Author Topic: BAJA CALIFORNIA - Geology and other info  (Read 853 times)

Yowbarb

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BAJA CALIFORNIA - Geology and other info
« on: October 21, 2010, 06:56:12 AM »
Some of the info in this Topic will also be posted in another Board, and sometimes that will be in Spanish.
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See:  SOUTH AMERICA

...
Gulf of California
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés or Vermilion Sea; locally known in the Spanish language as Mar de Cortés or Mar Bermejo or Golfo de California) is a body of water that separates the Baja California Peninsula from the Mexican mainland. It is bordered by the states of Baja California, Baja California Sur, Sonora, and Sinaloa with a coastline of approximately 2,500 mi (4,000 km). Rivers which flow into the Gulf of California include the Colorado, Fuerte, Mayo, Sinaloa, Sonora, and the Yaqui. The gulf's surface area is about 62,000 sq mi (160,000 km2). The name "Gulf of California" predominates on most maps in English today. The name "Sea of Cortés" is the one preferred by most local residents.
The Gulf is thought to be one of the most diverse seas on the planet, and is home to more than 5,000 species of macroinvertebrates.[1] Baja California itself is actually one of the longest, most isolated peninsulas in the world, second only to the Malay Peninsula in Southeast Asia.[2] The Gulf of California is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Extent
The International Hydrographic Organization defines the southern limit of the Gulf of California as: "A line joining Piastla Point (23°38'N) in Mexico, and the Southern extreme of Lower California".[3] The Gulf of California is 1,126 kilometers (700 mi) long and 48–241 kilometers (30–150 mi) wide, with an area of 177,000 square kilometers (68,000 sq mi), a mean depth of 818.08 meters (2,684.0 ft), and a volume of 145,000 cubic kilometers (34,985 cubic miles).[4]
The Gulf of California can be separated into three faunal regions, which include the Northern Gulf of California, the Central Gulf of California, and the Southern Gulf of California. One recognized transition zone is termed the Southwestern Baja California peninsula. Transition zones exist between faunal regions, and they usually vary for each individual species. Faunal regions are distinguishable based on the specific types of animals that are found there.[5]

Geology

Geologic evidence indicates that the Gulf of California came into being 1.3 million years ago as tectonic forces rifted the Baja California Peninsula off the North American Plate. As part of this process, the East Pacific Rise propagated up the middle of the Gulf along the seabed. This extension of the East Pacific Rise is often referred to as the Gulf of California Rift Zone. The Gulf would extend as far as Indio, California, except for the tremendous delta created by the Colorado River. This delta blocks the sea from flooding the Mexicali and Imperial Valleys. Volcanism dominates the East Pacific Rise. The island of Isla Tortuga is one example of this ongoing volcanic activity.[6]

Weather
The average temperature of the Pacific coast of Baja California is 16–24 °C (61–75 °F).[4] Even though the shores of the Gulf of California are generally sheltered from the continuous wave shock that is experienced by most other North American shores, storms known as a “chubasco” can cause significant damage to shorelines, despite their brevity.[2] Occasionally, the Northern Gulf of California will go through significantly cold winters

[Article continues]   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulf_of_California
« Last Edit: November 10, 2010, 09:06:21 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: BAJA CALIFORNIA - Geology and other info
« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2010, 01:56:19 PM »
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ae/Map_mexico_volcanoes.gif


Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (Eje Volcánico Transversal) also known locally as Sierra Nevada (Snowed Mountain Range),[1] is a volcanic belt that extends 900 km from west to east across central-southern Mexico. Several of its highest peaks have snow all year long, and during clear weather, they are visible to a large proportions of those who live in Mexico on the many high plateaus from which these volcanoes rise.

From the west, it runs from Jalisco east through northern Michoacán, southern Guanajuato, southern Querétaro, México State, southern Hidalgo, the Distrito Federal, northern Morelos, Puebla and Tlaxcala, to central Veracruz. The Mexican Plateau lies to the north, bounded by the Sierra Madre Occidental to the west and Sierra Madre Oriental to the east. The Cofre de Perote and Pico de Orizaba volcanoes, in Puebla and Veracruz, mark the meeting of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt with the Sierra Madre Oriental. To the south, the basin of the Balsas River lies between the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt and the Sierra Madre del Sur. This area is also a distinct physiographic province of the larger Sierra Madre System physiographic division.

The highest point, also the highest point in Mexico, is Pico de Orizaba (5636 m) also known as Citlaltépetl, located at 19°01′N 97°16′W / 19.017°N 97.267°W / 19.017; -97.267. This, and several of the other high peaks, are active or dormant volcanoes; other notable volcanoes in the range include (from west to east) Nevado de Colima (4339 m), Parícutin (2774 m), Nevado de Toluca (4577 m), Popocatépetl (5452 m), Iztaccíhuatl (5286 m), Matlalcueitl (4461 m) Cofre de Perote (4282 m) and Sierra Negra, a companion of the Pico de Orizaba (4580 m).

The mountains are home to the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt pine-oak forests, one of the Mesoamerican pine-oak forests ecoregions.

[edit] References
1.^ México, estructuras, política, económica y social
A. Gómez-Tuena, Ma.T. Orozco-Esquivel, and L. Ferrari Igneous Petrogenesis of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, Ch 5, pp. 129-182, in Susana A. Alaniz-Álvarez and Angel F. Nieto-Samaniego, eds., Geology of México, Geological Society of America Special Paper 422, 2007 ISBN 978-0813724225
« Last Edit: October 21, 2010, 02:05:16 PM by Yowbarb »

noproblemo2

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Re: BAJA CALIFORNIA - Geology and other info
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2011, 07:45:04 AM »
It's VERY windy/gusty here today expected to last thru noon tomorrow. Lots of tree debris coming down on the house also.