Author Topic: Seeds to bring  (Read 7492 times)

enlightenme

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #15 on: March 12, 2014, 07:13:20 PM »
Well, as you all probably know, I'm not real computer savy, so this information may be here in some form and I just didn't see it.  I was trying to decide what type of seeds I would pick up to throw in with my gotta have takealong stuff, just to have atleast some sort of a start if all else fails. And what would be the simplest, easy to grow in most climates.  I can remember those first few years on the farm putting in huge truck patch gardens with no experience or knowledge whatsoever, was challenging  and well to say the least it took a few years to kindof figure it out (and that was with all the resources of the current world available). I wouldn't say I actually became an expert, but anyway I decided to make a list of some of the easiest to grow that I'm going to pick up while the stock is probably still available this year (ofcourse making sure it's the good old-fashioned kind not that new Monsanto, or whatever that junk is) I'm going to make sure to get several kinds of Squash, Zucchini, beans (preferably bush not pole), tomatoes, and peppers. Also, onions (though those are really hard to grow from seeds instead of sets), beets and carrots (root vegies can be really challenging in my experience anyway unless the soil is just perfect), lettuce and spinach for fast grow, cucumbers  (great for pickling for later), corn (though you gotta put in a pretty big area, atleast double rowed if I remember correctly), peas and broccoli.  I think that's going to be my total short list.  Any other gardeners out there with additional suggestions/comments?? It's been awhile, I'm sure I've probably missed some pretty obvious ones that would make really great candidates for the gotta bring category.....
Hi Enlightenme,
I think probably the best way to go looking for seeds that aren't GMO Monsanto and all that, is when you do a search, Search "Heirloom vegetables", these are the old varieties and usually have a lot more flavour. Once you get some of these growing, then you can save the seeds yourself and stockpile them. I've got a pile of them myself, some I have sourced from growers on Ebay, and they don't cost an arm and a leg  :)
How are things going over in the states. I have heard things about some people not being allowed to grow their own veges etc... is this true?

First, so sorry for this belated reply to your post!  Thankfully I can report that I have heard of no such thing.  That would just be terrible!  There better not be anything like that, I'm sure there would be a major revolt!!  ;) ;D  The state that I live in, Pennsylvania is a very large farming area too, so I know the farmers around here would never put up with that nonsense!
Mary

steedy

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #16 on: April 14, 2014, 09:52:34 AM »
It only makes sense to have seeds of things you like to eat, and are able to grow in your area.  Also, it's a good idea to learn how to collect and save your own seeds too, not just because it's cheaper than having to buy new seeds every year, but also to save the seeds from the best producing plants.  That's how farmers have been doing it for years before the big hybrid companies, like Monsanto for instance, have told them to stop saving seeds.

There is a very easy method for saving tomato seeds and that is to cut your tomato in half and rub it onto a paper towel.  Let it dry and you can plant those seeds next year.

Other seeds, like pepper or beans, are very easy to save.  Let them dry before you store them in an airtight container.  I've used canning jars and even baggies for this.

Jimfarmer

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #17 on: April 14, 2014, 02:52:12 PM »
Quote
are able to grow in your area

Both before and after the pole shift.  Many regions will have a different climate afterwards.

enlightenme

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #18 on: April 14, 2014, 02:59:23 PM »
Quote
are able to grow in your area

Both before and after the pole shift.  Many regions will have a different climate afterwards.

Excellent point Jim!

steedy

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #19 on: April 14, 2014, 04:03:23 PM »
When do you expect the pole shift?

Jimfarmer

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #20 on: April 14, 2014, 08:33:35 PM »
When do you expect the pole shift?

My own personal wild guess is December of 2015.
My confidence in that prediction is low.

Now that so many predictions have been made over a period of many years, including even by Edgar Cayce, all of which have proven to be wrong, no source that I know of is making any more statements about timing other than to say "soon".  One popular reply to that is "Deja Poo - we have heard that crap before".

steedy

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #21 on: April 15, 2014, 04:04:28 PM »
I'm not concerned at all about a pole shift, mostly because ifwe get one, it won't be in my lifetime.  I'm more concerned about overall economic collapse.  Even if it's just your own personal collapse, or regional, but I think it'll be more global actually.

Yowbarb

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #22 on: April 15, 2014, 04:13:22 PM »
When do you expect the pole shift?

See theory at Marshall's new Topic:
http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?topic=5508.msg79547#msg79547

Cut to the Chase - cttcRadio.com / Planet X Flyby Distance to Earth and Pole Shift — Carles Esquerda

« on: April 13, 2014, 08:49:40 PM »

Planet X Flyby Distance to Earth and Pole Shift — Carles Esquerda, Alcione Association

In this, his second appearance on Cut to the Chase, Carles Esquerda, Director of the Alcione Association shares with us the closest distance Planet X will come to the Earth and the consequences of that, namely a devastating pole shift. This comes from Carlos Muñoz Ferrada, a professional Chilean Astronomer and a contemporary of V.M. Rabolu.

Carles also offers a unique insight into how people around the globe are taking an interest in Planet X, which according to him is a red-tailed planet, five times the size of Jupiter. At Yowusa.com we refer to Hercolubus as the smaller sister sun to our own Sol, a brown dwarf at the core of of what we refer to as the Planet X System.

http://yowusa.com
http://cttcradio.com   http://yowusa.com/radio/

http://yowusa.com/radio/index.shtml#now

steedy

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #23 on: April 16, 2014, 06:35:23 AM »
Sorry about the italics. I didn't mean to put them in there.   :-[

enlightenme

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #24 on: April 16, 2014, 07:37:12 AM »
Sorry about the italics. I didn't mean to put them in there.   :-[

No problem!  ;D