Author Topic: SEEDS...  (Read 9898 times)

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #75 on: July 05, 2017, 04:56:05 PM »
Thanks for input Ilinda,

The only thing that still puzzles me is that the potting soil was new and supposedly "sterile," if that is really ever possible with soil.  Maybe the fungal spores came from the potatoes themselves then.

Will look for Papa Chonca now!
My 94-year-old gardening friend, Bill, once told me that there is a term that potato sellers use to indicate that the seed potatoes they sell are free of virus.  IIRC, it is a term something like "Certified Virus-Free", but that's not it.  When I see the term I have the idea that the seed potatoes have been tissue cultured, or grown from sterile tissue cultures, so that what you receive is certified to be free of all pathogens, not just virus, but fungus, etc.

But as Bill and I discussed, the moment you place them in your ground you are once again exposing them to every pathogen that might be there.  He and I discussed the probability that it might not be worth the extra money.

Also, I read somewhere that misting, or lightly moistening each seed potato with hydrogen peroxide before planting can kill pathogens that the potato may harbor.

The guy who lists the Papa Chonca is in Wisconsin and grows hundreds of potatoes, so he may even have a website, in addition to his being listed on Seed Savers Exchange.  People can join SSE without being a "listed" member.  They can join as an unlisted member, who does not list anything they are growing, but still they have access to all the listings in the yearbook, as well as those that the SSE's Heritage Farm grows and sells every year in their own catalog.

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #76 on: July 05, 2017, 06:14:38 PM »
Quote
The guy who lists the Papa Chonca is in Wisconsin and grows hundreds of potatoes, so he may even have a website, in addition to his being listed on Seed Savers Exchange.

Ilinda, am guessing you may be referring to Curzio Caravati of the Kenosha Potato Project?  I wrote to him, and will let you know if he responds.  Papa Chonca seems to be exceedingly rare right now - for new gardeners who may be reading, this one's not to be confused with the Papa Cacho fingerling, which is much larger in size and red colored!

Will try your suggestion of dipping the Ozettes before replanting them, which I plan to do this week.

How wonderful that you have a 94 year-old friend who is still active in the garden!  Maybe we should consider starting a thread of valuable advice from old-timers? :)

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #77 on: July 06, 2017, 04:18:22 PM »
Quote
The guy who lists the Papa Chonca is in Wisconsin and grows hundreds of potatoes, so he may even have a website, in addition to his being listed on Seed Savers Exchange.

Ilinda, am guessing you may be referring to Curzio Caravati of the Kenosha Potato Project?  I wrote to him, and will let you know if he responds.  Papa Chonca seems to be exceedingly rare right now - for new gardeners who may be reading, this one's not to be confused with the Papa Cacho fingerling, which is much larger in size and red colored!

Will try your suggestion of dipping the Ozettes before replanting them, which I plan to do this week.

How wonderful that you have a 94 year-old friend who is still active in the garden!  Maybe we should consider starting a thread of valuable advice from old-timers? :)
Yes, Curzio is the guy!  I have to send him extra $, as he emailed me saying he got my check(s), one for Caribe, and one for Papa Chonca, but I didn't send enough, so it hopefully went out today.  If you order the Papa Cacho, let us know how it does.

I'm OK, with a new thread, but am also OK with using this thread for gardening tips and tricks from old-timers, as it's already established, plus many posts would be suitable for both this thread and another one.  I'm learning SO MUCH from our potato discussion.  Every time I go read in the Seed Saves Exchange Yearbook listing, I learn something.  For example, Curzio lists not only potatoes, but potatoes from TPS.  He knows so much!  Here is an excerpt:

"DS are initials of Doug Strong, a potato breeder in Washington state who is growing hundreds of potato strains he has received from Tom Wagner.  Many plants are diploid and Doug has been selecting for what we call "Papas Nativas" (Native Potatoes) potato tubers which look similar to what is usually harvested at very high altitude in the Andean Mountains of Peru.  This is a botanical seed harvested from potato seed berries which self-pollinated (not a controlled cross), therefore the TPS name matches with the female parent which self- or cross-pollinated with with unknown male parents.  (DS 2015-2A and DS 2015-2B are potato seed names)"

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...Update on potato experiment
« Reply #78 on: July 07, 2017, 12:04:02 PM »
Just a quick update:

Upon deeper inspection of the tub gardens, even though they had holes drilled in the bottom, they were waterlogged near the base - not a condition that makes for happy potatoes!

So, we emptied out the rich soil from all the potato tubs and utilized it elsewhere.  Tubs, instead, received a thick mat of hay on the bottom, followed by equal part peat moss, similar to the hugelkultur bed.  More holes were drilled, low on the sides rather than just at bottom.  Will even get some bricks to raise the tubs up and facilitate drainage.

I estimate there were around 72 Ozettes harvested of all different sizes, and some fairly large for a fingerling.  Not bad for a few weeks, so Ozette's claim to fame perhaps ought to be an extremely short growing period, as we discussed.  Also as mentioned, this does strongly suggest the possibility of more than one harvest per year, and perhaps more than 2 even.  I rinsed the good ones in peroxide, as Ilinda suggested, and also rolled them in diatomaceous earth and French clay.  Some were replanted, and some were put aside for seed, though it is early in the year to be attempting to bring a harvest forward as seed.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2017, 03:08:00 PM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...Update on potato experiment
« Reply #79 on: July 07, 2017, 05:50:26 PM »
Just a quick update:

Upon deeper inspection of the tub gardens, even though they had holes drilled in the bottom, they were waterlogged near the base - not a condition that makes for happy potatoes!

So, we emptied out the rich soil from all the potato tubs and utilized it elsewhere.  Tubs, instead, received a thick mat of hay on the bottom, followed by equal part peat moss, similar to the hugelkultur bed.  More holes were drilled, low on the sides rather than just at bottom.  Will even get some bricks to raise the tubs up and facilitate drainage.

I estimate there were around 72 Ozettes harvested of all different sizes, and some fairly large for a fingerling.  Not bad for a few weeks, so Ozette's claim to fame perhaps ought to be an extremely short growing period, as we discussed.  Also as mentioned, this does strongly suggest the possibility of more than one harvest per year, and perhaps more than 2 even.  I rinsed the good ones in peroxide, as Ilinda suggested, and also rolled them in diatomaceous earth and French clay.  Some were replanted, and some were put aside for seed, though it is early in the year to be attempting to bring a harvest forward as seed.
Wow, that is amazing about your early Ozette harvest.  How many days would you say they've been in soil?  It may be a record!

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #80 on: July 08, 2017, 09:40:27 AM »
Hi Ilinda,

Good sized mother tubers were sown June 13.  I seem to remember reading that Ozette is known for this under the right conditions.  Maybe the rich potting soil, minus all the rainwater, contributed to the favorable growth, as well as a sunny spot (the round galvanized tubs were on three concrete manhole covers to the septic system, which may also have contributed warmth, as June was still pretty cool here; they may also have contributed to the drainage problem). :)


BTW, I lost my entire crop of Purple Peruvians in all the moisture as well!  Will get seed in the fall and save it forward.

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #81 on: July 10, 2017, 03:23:44 PM »
Hi Ilinda,

Good sized mother tubers were sown June 13.  I seem to remember reading that Ozette is known for this under the right conditions.  Maybe the rich potting soil, minus all the rainwater, contributed to the favorable growth, as well as a sunny spot (the round galvanized tubs were on three concrete manhole covers to the septic system, which may also have contributed warmth, as June was still pretty cool here; they may also have contributed to the drainage problem). :)


BTW, I lost my entire crop of Purple Peruvians in all the moisture as well!  Will get seed in the fall and save it forward.
So it appears you planted Ozette on June 13 and harvested around July 8?  That is extremely fast.  Almost unbelievable.  But you have read some history that tells you that is possible, so i'll believe it.

My Caribe and Papa Chonca arrived today and I must say--tiny, tiny samples.  They are so small, I wonder if I should plant now or try to keep alive till next spring?  I lean toward NOW.

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #82 on: July 10, 2017, 04:44:33 PM »
Hi Ilinda,

Yes, the only reason that I harvested them so early is that they were starting to rot, which I discovered when I went to replant them further apart (the shoots were very crowded looking) or I might never have known they were producing anything.  I was just relieved that all was not lost.  Also, I began with 2# rather than one, which surely helped the tally, as well as including the very small ones, though I'm sure that much of the harvest was new growth because I had to pry each clump apart.  None of them had reached the full 7" potential size for Ozette, and I did get some odd V shaped ones as well, as mentioned here: http://vegetablesofinterest.typepad.com/vegetablesofinterest/2007/08/ozette-fingerli.html

This writer claims to have harvested 13 pounds from one single Ozette plant: https://agardenerstable.com/2016/11/04/save-that-potato-the-makah-ozette/

You must be excited that your seed potatoes arrived - Do you mind sharing what Curzio charged you for the Papa Chonca seed?

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #83 on: July 11, 2017, 03:59:17 PM »
Hi Ilinda,

Yes, the only reason that I harvested them so early is that they were starting to rot, which I discovered when I went to replant them further apart (the shoots were very crowded looking) or I might never have known they were producing anything.  I was just relieved that all was not lost.  Also, I began with 2# rather than one, which surely helped the tally, as well as including the very small ones, though I'm sure that much of the harvest was new growth because I had to pry each clump apart.  None of them had reached the full 7" potential size for Ozette, and I did get some odd V shaped ones as well, as mentioned here: http://vegetablesofinterest.typepad.com/vegetablesofinterest/2007/08/ozette-fingerli.html

This writer claims to have harvested 13 pounds from one single Ozette plant: https://agardenerstable.com/2016/11/04/save-that-potato-the-makah-ozette/

You must be excited that your seed potatoes arrived - Do you mind sharing what Curzio charged you for the Papa Chonca seed?
A very different "bio" for the Ozette, quite different from what I had read, but since they grow in such variety is size and shape, it can be expected I suppose.  Maybe later this fall, if my harvest of Papa Chonca is anything at all, perhaps we can trade:  1 Ozette for 1 Papa Chonca.  We'll see about the harvest first.

I'm embarrassed to admit being so desparate to have this Papa Chonca that I overpaid for both Caribe and Papa Chonca.  The listing in Seed Savers Exchange Yearbook says $5 for listed members for tuber order (price depends on whether listed, or unlisted, and whether small seed, large seed, biennials, or tubers/scions, etc.). 

I'm wincing now...I paid $40 (yes, 40) for the two orders and am pasting in Curzio's message to me after I send the correct amount of $5 each.  Here it is:
"Hey Linda,

just got your mail .. two letters with $5 each

I need at least $20 for a tuber order.  It takes hours to drive to the
post office, stand in line.

Should I just trash your checks?
Sorry, I'm not in the mood to dress up and walk into the cooler in
July!

Perhaps you can try again next year.

cheers, Curzio
"

Maybe I won't be so desparate in the future, but knowing what I know about the theme of this website, I want as many unusual and useful seeds NOW.  Next year might be too late.  Still, I'm so fascinated with your Ozette experience!  Also, Curzio wrote on the bag containing the Papa Chonca, "spreads like mint".  Well, that may not sound bad at all if times are hard and they survive the winter, then start growing when conditions are warmer.  Much to learn, for sure.

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #84 on: July 11, 2017, 05:36:31 PM »
Hours to the nearest post office in Kenosha?  :D 

If you message me your address I'll try to get a few Ozettes out to you tomorrow.

I would love a Papa Chonca from you, when the time comes! Thank you! :)

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #85 on: July 12, 2017, 04:28:58 PM »
Hours to the nearest post office in Kenosha?  :D 

If you message me your address I'll try to get a few Ozettes out to you tomorrow.

I would love a Papa Chonca from you, when the time comes! Thank you! :)
I did wonder about the "hours".  But after I read the sheet enclosed with my potato order, didn't feel so bad, and did not feel shortchanged.  He thanked me for my donation!  (Heck, I was not aware I was donating.) 

But he grows out hundreds of potatoes, and saves 12 from each, and said in his note if he receives 12 orders, each person only receives one tuber.  He said of the Caribe, he only had 6 left, shipped out three, one rotted, and I received two, or something like that.  I can see how strapped for time and cash it might make a potato grower/breeder.

Now, I DO appreciate the offer of Ozette.  Do you think there is still time?  I did just plant the Caribe and Papa Chonca, and when I harvest them, will be glad to send you a Papa Chonca.  Ok, am PM'ing you my snailmail.    Heck, I just ordered a unique watermelon because they talked about how they make jelly, mead, and something else from it, and it has a thinner rind--one that is not hard like some.  Update to follow on the watermelon.

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #86 on: July 12, 2017, 05:34:32 PM »
Watermelon jelly sounds delicious - Can't wait to learn more about that! :)

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #87 on: July 18, 2017, 06:28:32 PM »
Hours to the nearest post office in Kenosha?  :D 

If you message me your address I'll try to get a few Ozettes out to you tomorrow.

I would love a Papa Chonca from you, when the time comes! Thank you! :)
I did wonder about the "hours".  But after I read the sheet enclosed with my potato order, didn't feel so bad, and did not feel shortchanged.  He thanked me for my donation!  (Heck, I was not aware I was donating.) 

But he grows out hundreds of potatoes, and saves 12 from each, and said in his note if he receives 12 orders, each person only receives one tuber.  He said of the Caribe, he only had 6 left, shipped out three, one rotted, and I received two, or something like that.  I can see how strapped for time and cash it might make a potato grower/breeder.

Now, I DO appreciate the offer of Ozette.  Do you think there is still time?  I did just plant the Caribe and Papa Chonca, and when I harvest them, will be glad to send you a Papa Chonca.  Ok, am PM'ing you my snailmail.    Heck, I just ordered a unique watermelon because they talked about how they make jelly, mead, and something else from it, and it has a thinner rind--one that is not hard like some.  Update to follow on the watermelon.
Thank you for sending the Ozette.  I'm planning to plant them in large pots indoors until the heat dissipates a bit, as I'm not sure if 90's is good for starting potatoes.  They can get their start indoors and when we hit a cool spot, they can be easily moved outside.

While we're waiting for the Papa Chonca to mature, I sent you some unique winter squash seeds for next year, as it is too late for this year, this one being a long season crop, of about 120 days.
It is the Yamiken, from Peru.  It resembles Butternut, but is a bit sweeter, and a bit less watery.  They are best sliced into wedges and baked in an olive oiled skillet at about 250 deg. F for about 2 hours, covered.  Then uncover them for about 15 or so minutes, turning the wedges if necessary.  They will caramelize once the lid is removed and can burn, so watch them at this time.  They taste like candy if you get the caramelization just right.  If not, you have one of the most delicious squashes ever.  Harvest them only after they turn in color similar to butternut, and the stem is dry and brown.  Make sure there is no green left before harvest, and that is why to plant early.  Also, they love growing up a trellis--a strong one.  Water them only to get them started, but after established, do not water, and they will send roots down deep and get their own water.  No mulch, as that is a place for squash beetles to hide.

My friend who bought his first one at a farmer's market, asked the vender why they are so expensive, and he replied, "taste one and you'll know why". 

R.R. Book

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #88 on: July 19, 2017, 05:26:33 AM »
Ilinda,

I'm so glad the Ozettes got there safely.  Best wishes in growing them :)

How exciting that the Yamiken seeds are on the way here - Thank you so much!

ilinda

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Re: SEEDS...
« Reply #89 on: July 20, 2017, 04:38:25 PM »
Ilinda,

I'm so glad the Ozettes got there safely.  Best wishes in growing them :)

How exciting that the Yamiken seeds are on the way here - Thank you so much!
Just putting this "out there" that it is so hot, I wonder if any newly planted potatoes will survive.  We will find out, as everything seems to be a grand experiment.