenches, as long as they're not nicked or damaged.

Cabbage heads may be spaced apart on shelves, suspended from string, buried in hay, or wrapped in paper, as well as buried in a box of dirt.  If keeping them outdoors under some protection, they can be allowed to freeze when temperatures drop, but must be cooked as soon as thawed.   

Other long-storage vegetables that we can put away without electrical refrigeration for this winter are pumpkins and winter squash, which prefer to be kept near room temperature in a location such as the pantry.  They can easily last unscathed through an entire winter, with the only noticeable change months later being less sugar content.  They are self-contained seed packages, as well, that should leave you with viable seed for the next growing season.
« Last Edit: July 14, 2017, 06:24:25 AM by R.R. Book »

Yowbarb

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #92 on: July 14, 2017, 10:08:59 AM »
R.R. Book - awesome info you are posting! I love the pics, too.
:)

Socrates

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Re: cabbage
« Reply #93 on: July 14, 2017, 10:41:56 PM »
Good sized cabbages are now selling for 50 cents each at local farm markets.  As temps gradually begin dropping again, they may be good candidates for fresh eating for weeks and months to come.
My father was a teenager during the 1944-45 winter in the Netherlands [i.e. last months of WW II]. In Holland this winter is known as 'the hunger winter'...
He used to tell about how they would munch on sauerkraut during the winter from a big barrel of it they had in the house, i.e. a prime example of survival conditions and what food made a difference.
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R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #94 on: July 15, 2017, 02:05:14 PM »
I didn't know that sauerkraut was kept in barrels!  Thanks for this story about your father and the winter of hunger - can you remember more descriptions from him of that winter?

Is sauerkraut one of the fermented foods that are naturally rich in probiotics?

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Re: sauerkraut
« Reply #95 on: July 15, 2017, 03:25:16 PM »
Sauerkraut's a fine source of probiotics and methyl groups [fight cancer and hormone imbalances].
People used to do loads of stuff in barrels. When these became popular [i.e centuries ago] it made a world of difference for trade, transportation and storage. One of the books in my library is by a cooper explaining how it's done; i consider it basic knowledge.

My dad's oldest sister who was 20 years his senior and lived through WW II as an adult, could go on and on about the war. My dad's stories were more from a teenager's perspective. A few things, though [i may have mentioned before in other posts]:
- they would stay in bed in the morning as long as possible to conserve energy (since there wasn't much to eat)
- my mother's family did pretty well since her father worked in the dunes and regularly came home with rabbit
- they ate tulip bulbs
- they tried eating the skin of potatoes too, but it was terrible
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R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #96 on: July 15, 2017, 04:20:21 PM »
What I wouldn't give to be a fly on the wall of your personal library!  It must be massive.

The tulip bulbs remind me that daylily bulbs are supposed to be edible, too.

I can see how sleeping in would make fasting easier - in fact, that might help all of us extend our supplies when the time comes.

I never could stand potato skins either, until I learned to roast sliced fingerlings in a little olive oil and sea salt!

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #97 on: July 20, 2017, 11:45:13 AM »
In the "Aftertime" one of these would feed the whole "tribe" for a month!!  ;D

Alabama hunter shoots down 820-pound wild hog in front yard

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/07/20/alabama-hunter-shoots-down-820-pound-wild-hog-in-front-yard.html

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R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #98 on: July 20, 2017, 02:23:55 PM »
Quote
Wade Seago, a deer hunter and taxidermist in Samson...

Talk about the boar being in the wrong place at the wrong time... :)

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Re: my survival library
« Reply #99 on: July 20, 2017, 07:28:03 PM »
One of the books in my library is by a cooper explaining how it's done; i consider it basic knowledge.
What I wouldn't give to be a fly on the wall of your personal library!  It must be massive.
It's not, actually; it was kinda my point: coopering is so basic that if you just have a few skills / instructions / tutorials to choose from, it should be among them.

Elaborating on what i feel is a big issue, i see it like this: people might at some point get the idea i've read a lot, but i haven't. There are 2 principles involved here;
- a good author can be recognized by his writing in every single paragraph; he sticks to the point, doesn't leave statements hanging, no assumptions, no cultural bs, etc. etc., but a bad author tends to make mistakes in just about every single paragraph. So one can quite quickly judge the quality of a book and save oneself the time of having to read lots. That have saved me a whole lotta time...
- also, though there are a number of basics to cover if you're interested in establishing a civilisation after TEOTWAWKI, i walk through book stores and public libraries and often find zero books worth reading. There's just so much one can (and should) ignore (if one's not to become distracted or pressed for time).

So i have a book on knitting, one on cement, etc. and some books that cover all the basics simultaneously, like...

... which covers everything from how to acquire basic elements to daguerreotypes [photography].
What i do not have are any of the endless books on matters that won't help at all in a post-TEOTWAWKI world. Don't forget: books are relatively darn heavy things; the less one has the better. There's just a basic collection to have, but i have made shortlists one might have, like if all one can carry is a single bag of books or something [or even just 3 or 5]. Even a few well-chosen books could make a world of difference.
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R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #100 on: July 21, 2017, 06:15:10 AM »
I followed Socrates' link and found this:

Quote
I have a carefully selected library that's the result of a lifetime of curiosity. It's about 5 meters in length, plus an Encyclopaedia Brittanica. Of all of these books, i have chosen the following 8 books as the ones i would never leave behind.

Quote
1: The 12th Planet by Zecharia Sitchin
2: The Land of No Horizon by Kevin & Matthew Taylor
3: For Your Own Good by Alice Miller
4: Periodic Tales by Hugh Aldersey-Williams
5: The Knee of Listening by Adi Da Samraj
6: Sacred and Herbal Healing Beers by Stephen Buhner
7: The Secret Teachings of Plants by Stephen Buhner
8: Wild Fermentation by Sandor Katz

Socrates, Re Periodic Tales: One of our home-schooling projects that my sons most enjoyed was taking a single element from the Periodic Table each day and deeply researching its structure and functions.  I think that high school and college chemistry in my own school days missed the boat by quickly confusing us with things like molarity vs. molality, rather than leading us into a basic exploration of the Periodic Table.  Too much rush to make useless entertaining scented mixtures and not enough foundation.

Examples of what my children and I discovered at home:
*There are elements in existence on earth that almost nothing is known about, such as Francium, which can only survive for 22 minutes.  No weighable quantity has ever been isolated.
*The heavier elements are progressively more reactive
*The importance of sodium as a biological battery has been known since pre-historic times
*Rubidium paradoxically is slightly radioactive yet anti-cancer, and assists with assimilating food.
*Rubidium is one of the most electro-positive elements, as well as one of the most alkaline.
*The reason radioactive Cesium is so dangerous is that it mimics potassium and is readily taken in by cells.  Yet some experimenters also regard unenriched Cesium as being anti-cancer.
*Beryllium is essential to the manufacture of planes and rockets, due to its 2,000 degree melting point.
*Beryllium is found in fresh stream water, rather than in ocean water.
*Besides Iron, cobalt and nickel also produce their own magnetic fields
*Vanadium, found in black pepper, makes people calm
*Absolutely pure Vanadium is almost non-existent in nature, due to reacting strongly to the presence of Oxygen
*Magnesium can replace the many biological functions of manganese
*Iron is only non-toxic when bound to protein
*Cobalt comes from a German word meaning "evil spirit."
*Silver is so anti-microbial that our ancestors would drop coins in milk to keep it fresh
*Japanese physicians use the negative charge of gold to counteract illness caused by toxic positive ions
*Scanadium is common on the sun and stars, but rare here.
*Titanium does not react to acids and strong alkalis.
*Yttrium is necessary for colored television, yet catches fire when it touches air.
*Zirconium is not radioactive but is necessary to produce nuclear power plants.
*Many elements only exist in nature bound to another element.
*Technetium only exists naturally in outer space, but can be synthesized here and used for medical tests
*Johnson-Matthey has been experimenting with anti-cancer properties of the entire platinum group of metals.  One of these, Ruthenium, is explosive in the presence of potassium salts.
*Certain metals in the platinum group gain new properties when processed until they lose their metallic coloring and turn red
*Palladium can absorb 900 times its own weight in Hydrogen
*When alloyed with Gold, Palladium creates a "magical" metal called "white gold."
*Palladium is commonly used as a chemical catalyst
*Tantalum is very heavy and hard, yet can be bent into any shape and almost nothing exists that can damage it chemically.
*Elements can have very different names in other languages, such as Tungsten being called "Wolframite" in German.
*Tungsten has the highest melting point of all metals and the greatest strength
*Rhenium is necessary for making mass-spectrographs
*Osmium is the densest non-radioactive element
*Iridium is of ET origin, yet 5% of the human brain is composed of it
*Iridium is the most corrosion-resistant metal known
*High levels of Iridium in certain geological formations are evidence of a meteor strike from a previous earth age
*Moses obtained Iridium directly from God on Mount El Shaddai, and in turn passed it to the Old Testament kings.
*Iridium levitates upon being processed in a lab.
*Archeological discoveries in the Middle East and Turkey prove that ancient man knew about the Platinum Group of metals, both how to extract them and how to use them, yet modern man has only known about them since 1735.
*Rutherfordium begins the radioactive metals row of the Periodic Table.  It is manmade, and there is no known use for it.  Its structure and color are both unknown.  Same for Dubnium, Seaborgium, Bohrium, Hassium, and Meitnerium.
*Aluminum only comes from the mineral bauxite.
*Gallium is an important semiconductor because it conducts electricity but not hot juice, and is a liquid at room temperature (like Cesium, Rubidium and Mercury). It will melt in a person's hand.
*Indium differs from the other elements because it has a tetrahedral or pyramid shape.  It makes a screaming sound when bent.
*Thallium is necessary to detect infrared radiation
*Lead comes from a mineral called galena.
*Bismuth 209 has a half-life of one billion times the age of the universe
*Magnesium is vital to all plant life, because it's part of chlorophyll.
*The longest-lived isotope of Radium has a half-life of 1,601 years, while the next-longest-lived Radium isotope only survives 5.75 years.
*Lithium is the lightest-weight metal on earth, followed by Potassium.
*Boron is never found alone in nature, but always joined with other elements.  Its melting point is more than 2000 degrees, so it's used to make heat-resistant glass.
*Boron neutralizes radiation.
*Turkey supplies most of the world's Boron.
*Boron is as important to bone and teeth strength as calcium, in lesser quantities.
*Silicon is rarely found in pure form, and is only toxic if inhaled.
*Germanium is one of the few substances that solidifies in its molten state.
*Arsenic comes from a mineral called "mispickel."
*Antimony gets its name from Greek words meaning "against being alone."  It comes from the minerals stibnite and valentinite.
*One of Tellurium's isotopes has a half-life that is 160 trillion times the age of the universe.
*Polonium has no known use.  Marie Curie named it after her country to highlight its oppression and bring it to the world's attention.
*The Halogen family of the Periodic Table is the only family contains all 3 phases: solids, liquids and gasses. 
*Halogens are highly reactive with alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, until they join together to become stable salts.  The halogens have a strong negative charge, while the alkali and alkaline earth metals have a strongly positive charge. The word "halogen" means "salt-maker." 
*"Astatine" gets its name from the Greek word for "unstable."  There is no known use for it, and it is so rare that it is measured in atoms.
*Bromine gets its name from a Greek word that means "stinky." 
*Chlorine was so deadly a weapon in WWI because gas masks were not yet invented.
*The Noble Gasses get their family name because they do not mix with other elements.
*Argon gets its name from a Greek word meaning "inactive," because it is not attracted to other elements.
*Krypton paradoxically means "hidden" in Greek, yet stands out boldly on a mass spectrometer with its bright green and orange lines.
*Hydrogen  makes up 90% of the universe.
*Carbon is paradoxically part of one of the lightest materials, graphite, and one of the hardest materials, diamond.
*Certain plants are capable of grabbing Nitrogen from the air and placing it in the soil
*Ozone (O3) is formed when electricity or ultraviolet light pass through water.
*Phosphorus can exist in nature as either red, yellow, black or white.  Its Greek name means "carrier of light," and it exists within all living things.
*Selenium is gray as a mineral and red as a powder.  Its name comes from the Greek word for "moon."
*Of the Rare Earth Elements, the Lanthanides occur in nature, while the Actinides are man-made.  All of the Actinides can cause cancer.
*Lanthanum's name comes from a Greek word meaning "hidden."  It is used to make expensive camera lenses.
*Neodymium forms the strongest known permanent magnets, but not at low temperatures.  Hybrid cars depend upon them, as do some free-energy devices.
*Gadolinium forms magnets with the opposite property: it is only strongly magnetic below 17 degrees C.
*Samarium magnets are less strong, but more stable.
*One element can break down to become another one. :)





« Last Edit: July 21, 2017, 09:09:56 AM by R.R. Book »

R.R. Book

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #101 on: July 21, 2017, 06:19:38 AM »
Other interesting books recommended on Socrates' website (though we're getting off of the survival food topic):

Socrates

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Re: what is 'survival food' books
« Reply #102 on: July 21, 2017, 09:19:31 AM »
To get back to the topic of survival foods...
Charcuterie by Michael Ruhlman is a book some health experts recommended in some podcast i was listening to a few years ago [OneRadioNetwork]; it's pretty impressive-looking and i'm now convinced getting and preparing meat must be one of the most powerful ways of acquiring nutrients and calories. I mean, just think of what the above-pictured wild boar was collecting and eating, all day, every day, for years on end; that meat represents a kind of self-sustaining biological factory that grows all on it's own. When ya get to thinking about it, having animals do all the work, i.e. including digesting and saving food (in their bodies), just makes perfect sense. I mean, talking survival...
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ilinda

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #103 on: July 22, 2017, 04:33:30 PM »
I followed Socrates' link and found this:

Quote
I have a carefully selected library that's the result of a lifetime of curiosity. It's about 5 meters in length, plus an Encyclopaedia Brittanica. Of all of these books, i have chosen the following 8 books as the ones i would never leave behind.

Quote
1: The 12th Planet by Zecharia Sitchin
2: The Land of No Horizon by Kevin & Matthew Taylor
3: For Your Own Good by Alice Miller
4: Periodic Tales by Hugh Aldersey-Williams
5: The Knee of Listening by Adi Da Samraj
6: Sacred and Herbal Healing Beers by Stephen Buhner
7: The Secret Teachings of Plants by Stephen Buhner
8: Wild Fermentation by Sandor Katz

Interesting that four of those eight are on my "keeper" list as well.  I have #'s 1,6,7, and 8, and yes they are valuable books.  Need to investigate the others.

Was just perusing Wild Fermentation again this morning and noticed the recipe for ricotta cheese --was surprised to see it is made from whey.  I've seen other ricotta recipes and don't remember that, but this ricotta recipe looks so EASY.

ilinda

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Re: what is 'survival food' / what to think of
« Reply #104 on: July 22, 2017, 04:38:17 PM »
I followed Socrates' link and found this:

Socrates, Re Periodic Tales: One of our home-schooling projects that my sons most enjoyed was taking a single element from the Periodic Table each day and deeply researching its structure and functions.  I think that high school and college chemistry in my own school days missed the boat by quickly confusing us with things like molarity vs. molality, rather than leading us into a basic exploration of the Periodic Table.  Too much rush to make useless entertaining scented mixtures and not enough foundation.

Examples of what my children and I discovered at home:
*There are elements in existence on earth that almost nothing is known about, such as Francium, which can only survive for 22 minutes.  No weighable quantity has ever been isolated.
*The heavier elements are progressively more reactive
*The importance of sodium as a biological battery has been known since pre-historic times
*Rubidium paradoxically is slightly radioactive yet anti-cancer, and assists with assimilating food.
*Rubidium is one of the most electro-positive elements, as well as one of the most alkaline.
*The reason radioactive Cesium is so dangerous is that it mimics potassium and is readily taken in by cells.  Yet some experimenters also regard unenriched Cesium as being anti-cancer.
*Beryllium is essential to the manufacture of planes and rockets, due to its 2,000 degree melting point.
*Beryllium is found in fresh stream water, rather than in ocean water.
*Besides Iron, cobalt and nickel also produce their own magnetic fields
*Vanadium, found in black pepper, makes people calm
*Absolutely pure Vanadium is almost non-existent in nature, due to reacting strongly to the presence of Oxygen
*Magnesium can replace the many biological functions of manganese
*Iron is only non-toxic when bound to protein
*Cobalt comes from a German word meaning "evil spirit."
*Silver is so anti-microbial that our ancestors would drop coins in milk to keep it fresh
*Japanese physicians use the negative charge of gold to counteract illness caused by toxic positive ions
*Scanadium is common on the sun and stars, but rare here.
*Titanium does not react to acids and strong alkalis.
*Yttrium is necessary for colored television, yet catches fire when it touches air.
*Zirconium is not radioactive but is necessary to produce nuclear power plants.
*Many elements only exist in nature bound to another element.
*Technetium only exists naturally in outer space, but can be synthesized here and used for medical tests
*Johnson-Matthey has been experimenting with anti-cancer properties of the entire platinum group of metals.  One of these, Ruthenium, is explosive in the presence of potassium salts.
*Certain metals in the platinum group gain new properties when processed until they lose their metallic coloring and turn red
*Palladium can absorb 900 times its own weight in Hydrogen
*When alloyed with Gold, Palladium creates a "magical" metal called "white gold."
*Palladium is commonly used as a chemical catalyst
*Tantalum is very heavy and hard, yet can be bent into any shape and almost nothing exists that can damage it chemically.
*Elements can have very different names in other languages, such as Tungsten being called "Wolframite" in German.
*Tungsten has the highest melting point of all metals and the greatest strength
*Rhenium is necessary for making mass-spectrographs
*Osmium is the densest non-radioactive element
*Iridium is of ET origin, yet 5% of the human brain is composed of it
*Iridium is the most corrosion-resistant metal known
*High levels of Iridium in certain geological formations are evidence of a meteor strike from a previous earth age
*Moses obtained Iridium directly from God on Mount El Shaddai, and in turn passed it to the Old Testament kings.
*Iridium levitates upon being processed in a lab.
*Archeological discoveries in the Middle East and Turkey prove that ancient man knew about the Platinum Group of metals, both how to extract them and how to use them, yet modern man has only known about them since 1735.
*Rutherfordium begins the radioactive metals row of the Periodic Table.  It is manmade, and there is no known use for it.  Its structure and color are both unknown.  Same for Dubnium, Seaborgium, Bohrium, Hassium, and Meitnerium.
*Aluminum only comes from the mineral bauxite.
*Gallium is an important semiconductor because it conducts electricity but not hot juice, and is a liquid at room temperature (like Cesium, Rubidium and Mercury). It will melt in a person's hand.
*Indium differs from the other elements because it has a tetrahedral or pyramid shape.  It makes a screaming sound when bent.
*Thallium is necessary to detect infrared radiation
*Lead comes from a mineral called galena.
*Bismuth 209 has a half-life of one billion times the age of the universe
*Magnesium is vital to all plant life, because it's part of chlorophyll.
*The longest-lived isotope of Radium has a half-life of 1,601 years, while the next-longest-lived Radium isotope only survives 5.75 years.
*Lithium is the lightest-weight metal on earth, followed by Potassium.
*Boron is never found alone in nature, but always joined with other elements.  Its melting point is more than 2000 degrees, so it's used to make heat-resistant glass.
*Boron neutralizes radiation.
*Turkey supplies most of the world's Boron.
*Boron is as important to bone and teeth strength as calcium, in lesser quantities.
*Silicon is rarely found in pure form, and is only toxic if inhaled.
*Germanium is one of the few substances that solidifies in its molten state.
*Arsenic comes from a mineral called "mispickel."
*Antimony gets its name from Greek words meaning "against being alone."  It comes from the minerals stibnite and valentinite.
*One of Tellurium's isotopes has a half-life that is 160 trillion times the age of the universe.
*Polonium has no known use.  Marie Curie named it after her country to highlight its oppression and bring it to the world's attention.
*The Halogen family of the Periodic Table is the only family contains all 3 phases: solids, liquids and gasses. 
*Halogens are highly reactive with alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, until they join together to become stable salts.  The halogens have a strong negative charge, while the alkali and alkaline earth metals have a strongly positive charge. The word "halogen" means "salt-maker." 
*"Astatine" gets its name from the Greek word for "unstable."  There is no known use for it, and it is so rare that it is measured in atoms.
*Bromine gets its name from a Greek word that means "stinky." 
*Chlorine was so deadly a weapon in WWI because gas masks were not yet invented.
*The Noble Gasses get their family name because they do not mix with other elements.
*Argon gets its name from a Greek word meaning "inactive," because it is not attracted to other elements.
*Krypton paradoxically means "hidden" in Greek, yet stands out boldly on a mass spectrometer with its bright green and orange lines.
*Hydrogen  makes up 90% of the universe.
*Carbon is paradoxically part of one of the lightest materials, graphite, and one of the hardest materials, diamond.
*Certain plants are capable of grabbing Nitrogen from the air and placing it in the soil
*Ozone (O3) is formed when electricity or ultraviolet light pass through water.
*Phosphorus can exist in nature as either red, yellow, black or white.  Its Greek name means "carrier of light," and it exists within all living things.
*Selenium is gray as a mineral and red as a powder.  Its name comes from the Greek word for "moon."
*Of the Rare Earth Elements, the Lanthanides occur in nature, while the Actinides are man-made.  All of the Actinides can cause cancer.
*Lanthanum's name comes from a Greek word meaning "hidden."  It is used to make expensive camera lenses.
*Neodymium forms the strongest known permanent magnets, but not at low temperatures.  Hybrid cars depend upon them, as do some free-energy devices.
*Gadolinium forms magnets with the opposite property: it is only strongly magnetic below 17 degrees C.
*Samarium magnets are less strong, but more stable.
*One element can break down to become another one. :)
Haven't opened my Minerals for the Genetic Code in a while, but wonder if a lot of the above valuable info. from Peiodic Tales is also in the Minerals... book.  When I first ordered it, I was overwhelmed by the sheer amount of new information container therein.