Author Topic: Northern lights viewed in northern Europe  (Read 5821 times)

Yowbarb

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Northern lights viewed in northern Europe
« on: October 31, 2010, 02:33:07 AM »
Aurora Borealis, also known as Revontulet (I think) in Finland.
- Yowbarb

Spaceweather

http://spaceweather.com/

HALLOWEEN FLARES: After two days of quiet, big sunspot 1117 is once again crackling with solar flares. Magnetic fields around the active region became unstable on Oct. 31st, unleashing a C2-class flare at 0318 UT and a C6-class flare at 0431 UT. Stay tuned for movies.

AMAZING HALOES: Yesterday in Kittilä, Finland, photographer Sauli Koski witnessed a brief but unforgettable display when the rising sun shone through a morning cloud of wintery ice crystals. Fortunately he had his camera:
"These were the best ice haloes I have ever seen," says Koski. "They were there for only about 10 minutes and then gone. What a delight!"

"It was a gem of a halo display," agrees atmospheric optics expert Les Cowley. "Koski saw at least 13 different arcs. Some, including two types of Parry arc, are rare. Three more arcs, the helic, Parry supralateral arc, and Moilanen arc are exceedingly rare. See the key for the arc identities. With winter fast approaching, now is the time for outstanding halos."

« Last Edit: November 01, 2010, 05:17:48 PM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Northern Lights, Aurora Borealis, Revontulet in Scandinavia
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2010, 09:58:52 AM »
http://spaceweather.com/  Space Weather

AURORA WATCH: A solar wind stream is buffeting Earth's magnetic field, sparking geomagnetic activity around the Arctic Circle. "I was driving through the countryside near Tromsø, Norway, on Nov. 14th when bright auroras burst through the clouds," reports Ole Christian Salomonsen. He quickly pulled over to take this picture:
http://spaceweather.com/aurora/images2010/14nov10/Ole-Christian-Salomonsen2.jpg


"The lights were amazing--green, white, purple, moving fast and strong," says Salomonsen. "I call the shot 'Colorful Clouds.'"
NOAA forecasters estimate a 40% chance of geomagnetic activity during the next 24 hours. High latitude sky watchers should remain alert for auroras.


Øystein Lunde Ingvaldsen,
Bø in Vesterålen, Norway
Nov. 14, 2010 #1, #2, #3, more
http://spaceweather.com/aurora/images2010/14nov10/Aystein-Lunde-Ingvaldsen1.jpg

Yowbarb

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Re: Northern Lights, Aurora Borealis, Revontulet in Scandinavia
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2010, 10:03:16 AM »
Also by Ingvaldsen. More lovely photographs, also by other photopgraphers, on Space.com
 - Yowbarb
...
http://spaceweather.com/     

Øystein Lunde Ingvaldsen,
Bø in Vesterålen, Norway
Nov. 14, 2010
http://spaceweather.com/aurora/images2010/14nov10/Aystein-Lunde-Ingvaldsen3.jpg


Yowbarb

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Re: Northern Lights, Aurora Borealis, Revontulet in Scandinavia
« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2010, 07:26:14 PM »
Well, this is not a photo of northern lights, but it is beautiful.
- Yowbarb

This was the most spectacular sun halo I have seen in recent years from Stockholm," says photographer Peter Rosén. "It was visible for the whole (short) day." In addition to the sundogs, upper tangent arc, and 22° halo captured in the snapshot above, Rosén also witnessed "a 46° outer halo and a circumzenithal arc as ice crystals blew in gusts across the sun. What a show!"

Now is the time of year when low-hanging suns shine through high-floating ice to produce such vistas. People of the northern hemisphere should be alert for halos.

more images: from Jörgen Blom of Stockholm, Sweden; from Merelyn Davis of Burbank, CA; from Paul Ballard of Kungälv, Sweden; from Gary Brekke of Fargo, ND; from Shawn Johnston of Fargo, ND; from Joanna Fengler of Poznan, Poland




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Yowbarb

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Re: Northern Lights, Aurora Borealis, Revontulet in Scandinavia
« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2011, 07:39:03 AM »
Jan 07 Update 

GEOMAGNETIC STORM: As expected, a solar wind stream hit Earth's magnetic field during the early hours of Jan. 7th. The impact sparked a G1-class (Kp=5) geomagnetic storm and bright auroras around the Arctic Circle.
Spaceweather posted images from Kjetil Skogli, Bernt Olsen of Tromsø, Frank Olsen  -Tromsø, Norway
http://spaceweather.com/
Image below of from Frank Olsen. - Yowbarb 
« Last Edit: January 07, 2011, 07:40:45 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Northern Lights, Aurora Borealis, Revontulet in Scandinavia
« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2011, 07:43:21 AM »
From http://spaceweather.com/ 
Image below from Kjetil Skogli:

Yowbarb

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Re: Northern Lights, Aurora Borealis, Revontulet in Scandinavia
« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2011, 07:46:06 AM »
From http://spaceweather.com/ image taken yesterday during the G1 K=5 Geomagnetic Storm.
This one is from Bernt Olsen:

Yowbarb

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Northern lights viewed in northern Europe
« Reply #7 on: January 07, 2011, 07:54:17 AM »
http://spaceweather.com/

GEOMAGNETIC STORM:
As expected, a solar wind stream hit Earth's magnetic field during the early hours of Jan. 7th. The impact sparked a G1-class (Kp=5) geomagnetic storm and bright auroras around the Arctic Circle [The display began with a faint band in the north and quickly developed into several spectacular waves with extreme high speed rays.]

The lights were so intense, they could be seen as far away as Northern Ireland. "The glow was faint, but definitely there," reports Martin McKenna of Maghera, Co. Derry.

Yowbarb

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Re: Northern Lights, Aurora Borealis, Revontulet in Scandinavia
« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2011, 12:47:57 PM »
http://spaceweather.com/

NORTHERN LIGHTS:
Last night in Tromsø, Norway, the solar wind combined with moonlight and snow to produce a scene that had onlookers asking themselves, can it get any better than this?
One of those onlookers was Thilo Bubek, and he took this picture:
"The whole evening was a perfect show with strong auroras in many colours," says Bubek. "We were able to capture some fantastic images."

......A solar wind stream is due to hit Earth's magnetic field on Jan. 14-15, possibly sparking even stronger displays. NOAA forecasters estimate a 30% chance of high-latitude geomagnetic activity when the solar wind stream arrives.


http://spaceweather.com/

Ed Douglas

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Re: Northern Lights, Aurora Borealis, Revontulet in Scandinavia
« Reply #9 on: January 14, 2011, 02:53:27 PM »
Wow!  Just Wow!   ed

Yowbarb

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Re: Northern Lights, Aurora Borealis, Revontulet in Scandinavia
« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2011, 10:18:03 AM »
Ed - more interesting phenomenae - you have heard of this (I had not.)
Strange sounds in the areas where auroras are viewed.  Article mentioned in spaceweather coverage of auroras. Learned a bit more just now...
- Yowbarb

http://www2.gi.alaska.edu/ScienceForum/ASF10/1096.html  Hark The Northern Lights
Alaska Science Forum  Article #1096
by Carla Helfferich  August 12, 1992
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Spaceweather  http://spaceweather.com/

GREEN SNOW: "Last night (Jan. 25th) was amazing. It was the first time in my life I have seen auroras so bright and clear," reports Bjarki Mikkelsen from a little Arctic village in northern Sweden. The display was so intense, even the snow turned green:
"I also thought I could hear a strange sound http://www2.gi.alaska.edu/ScienceForum/ASF10/1096.html  coming from the Northern Lights," he adds.
"I've decided to stay here to get another chance to experience this again." 

Another chance is in the offing. A coronal hole in the sun's eastern hemisphere is spewing a stream of solar wind, due to hit Earth about a week from now. High-latitude sky watchers should be alert for auroras on Feb 1st or 2nd.

...
« Last Edit: January 26, 2011, 10:42:58 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Northern Lights, Aurora Borealis, Revontulet in Scandinavia
« Reply #11 on: January 26, 2011, 10:31:47 AM »
OK I found a little about the sounds:

AKR Auroral kilometric radiation


Earth's Cries Recorded in Space
amore101
July 2008

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e8-3dsEQ3_I      1:13   18,334 Views

Earth emits an ear-piercing series of chirps and whistles that could be heard by anyone who might be listening, astronomers have discovered. Scientists have known about the radiation since the 1970s. It is created high above the planet, where charged particles from the solar wind collide with Earth's magnetic field. It is related to the phenomenon that generates the colorful aurora, or Northern Lights.

Our planet is also known to hum, a mysterious low-frequency sound thought to be caused by the churning ocean or the roiling atmosphere.

The radio waves are blocked by the ionosphere, a charged layer atop our atmosphere, so they do not reach Earth. That's good, because the out-of-this-world radio waves are 10,000 times stronger than even the strongest military signal, the researchers said, and they would overwhelm all radio stations on the planet.

Theorists had long figured the radio waves, which were not well studied, oozed into space in an ever-widening cone, like light from a torch.

But new data from the European Space Agency's Cluster mission, a group of four high-flying satellites, reveals the bursts of radio waves head off to the cosmos in beam-like fashion, instead.

This means they're more detectable to anyone who might be listening.

The Auroral Kilometric Radiation (AKR), as it is called, is beamed out in a narrow plane, as if someone had put a mask over a torch and left a slit for the radiation to escape.

The knowledge of this flat beam could also be used by Earth's astronomers to detect planets around other stars, if they can build a new radio telescope big enough for the search. They could also learn more about Jupiter and Saturn by studying AKR, which should emit from the auroral activity on those worlds, too.

"Whenever you have aurora, you get AKR," said Robert Mutel, a University of Iowa researcher involved in the work.

The AKR bursts -- Mutel and colleagues studied 12,000 of them -- originate in spots the size of a large city a few thousand miles above Earth and above the region where the Northern Lights form.

"We can now determine exactly where the emission is coming from," Mutel said.
AKR

Yowbarb

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Re: Northern Lights, Aurora Borealis, Revontulet in Scandinavia
« Reply #12 on: January 26, 2011, 10:36:38 AM »
Listening to Northern Lights
hearvox
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eHvdZdsIZxg  7:46

March 14, 2007 |
 A Minnesota Planetarium Video- Natural Radio: When solar flares hit the Earth's magnetic field, the skies at both poles can light up with auroras. The particles also create very low frequency electromagnetic waves, a type of natural radio that can be picked up around the globe. Every year sound recordist Steve McGreevy heads north where the reception is best and points his receiver at the sky. Made for use in the Planetarium dome, thus the circular frame of the images)
...........................


ASEEKERTOO

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Re: Northern Lights, Aurora Borealis, Revontulet in Scandinavia
« Reply #13 on: January 26, 2011, 01:17:33 PM »
hows that for synchronicity. I came across the same video independently of seeing this post lol. I was amazed that the northern
lights put out such an eerie sound from low-frequency emanations. Enjoyed the pictures, they are great !
« Last Edit: January 26, 2011, 05:42:53 PM by AseekerToo »
Ancient Prophecy appears to be fulfilled in the Nightly News.

Yowbarb

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Re: Northern Lights, Aurora Borealis, Revontulet in Scandinavia
« Reply #14 on: January 26, 2011, 02:05:29 PM »
hows that for syncronicity. I came across the same video independently of seeing this post lol. I was amazed that the northern
lights put out such an eerie sound from low-frequency emanations. Enjoyed the pictures, they are great !

That is funny. Syn-cron-i -ci -ty  :)
What lead me to the videos today was the spaceweather article. Saw it last night.
In the section wehre they post aurora borealis photos and there is a little description...
- Yowbarb