Author Topic: Food  (Read 5102 times)

noproblemo2

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Food
« on: December 17, 2010, 12:27:18 PM »
FOOD
Apple Cider Vinegar
Apple Sauce
Baking Soda
Baking Powder
Beans
Black Pepper
Box Milk
Box Juices
Can Bacon
Can tomato paste
Can Tomatoes
Can Corn
Can Peas
Can Green Beans
Can Spinach
Can Spaghetti Sauce
Canned Yams
Coffee
Flour
Garlic
Honey
Jams & Jellies
Ketchup
Pastas
Pineapple
Rice
Salt
Soups
Spam
Molasses
Mustard
Sugar
Tuna
White Vinegar
 

Grains, Bread, Cereals, and Pastas
#10 Mountain House Beef Stroganoff W/Noodles (10 cups per can)
#10 Mountain House Chicken Teriyaki W/Rice (9.5 cups)
#10 Mountain House Lasasgna w/meat & Sauce (10 cups per can)
#10 Mountain House Macaroni & Cheese (10 cups per can)
#10 Mountain House Pasta Primavera
#10 cans Mountain House Rice (18 cups per can)
#10 Mountain House Rice & Chicken (8 cups per can)
#10 Mountain House Spaghetti W/Meat Sauce (10 cups per can)
#10 Sweet N Sour Pork
Baking Powder
Corn Meal
Cream of Wheat
Flour
Oatmeal
Pastas
Soups 
Yeast
Baking Powder is a faster rising substitute for yeast in biscuits, etc.

Meat & Protein
Baked Beans
Black Eyed Peas
Chicken Broth 
Chunk Tuna 
Chili with Beans
Cans Yoder’s canned Bacon
Canned Barbeque Pork
Cans Yoder’s cooked beef chunks
Cans Beanie Weenies 
Cans Yoder’s cooked hamburger
Cans Yoder’s cooked pork sausage
Cans Yoder’s cooked pork chunks 
Canned Peanuts
Kidney Beans
Lima Beans
#10 Mountain House Beef Chunks
#10 Mountain House Beef Stew
#10 Mountain House Beef Stroganoff
#10 Mountain House Chicken Stew
#10 Mountain House Chicken Teriyaki
#10 Mountain House Chili Mac
#10 Mountain House Chunk Chicken
#10 Mountain House Ground Beef
#10 Mountain House Ham Chunks
#10 Mountain House Turkey
#10 Mountain House Turkey Tetrazzini
#10 Mountain House Vegetable Stew
Navy Beans
Peanut Butter
Pinto Beans
Pork N Beans
Spam

Dairy
Can Butter
Evaporated milk
#10 Can powdered buttermilk
#10Canned Cheeses 
#10 Cottage Cheese


Fats & Oils
Corn Oil
#10 cans Crisco
Canned butter
PAM cooking spray

Note: Corn oil has a shelf life of about 2 years before it goes rancid but Crisco has a shelf life of 3-5 years.

Sweets
Brown Sugar
Honey
Jams
Jellies
Molasses 
Sugar
« Last Edit: December 19, 2010, 11:11:26 AM by BajaSusan »

Jimfarmer

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Re: Food
« Reply #1 on: December 22, 2010, 09:03:20 AM »
From http://community.wddty.com/blogs/health_from_your_garden/archive/2010/12/09/Olive-days-of-yore.aspx

[start quote]
Olive days of yore

I have just finished hand-harvesting our olives and those of our friends - some 800 kilos in all were gathered up. It was four long days of satisfying exercise on sunny wintery days for four 60- and 70-year-olds. There were no motorized tree shakers to reduce our labours, and no help from the sons of our Spanish friends.

Lunch was cooked over a wood fire with an exchange of views about what has been lost in traditional ways and farming in the past ten years.  We were surrounded by abandoned olive, almond, and orange groves. Ten years ago we would have been surrounded by large family groups, with grandparents, parents and children enjoying and benefiting from the exercise, the sense of community and the health-giving qualities of the extra virgin, cold-pressed olive oil produced on the village or family olive mill and press. Most presses have now disappeared and those villagers that do still harvest olives have to travel to large factory mills up to 50 kilometres away where their olives are mixed with those of others. Luckily, our friends have invested in a small home mill and press so our own olives are producing olive oil as pure as you can get.

Our olive trees have been fertilized only with sheep manure and sprayed against insects and fungi with natural ecological sprays.  We don’t use chemical products as do most commercial olive farms.

Perhaps we spend a full day a week growing and processing our ecological products, but we don’t need to visit supermarkets and we spend less money. One thing not on our shopping list is the typical medications for the over-50s.

© Clodagh and Richard Handscombe
Holistic gardeners and authors living in Spain for 25 years. Details of their books etc will be found on
www.gardeninginspain.com. December 2010.
Published 09 December 2010 12:01 by Bryan Hubbard
Comments
     
Antoine said:

Since olive leaves are known to kill micro-organisms, you might considder the use of olive leave tea... Just a thought
[end quote]

Yowbarb

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Re: Food
« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2011, 07:23:28 AM »
Jim,
good data on the anti microbial properties of olive leaves.
Going to quote you over in the medicinal foods topic.
I think we should all add olive leaf tea, olives olive seeds and all to our lists...
I am not sure but maybe the olives themselves have some health benefits like that...
One thing I had posted awhile back was the idea of having sproutlings and seedlings and little trees of
various types, inside a metal container, and when the weather changes get worse, water everything good
and then seal it. We will need trees like olive trees and grape vines in the future.
Thanks,
Yowbarb

Terigaddy

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Re: Food = 25 yr. shelf life good price
« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2011, 06:30:13 AM »
Just found this site for food.

http://wisefoodinsurance.com/survival-gear/emergency-food-56-servings

Their prices seem a bit lower than others.


noproblemo2

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Re: Food = 25 yr. shelf life good price
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2011, 06:32:29 AM »
Just found this site for food.

http://wisefoodinsurance.com/survival-gear/emergency-food-56-servings

Their prices seem a bit lower than others.
Thanks, we need to get food wherever we can now.

bk

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Re: Food
« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2014, 07:02:56 PM »
Here is a site where you can order canned beef, pork, chicken, turkey, ground beef, and corned beef hash.

http://www.keystonemeats.com/home/products.php

Yowbarb

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Re: Food
« Reply #6 on: March 01, 2014, 04:16:43 PM »
Here is a site where you can order canned beef, pork, chicken, turkey, ground beef, and corned beef hash.

http://www.keystonemeats.com/home/products.php

Thanks, bk. This looks like a pretty good site.
- Yowbarb

bk

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Re: Food
« Reply #7 on: June 05, 2014, 04:03:07 PM »
Here is another article from the Ready Store on how to make your own MREs.

How to Make Your Own MREs
Written by Brandon Garrett

MREs have been feeding our military for decades and there is a lot of science and testing that goes into these Meals-Ready-to-Eat.

In fact, the military has a whole department that is in charge of development of these unique meals. These meals are scientifically designed and crafted to have a 5 year shelf life and be immediately edible at any time. The metalized bags are also a high enough quality that you can throw them on a heat source and it won’t melt the bag or leak onto the food.

So, while creating your own MREs, there are some limitations. While a typical MRE has prepared, wet food inside. These homemade MREs will contain freeze-dried food and include a packet of water. Most Mylar bags are able to handle hot liquids (like boiled water) but aren’t necessarily meant for cooking in. You’ll have to find a military-grade metal bag that is strong enough to cook on a direct heat source if you want to make a true MRE. When you’re ready to eat the food, just open up the homemade MRE, pour in the water and eat away!

for the rest of the article
http://www.thereadystore.com/diy/6287/how-to-make-your-own-mres/?utm_source=rne_monday_20140414b--google--organic&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=monday--content--make_mre&utm_content=main_content_btn&trk_msg=8Q82D3UF705KL8VHCFG3T5KRHO&trk_contact=T8U4UKNVGRVIM2H073MBUB0NG0

Check out the comments section also some mention on where to get Mylar bags

Yowbarb

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Re: Food
« Reply #8 on: June 05, 2014, 05:55:13 PM »
Here is another article from the Ready Store on how to make your own MREs.

How to Make Your Own MREs
Written by Brandon Garrett

MREs have been feeding our military for decades and there is a lot of science and testing that goes into these Meals-Ready-to-Eat.

In fact, the military has a whole department that is in charge of development of these unique meals. These meals are scientifically designed and crafted to have a 5 year shelf life and be immediately edible at any time. The metalized bags are also a high enough quality that you can throw them on a heat source and it won’t melt the bag or leak onto the food.

So, while creating your own MREs, there are some limitations. While a typical MRE has prepared, wet food inside. These homemade MREs will contain freeze-dried food and include a packet of water. Most Mylar bags are able to handle hot liquids (like boiled water) but aren’t necessarily meant for cooking in. You’ll have to find a military-grade metal bag that is strong enough to cook on a direct heat source if you want to make a true MRE. When you’re ready to eat the food, just open up the homemade MRE, pour in the water and eat away!

for the rest of the article
http://www.thereadystore.com/diy/6287/how-to-make-your-own-mres/?utm_source=rne_monday_20140414b--google--organic&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=monday--content--make_mre&utm_content=main_content_btn&trk_msg=8Q82D3UF705KL8VHCFG3T5KRHO&trk_contact=T8U4UKNVGRVIM2H073MBUB0NG0

Check out the comments section also some mention on where to get Mylar bags

bk, what a great idea!
If a person (or a team) could do some bulk cooking of these meals and properly package them, wow what a saving!
 :)

Yowbarb

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Re: Food
« Reply #9 on: November 10, 2015, 10:20:16 PM »
Just a thought or two.. I have these thoughts posted before, in other Topics, the importance for a survival group to make some of their own food. Foods such as homemade yogurt and sprouting could save many lives.

I am just going to post a couple ideas...maybe this will help someone. Will post more later.

1) battery operated yogurt maker (no idea where to get one.) Who knows?!

2) sprouter set up

ilinda

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Re: Food
« Reply #10 on: November 13, 2015, 06:30:03 AM »
Just a thought or two.. I have these thoughts posted before, in other Topics, the importance for a survival group to make some of their own food. Foods such as homemade yogurt and sprouting could save many lives.

I am just going to post a couple ideas...maybe this will help someone. Will post more later.

1) battery operated yogurt maker (no idea where to get one.) Who knows?!

2) sprouter set up
Never heard of a battery-operated yogurt maker, but didn't some tribes carry the milk around in animal skin pouches, draped on their bodies, and it was the body heat that allowed the fermentation to take place?  I know I read that somewhere--somewhere where they also made yak butter, so it seems probably somewhere in Asia?  I know body heat temperature sn't as warm as many use for yogurt but it would still make a kefir or something in between kefir, buttermilk, and yogurt. 

If I were in a (non-migratory) situation needing to make yogurt with no electricity, I'd boil water and place it in a thick-walled crock, and monitor the temp. carefully until it's where I want (around 115 deg. F for full-fat yogurt), and then place the jar/s in that, with thick cover and wool insulation.  It might take a bit of tweaking to get the temp. where you want it, but once it's there, the entire thing, crock, water, yogurt-to-be, will retain lots of heat for quite some time if well insulated.

Sprouting grains is easy w/o electricity.   The first 8-12 hours, they can soak in water.  Then after rinsing and draining, they can be covered lightly, out of sun, and at room temp., and they narturally begin to sprout if seeds aren't old.  No electricity is needed to sprout grains, but they need to be rinsed regularly, like 2X/day.  Hubby and I have sprouted grains and/or black'eyed peas, and/or garbanzos off and on for years for our goats.

The latest setup is sprouting wheat (ancient varieties such as spelt, etc., are better) and one thing that has improved our sprouting is to change from 1/2 gallon jars to plastic rectangular containers (we recycle the thin containers with built-in lids, specifically designed for spinach, arugula, etc.).  With the half-gallon jars, the grains sat on top of each other and the weight was somehow a bit much and inhibited germination, whereas the wide, long spinach containers allow everything to spread out better, giving much better sprouting rates.  Maybe I should post a photo.

Yowbarb

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Re: Food
« Reply #11 on: November 13, 2015, 06:37:20 AM »
Just a thought or two.. I have these thoughts posted before, in other Topics, the importance for a survival group to make some of their own food. Foods such as homemade yogurt and sprouting could save many lives.

I am just going to post a couple ideas...maybe this will help someone. Will post more later.

1) battery operated yogurt maker (no idea where to get one.) Who knows?!

2) sprouter set up
Never heard of a battery-operated yogurt maker, but didn't some tribes carry the milk around in animal skin pouches, draped on their bodies, and it was the body heat that allowed the fermentation to take place?  I know I read that somewhere--somewhere where they also made yak butter, so it seems probably somewhere in Asia?  I know body heat temperature sn't as warm as many use for yogurt but it would still make a kefir or something in between kefir, buttermilk, and yogurt. 

If I were in a (non-migratory) situation needing to make yogurt with no electricity, I'd boil water and place it in a thick-walled crock, and monitor the temp. carefully until it's where I want (around 115 deg. F for full-fat yogurt), and then place the jar/s in that, with thick cover and wool insulation.  It might take a bit of tweaking to get the temp. where you want it, but once it's there, the entire thing, crock, water, yogurt-to-be, will retain lots of heat for quite some time if well insulated.

Sprouting grains is easy w/o electricity.   The first 8-12 hours, they can soak in water.  Then after rinsing and draining, they can be covered lightly, out of sun, and at room temp., and they narturally begin to sprout if seeds aren't old.  No electricity is needed to sprout grains, but they need to be rinsed regularly, like 2X/day.  Hubby and I have sprouted grains and/or black'eyed peas, and/or garbanzos off and on for years for our goats.

The latest setup is sprouting wheat (ancient varieties such as spelt, etc., are better) and one thing that has improved our sprouting is to change from 1/2 gallon jars to plastic rectangular containers (we recycle the thin containers with built-in lids, specifically designed for spinach, arugula, etc.).  With the half-gallon jars, the grains sat on top of each other and the weight was somehow a bit much and inhibited germination, whereas the wide, long spinach containers allow everything to spread out better, giving much better sprouting rates.  Maybe I should post a photo.

ilinda - great ideas!
:)

Socrates

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ALCOHOL
« Reply #12 on: May 07, 2017, 07:18:07 PM »
There are 4 sources of CALORIES:
- carbohydrates
- fats
- proteins
- alcohol

In 'western' culture alcohol [25% of our options!!!] is downgraded to something 'unethical' or 'evil'. Hey; it's just nature...
You drown a hive and what do you get? MEAD... (Imagine what that means to a starving hunter-gatherer...)

As Daniel Vitalis [heathfood guru] argues so eloquently, our options in nutrition are all evolutionary and cultural, i.e. it's rather facetious and elitist to assume we actually know what we're talking about [i.e. conventionally...].
We now look down on consuming fats and even 'too many' proteins, and what do you think we do in regard to alcohol? As i have argued here before, it is just one of the 4 sources of calories we humans have at our disposal... Excepting distilled options [the actual source of the word "alcohol" is Arabic in origin and refers to the distillation process] [distilled: liquors; natural: wines, brews, etc.], alcohol is the result of quite naturally occuring processes (and, hence, there's really no rational reason to fear it).

Hey; there are only 4 souces of calories and calories are everything in a survival situation; are you really gonna snub alcohol...? For what reason?
[No, really; answer that question for yourself if you have a problem with this.]
Fact is that in the realm of calories alcohol is second only to fats in caloric density:
- 9 calories/gram: fats
- 7 calories/gram: alcohol
- 4 calories/gram: both carbohydrates & proteins

In nutrition and health people tend to get lost in details:
- hydration
- vitamins
- fats [omega 3, 6, 9 and 'bad' fats of all kinds]
- carbs
- proteins [amino acids]
- hormones [including 'Vit' D]
- enzymes
- minerals
But in a survival situation, it's all about calories. And alcohol provides these abundantly.
Just sayin'...
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