Author Topic: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes  (Read 2481 times)

R.R. Book

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Re: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes
« Reply #30 on: July 17, 2017, 04:58:11 PM »
Beekeepers are always taught to wear white when tending their colonies, so that the bees won't think we're a bear.  Rusty from HoneyBeeSuite.com has this to say about that rule:

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The idea that dark clothes makes bees think you are a (pick one or more) bear, skunk, raccoon, dog, opossum, wolf, or insectivorous bird is ridiculous. Bees are not stupid...But we humans, thinking we are ever so brilliant, run around in these ridiculous white suits thinking we’re pulling one over on the bees. Believe me, the bees find this amusing.

ilinda

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Re: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes
« Reply #31 on: July 18, 2017, 06:18:20 PM »
Beekeepers are always taught to wear white when tending their colonies, so that the bees won't think we're a bear.  Rusty from HoneyBeeSuite.com has this to say about that rule:

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The idea that dark clothes makes bees think you are a (pick one or more) bear, skunk, raccoon, dog, opossum, wolf, or insectivorous bird is ridiculous. Bees are not stupid...But we humans, thinking we are ever so brilliant, run around in these ridiculous white suits thinking we’re pulling one over on the bees. Believe me, the bees find this amusing.
I don't think it is ridiculous at all to wear white when handling bees, for the very reason that many predators who like to steal honey do have black or very dark colored coats.  Plus the friend who helped hubby years ago get started in beekeeping said somethiing similar, plus he said the bees hated to see his wife coming and were always agitated at her presence, and it was mentioned that she had a full head of thick wavy, black hair which did resemble the head of a bear. 

True, bees are not stupid.  True, humans think they are ever so brilliant.  But wearing a white bee suit if you are afraid of being stung is not ridiculous.  Besides, if it is a hot summer day, which would most beekeepers prefer, assuming they still wear the suit--white or dark brown?  Plus we have the white bee suits and have no intention of throwing them out because someone tells us we look ridiculous.

R.R. Book

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Re: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes
« Reply #32 on: July 19, 2017, 05:21:50 AM »
Hi Ilinda,

I completely agree with wearing a bee suit for safety, unless working outside the hive.  I have seen people handle their bees - even deep in the brood nest - without one.  Jen Rasmussen is a very fine young person who does this with apparent grace and ease (see her series on intuitive beekeeping):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6-sn44dwT9U

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=37FiriWgGNc

We, too, have white bee suits - well they were white years ago anyway - and wouldn't think of using anything else :)




R.R. Book

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Re: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes
« Reply #33 on: July 20, 2017, 12:38:22 PM »
Posting a link to a Colorado State University study ranking flowers according to which ones are most important to honey bees. 

http://bspm.agsci.colostate.edu/files/2013/03/Ranking-of-Flowering-Plants-for-Use-by-Honey-Bees.pdf

Notably absent from this list is Melissa officinalis or lemon balm, which is named in Latin for honey bees and known at least in this area to be of crucial importance to them, partly because of its extended bloom time well into autumn, when little else is available.  The Herb Society of America has published a monograph on lemon balm explaining that the plant contains several phytochemicals necessary for bees to produce the pheromones which they use to communicate with each other.

For humans, lemon balm is a source of vitamin C, and a tea, hot or cold, made from it is calming to the nerves.

Posting a photo from the bee nectary garden:
« Last Edit: July 20, 2017, 01:53:33 PM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes
« Reply #34 on: July 20, 2017, 04:36:57 PM »
Posting a link to a Colorado State University study ranking flowers according to which ones are most important to honey bees. 

http://bspm.agsci.colostate.edu/files/2013/03/Ranking-of-Flowering-Plants-for-Use-by-Honey-Bees.pdf

Notably absent from this list is Melissa officinalis or lemon balm, which is named in Latin for honey bees and known at least in this area to be of crucial importance to them, partly because of its extended bloom time well into autumn, when little else is available.  The Herb Society of America has published a monograph on lemon balm explaining that the plant contains several phytochemicals necessary for bees to produce the pheromones which they use to communicate with each other.

For humans, lemon balm is a source of vitamin C, and a tea, hot or cold, made from it is calming to the nerves.

Posting a photo from the bee nectary garden:
Haven't been to the Colorado State Univ. site yet, but one thing I remember from Jacqueline Freeman's wonderful book, Song of Increase, is that she said if you plant for the bees, do a large enough planting to make it worth their while, as a few plants look nice, but they might be more inclined to visit a larger swath. 

A good example of this (accidental observation) is that last year there were lots of honey bees on our Sacred Basil/Holy Basil all year long until our frost in late October.  Daily I'd just stand and watch them, but the Holy Basil had almost taken over parts of the garden and it was OK then because it would have been weeds, had it not been Holy Basil.  The bees took advantage of that.  This year we have several smaller patches, but very few honeybees visiting those plants.  Instead I'm seeing them on other plants that are more prolific.

And I love the Lemon Balm and need to use it more, so your photo and discussion was a good reminder of its nerve-calming qualities.

R.R. Book

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Re: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes
« Reply #35 on: July 20, 2017, 05:26:56 PM »
Ilinda,

I will look for both Song of Increase and holy basil.  Am unfamiliar with both.  It sounds as if you've provided a wonderful habitat for bees on your farm - I hope you and hubby resume beekeeping :)

ilinda

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Re: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes
« Reply #36 on: July 21, 2017, 06:36:54 PM »
Ilinda,

I will look for both Song of Increase and holy basil.  Am unfamiliar with both.  It sounds as if you've provided a wonderful habitat for bees on your farm - I hope you and hubby resume beekeeping :)
You will absolutely LOVE her book.  After you've read it, I'd be interested in hearing from you.  It was a profound read for this chick.  Getting back to honeybees is on our list.

R.R. Book

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I found an electronic copy of Song of Increase, and must say that I am completely awestruck by it.

Author Jacqueline Freeman organizes her material in the same manner in which her own experience with bees is organized: her own private musings vs. information her bees have channeled to her.  Because much of Freeman's writing differs from conventional wisdom about bees, I'll include both where appropriate for comparison and contrast.

You know a book is going to be an emotional ride when part of the introduction leaves you crying:
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Each evening before bed, she and Joseph bless each animal and their farm.

The author begins by relating that it took her a good while, as a new beekeeper, to move from dependence upon the bee suit to being able to work her bees without one.  This transition came about by moving a chair near the hive and regularly sitting with the colony in meditation until she became an accepted member of their biome, and was no longer a separate entity from the Hive Mind:
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Might they be mirroring how I felt?  Or was I mirroring them?  Could it be that we were connected?

I will interject here that ancient rabbinical commentary on the Book of Genesis states that before the fall, Adam and Eve were able to communicate openly with the animal kingdom, so perhaps Freeman is recovering a primordial connection, rather than breaking new ground?

The long awaited moment of transition from visitor to member:
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When I held a finger next to the entrance, a sweet little bee delicately walked onto my fingertip and faced me.  She looked right into my eyes, and for the first time, we saw each other.

She describes having merged with the hive mind and body:
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I've felt distinct emotional and physical responses, such as when the bees described the quickening during the queen's elation-filled marital flight...

Freeman approaches the hive as one would a church or temple:
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I come to the hive as I would enter a holy place.  I come to the bees' presence with reverence, respect, gratitude and generosity.

And then she received the gift of awareness of a larger reality:
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Unknown to most humans, bees also work intimately with the unseen realms of nature spirits, elementals, and faeries.

Myopic Conventional Wisdom (CW) suggests that bees are at their most useful as chattel property whose dual purposes are to pollinate crops and provide humans with honey.  In contrast, Freeman describes their God-given imperative:
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In their world beyond the hive walls, bees bring life, song and spirit to all they touch, making their larger community a more vibrant, abundant place.

CW says that each bee must go his own separate way to forage, just as humans must go to their separate work.  What the bees said about that, in their own words:
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Bees have a group soul intact, never separate... In this evolution of the group soul, every hive has consciousness of every other hive.

The author continues, describing yet another gift that she received from the bees:
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...Most of us feel somewhat disconnected from our human history...Sitting quietly beside a bee hive...is one simple way of finding our way back to such a connection.  When we quiet our minds, we rediscover our goodness.

CW says that bees and plants exist in simple symbiosis, with one propagating the other.  Freeman greatly expands this relationship (again in the bees' words):
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After our touch, each plant has a rising helix, a chromatic chord, that joins earth, matter and ether.  The fecundity of the atmosphere is thus enhanced and enlivened.  Pollinating is much more than fertilization...Pollinating and the daily revitalizing of the ether is our task.

CW: Bees give us a few useful products, in honey, wax and propolis.  In contrast, Freeman explains that the thousand eyes of each bee magnify the light of the colony, wrapping each hive and bee in light, such that:
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The hive light is living food, living nourishment...Bees and their hives are temples of the spiritual world, source points of spiritual manna.

CW has led to the slippery slope of altering plant genetics and helped humans to rationalize spraying crops with chemicals first, while asking questions about their effects later.  What Freeman's bees explained to her about that:
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Pollen emits a sound vibration that fits neatly into the historic memory bees share.  When pollen is chemically altered, the atomic structure has a strange vibration that doesn't fit what we know as common perception and knowledge.

CW says that pollen has a dual purpose in the bee world, feeding bees and stimulating brood rearing.  In contrast, the bees said:
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As we collect and bring home the pollen, its vibration tunes us to a channel that bees work within.  Clear, pure pollen, rich with life force, directs us in the proper action and relationships with all that surrounds us.
  (Might organic food and cleansing fasts do the same for humans?  Thus the many sacred food rituals, including fasting, that have grown up around human meals and in human religions.)

The bees go on to say that the quality of the pollen directly affects the songs of the hive, which then affect the health of the entire colony:
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A hive altered by impaired pollen bears a dispiriting hollowness within its sound expression, which affects all levels of the hive.

Freeman enumerates the list of modern injuries to bees, such as hives being forced into migratory agricultural service and the prevalence of thousand-acre monoculture crops, to which the bees are quoted as saying,
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Monocultures are a betrayal of trust between bees and humankind.
 

With so many adversities facing bees, colony collapse is diagnosed as being the final solution, initiated by the bees themselves: mass suicide. 
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The bees sacrifice themselves so that their weakness doesn't carry forward.



« Last Edit: July 22, 2017, 11:23:30 AM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: Beekeeping in the Tribulation and Aftertimes
« Reply #38 on: July 22, 2017, 04:21:02 PM »
Thanks for posting about this most wondrous book written by such a forward-thinking person, Jacqueline Freeman.

One of the many take-away messages from the book is that the bees have told her that they came here to help humans evolve to become better beings, or something to that effect.  I'll certainly give them an "A" for making the attempt, and it's not over yet, so there's still hope for some of us.