Author Topic: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?  (Read 56152 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #15 on: July 12, 2010, 02:40:17 PM »
Rocky Boy reservation will get some help:
The White House

Office of the Press Secretary

For Immediate Release July 10, 2010
President Obama Signs Montana Disaster Declaration
The President today declared a major disaster exists in the State of Montana and ordered Federal aid to supplement State and local recovery efforts in the area struck by severe storms and flooding beginning on June 15, 2010, and continuing.

Federal funding is available to State and eligible local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged by the severe storms and flooding in Hill County and the Rocky Boy

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #16 on: July 14, 2010, 01:59:12 PM »
Turn the volume down a bit before you play this one. Wow these boys are loud.

Cree Confederation NLC Pow wow 2010
redwolfboy

Prince Albert Pow wow,

Cree Confederation NLC Pow wow 2010

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #17 on: July 21, 2010, 10:49:18 AM »
http://www.romanticlovesecrets.com/images-nativeamerican.jpg



Native American Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce Nation

"Hear me, my chiefs, I am tired. My heart is sick and sad.
From where the sun now stands, I will fight no more forever."

Native American Quotes
A collection of Native American quotes;
inspirational words of great Indian wisdom

Traditional people of Indian nations have interpreted the two roads that face the light-skinned race as the road to technology and the road to spirituality. We feel that the road to technology.... has led modern society to a damaged and seared earth. Could it be that the road to technology represents a rush to destruction, and that the road to spirituality represents the slower path that the traditional native people have traveled and are now seeking again? The earth is not scorched on this trail. The grass is still growing there.
William Commanda, Mamiwinini, Canada, 1991

It is better to return a borrowed pot with a little something you last cooked in it.
Native American Proverb


If the white man wants to live in peace with the Indian, he can live in peace. Treat all men alike. Give them all the same law. Give them all an even chance to live and grow. All men were made by the same Great Spirit Chief. They are all brothers. The Earth is the mother of all people, and all people should have equal rights upon it. Let me be a free man, free to travel, free to stop, free to work, free to trade where I choose my own teachers, free to follow the religion of my fathers, free to think and talk and act for myself, and I will obey every law, or submit to the penalty." - Quotes by Chief Joseph, Nez Perce Native American Tribe


We are now about to take our leave and kind farewell to our native land, the country the Great Spirit gave our Fathers, we are on the eve of leaving that country that gave us birth, it is with sorrow we are forced by the white man to quit the scenes of our childhood... we bid farewell to it and all we hold dear.
- Quotes by Charles Hicks, Tsalagi Cherokee Vice Chief
speaking of The Trail of Tears, Nov. 4, 1838


The Great Spirit Chief who rules above all will smile upon this land... and this time the Indian race is waiting and praying. - Quotes by Chief Joseph, Nez Perces


Do not judge your neighbor until you walk two moons in his moccasins.
- Native American Proverb


An Indian respects a brave man, but he despises a coward.
- Quotes by Chief Joseph, Nez Perces Tribe


Tell me and I'll forget. Show me and I may not remember. Involve me and I'll understand.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2010, 07:19:53 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #19 on: October 27, 2010, 01:27:04 PM »
This site provided by: Member BajaSusan on October 23, 2010, 12:06:03 pm
Thank You, Susan,
Yowbarb

Natural Herbal Remedies
http://www.manataka.org
...
For thousands of years this sacred site was known as Ma-na-ta-ka® (Place of Peace). Elders of many nations from the four corners of Turtle Island made long pilgrimages to this magnificent place to perform ceremonies and share the gift of the curative waters called No-wa-sa-lon (Breath of Healing). They received other special gifts like healing stones, healing clay and healing herbs to enhance their journey through life.

Read the fascinating and true saga of Manataka® and see how hundreds of tribes, Spanish Conquistadors, two American Presidents, Mayan and Lakota spiritual leaders, and the Rainbow Woman all played a role in the exciting "Story of Manataka".

The Manataka America Indian Council® exists to preserve and protect this sacred place. Welcome to our village! Please come into our lodge and enjoy the gifts we have for you

http://www.manataka.org/Contents%20Page.html   Manataka Feature Index

...

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #20 on: November 19, 2010, 07:08:03 AM »
I started a New Topic:  Native American guidance for the coming times,               
                                     http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php/topic,1311.0.html
The Hopi Spiritual Survival Ark is also being posted  in this Native American Topic.

– Yowbarb
...    
http://www.disclose.tv/forum/the-hopi-spiritual-ark-survival-guide-t7514.html
    
Disclose TV forum, The Hopi Spiritual Ark Survival Guide

Native American Spirituality
THE HOPI SPIRITUAL ARK

Teachings that will protect us during the coming times...
The prophecies, instructions and warnings given to us over 1,100 years ago by

Maasaw can be viewed as a "Spiritual Ark" in these troubling times. The
Spiritual Ark that consists of carefully chosen thoughts, words, deeds and
promises. The sharing and existence of this Ark, is what makes the giving of the
prophecies understandable, and elevates the Hopi prophecies to equal, or
possibly superior, standing with the rest of the prophetic field of information
at this time.

Maasaw told the Hopi to be alert and watchful, and he named specific things they
should do to protect themselves. As we consider these wise specifics, we will
see that they are cautions that we should exercise too.

Make Careful Choices:"

Make careful Choices: When new opportunities are introduced and new advantages
come, be cautious and accept the least harmful things. Choose which path you
will follow -- the materialistic way or the Creator's way. Do not get careless
as time passes and forget your vows to the Creator and the spiritual laws. If
you do, it will be a sign you have forsaken the Great Creator."

Avoid Temptation:

Do not be tempted into anything that will harm your way of life, get you into
trouble, or produce problems. Even though temptation is evil, desire is strong
within us and hard to control. As we pass into the worlds of different ideas,
temptation will weaken us. Avoiding temptation is a key to survival. If you
cannot escape new changes, use them wisely. Don't let them destroy the valuable
elements in your life."

Avoid Pitfalls:

We often step into these very traps because we think they will improve our
lives. On the contrary, they can drain our mind and strength. Deceit is common
among world leaders. Advantageous lifestyles often lead us astray. Modern
concepts will not help balance the natural order on earth and in the universe.

Listen To Your Elders:

Listen to your elders, and you will learn that Divine laws and religion are
important. At one time Hopi learned wisdom, knowledge, and prophecy through
their elders in order to live wisely. It is a pity in these changing times, that
they hear no more, see nor more, nor do they understand. Yet these wise
teachings are the key to happiness and health.

Be Self-Sufficient:

Be Self-sufficient so that you are not dependent upon others for survival. Don't
rely on supermarkets for food and don't be entirely dependent on wages. What
will happen to you if some day the White man's world collapses?

Prepare In Advance:

Take time to review what has happened to you and try to predict what might
happen during the coming year. Once you have done this, ask yourself how you
will handle each thing that does occur. The ancient Native Americans followed a
ritual calendar that forced them to think ahead and prepare in advance, so that
they would not be caught unprepared. Pray for guidance to the Creator, Maasaw,
Mother Earth, and other helper deities.

Use Ancient Teachings As A Guideline:

We look upon our ancient teachings as a guideline used in order to avoid a
downfall for our mistakes. We have learned that through our conduct we can
accomplish good and bad deeds. The old ones say that we have gone through at
least three world catastrophes and each world was destroyed by the same error in
man.

Protect The Laws Of Nature And Spirit. Respect All Living Things:

We must carry on our purpose to protect the laws of nature and spirit which is
our highest priority. Other think that what they're doing is harmless. We think
they are destroying the link between Nature and Man. The signs of warning are
evident in many parts of the world. We all are to be blamed, for we are abusing
our Mother Earth by our mindless actions and by our irresistible urge to better
our way through our own inventive thinking. We have forsaken the warnings of our
ancient fathers, gradually leading ourselves to ruin. We all should hang our
heads in shame.
What we say will pain most people, but we hope it will help them to understand
themselves and reverse their ways toward better behavior for the good of lesser
man and for the survival of our world for the coming generations. We have
learned and believe that one cannot communicate with Nature unless your
existence and behavior are in harmony with the will of the Great Spirit, that he
who knows his heart will also find his way in the future.

Don't Try To Control Others:

Trading blame drains our planet of spiritual energy and causes great harm to all
land and life. Don't try to control others. The spirit dwells within all of us.

Be Satisfied With The Pattern Of Life Given To Us By Our Great Creator:

Be satisfied with the order of our Great Creator, whose light does not blind us
and does not lead us into confusion. Instead, His light brightens the road, so
that we can absorb its great wisdom and live like humans... Perhaps there is
still time for this land to live on under the laws of our Great Spirit and our
Great Creator. These are the things we desire. We are very sad for our life of
today; it is heading down the direction you have created for us.

The tide is gathering, and the high tide which sweeps us away may not be far off.
Our prophecies foretell that times will come when we will periodically recover
our senses and find that some vital element is amiss. Then we will retrace our
steps with fear, not bearing to look back and where we have been. So we will go
forward, backward, forward and backward, our decisions uncertain. This is
happening today in Hopi land, as it is happening in the rest of the world.
So time passes on, and the prophecies of our ancient people begin to unfold.

Many great events lie before us, and we are witnessing with astonishment today
the fact that our ancient's words were right. Live long, for there are great and
exciting adventures awaiting us.

© Reproductions Permitted


HOPI SURVIVAL GUIDE

Blend With The Land And Celebrate Life

Only through peace is the survival of mankind and our planet Earth possible...
At time's end ... there will be a new dawn of time when the world will bloom
into peacefulness.

1. As you board the Ark, make your own Covenant with the Creator and Maasaw.

That does not mean you will exchange what you are going to do on the Ark for
your own religious faith. While the Ark does function in a relationship with the
Creator, it is not a place of specific religion, nor does it recognize any
religion as superior to others. You do not even need to have a specific
religion, believing in a Divine Creator is enough! This message now is not about
eternal matters, or the afterlife, it is about one thing, SURVIVAL.

2. Live simply, as Maasaw himself lives and don't let materialism control your
life.


3. Practice self-denial.

4. Practice self-sufficiency.

Each of us should possess whatever margin of
preparation we need to get us over humps that may last for long periods of time.
We who live in cities must ask ourselves what we would do if all of our food
supply sources closed down tomorrow. Practicing this is something the
Traditionalist Hopi do as a natural way of life, and it is one of the strategies
that has enabled them to endure for thousands of years. Having learned from long
experience that circumstances can change drastically from one year to the next,
they lay aside enough food each Fall to get them through the next year. If the
worse happens, they are ready. We too are advised to stock our shelves with
enough non-perishable foods to sustain our families when the prophesied emergencies strike.

5. Change your priorities. Make careful choices.

6. Recognize that it is the Creator's wish to rescue us, and that together with
the Hopi we can rescue the world.


7. Think of attitude as being an equal partner of application. What you think
about what you do may be even more important than what you do.


8. Make your attitude regarding life and the environment a reverent one.

9. Throughout the Ceremonial Cycle there will be dancing in the Ark.
This pursuit we are following has a serious nature, but we know it will be
successful. This awareness keeps us in a state of joy and fulfillment.

10. During the first part of December say prayers for the well being of the
entire world.

What is being done during this season is to prepare the atmosphere
for the coming year. During this period, you will be blending with the world,
and your consciousness of this state will enfold you and affect everything else
you do during the coming year. If people all over the
world are doing this, think of what the effect will be.

11. On December 21, do initiations to bring others aboard the Spiritual Ark:
 http://www.thehopiway.com/content/spiriir_ark.htm

© Reproductions Permitted
http://www.thehopiway.com/content/proph ... rvival.htm

http://www.thehopiway.com/?404=Y    The Hopi Way

...

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #21 on: November 19, 2010, 08:47:14 AM »

Grand Entry 2010 United Tribes Powwow! Saturday Afternoon   15:00
SiouxSavage
September 14, 2010 | Grand Entry 2010 United Tribes Powwow Saturday Afternoon

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SqOEYyELDQ4


...
Native American POW WOW's coolmerc3      11:15

August 21, 2010 | 1 likes, 0 dislikes
Pictures of Native Americans Celebrating their Culture and Legacy

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cxt1wA5MjV0

...



Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #22 on: November 19, 2010, 08:54:53 AM »
The Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa are an Ojibwa Native American tribe, with an Indian reservation lying
mostly in the Town of Lac du Flambeau in south-western Vilas County, and in the Town of Sherman in south-eastern Iron County
in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. ....Lac du Flambeau Indian Reservation....
Located at Waaswaagani-zaaga'igan and translated into French as Lac du Flambeau (Torch Lake...)
The Reservation of the Lac du Flambeau Band, called Waaswaaganing in Ojibwe, was established under the Treaty of 1854.
...2000 census resident population of 2,995 persons...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lac_du_Flambeau_Band_of_Lake_Superior_Chippewa
...
What wonderful, exuberant energy in this Pow Wow video.  Short but sweet.
I hope these people will be OK in the coming times. - Yowbarb


Bear River Pow Wow, Lac du Flambeau WI (7/9/10)    0:39

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XqphlJnwoTc

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia  Lac du Flambeau Band of Lake Superior Chippewa

« Last Edit: November 19, 2010, 09:06:07 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #23 on: November 22, 2010, 10:35:34 AM »
Indian Taco mydneuknat   0:21

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fmHWawSiTQs

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #24 on: November 22, 2010, 02:54:43 PM »
Girl's Rite of Passage National Geographic

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5B3Abpv0ysM

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #25 on: December 30, 2010, 10:40:33 AM »
Published on Daily Yonder (http://www.dailyyonder.com)
http://www.dailyyonder.com/print/3004
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

First, Always, Hold on to the Land

Image: Lakota elder Leola One Feather:

 

The need for better housing is dire for some Native Americans, but for many people, like Leola One Feather, keeping ownership of long-contested land remains the first priority.

by Nat Kramer

Lakota elder Leola One Feather stands on the future site of her eco-dome house near Wounded Knee on the Pine Ridge Reservation. Although too late in the season to make much progress now, she hopes to complete the house by next winter.

In June 1980, the U.S. Supreme Court awarded the Lakota Nation $106 million for 7.3 million acres surrounding the sacred Black Hills.

The Lakotas refused the money, saying, “The land is not for sale.”

Through decades of often violent confrontation that reopened vast tracts to non-Indian settlers for pennies on the dollar and forced the tribes onto reservations, the Lakota case would have been the largest settlement for lands taken by the U.S. government. Despite the Court’s decision, which still stands, the people of Rosebud, Pine Ridge and other Lakota communities have seen neither money nor land returned. Instead, the land is divided, as are the people.

Leola One Feather’s relatives were among those who chose the land and the future ostensibly guaranteed by treaties. She is now trying to create that future by building a home for her family from the hard soil. The past is ever present to her.

“I think if my grandfather was here, I think he’d be real proud of me because I speak the language, and I live on this land; but I really feel that’s the strength of being who I am, and nobody can tell me different because they made me really strong – those historical facts: how hard our people fought to keep their land.”
 
It’s important to her that she build this house on her own without funds from Housing and Urban Development or other federal aid.  Experience has taught her that those kinds of houses come with their own price and no guarantee of a better life.

“They put us in the same kind of blueprint houses in a cluster with a little-bitty yard. We’re almost Americans because they do that to us, but we’re not,” she explained. “When we’ve had presidents come here, like when President Clinton came to Pine Ridge, [HUD] just refurbished all those houses on the outside so they looked all right. They looked all spic-and-span, but on the inside, that’s another story.”

Jamie Folsom 
For those who want to live on their own land, used and often dilapidated mobile homes have been one of the few affordable options.



Instead, One Feather lives in a used trailer on family lands away from central tribal housing in Wounded Knee. The trailer becomes less livable each year, and it’s clearly past time for a change. “They’re very hard to heat, and the floors are so cold and drafty that you have to have multiple layers of clothes on to survive here,” she said. “It would actually be easier for us at this point to live in a tent.”

One Feather spent much of her childhood in a tent, after the family cabin gave way to weather and regular shifts in the earth, a common issue in the fault zone of the western Dakotas.

Now she is ready to put in sweat equity and materials on a self-sustaining earthen house – an eco-dome – with help from Colorado-based nonprofit Tiospaye-Winyan Maka [3]. One Feather will be using some of the wood from the homestead, which hides among sunflowers and old appliances next to her trailer. It’s more of a practical consideration than sentimental, as aged wood is not easy to come by in a community that lies 100 miles from the nearest supply store.

The short building season is quickly giving way to the icy winds of another Dakota winter in her threadbare trailer. But she’s using the time to put her thoughts toward the future.

“What I always imagine, in my earth house, that one day I’m going to sit in a circle with all my kids and all my grandchildren, and I’m going to have a ceremony, and I’m going to thank God that I have land that my grandparents gave me.”

Jamie Folsom is an independent, multimedia journalist who covers rural life, science and First Nations issues. Videographer Nat Kramer contributed to this series. They are currently developing a set of in-depth multimedia stories on eco-housing projects in Indian Country. Contact for syndication: JamieFNews@yahoo.com.

The need for better housing is dire for some Native Americans, but for many people, like Leola One Feather, keeping ownership of long-contested land remains the first priority.

By Jamie Folsom

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #26 on: January 10, 2011, 11:05:09 AM »
http://www.powwows.com/

Your Portal to Native American Tribal CulturePow Wow is the Native American people’s way of meeting together, to join in dancing, singing, visiting, renewing old friendships and make new ones. This is a time to renew the culture and preserve a rich heritage of American Indians.
Welcome to PowWows.com, your portal to this rich culture. PowWows.com feature information and resources that allow you to explore the Native American life, culture and history.
What is a Native American Pow Wow?
Directory of American Indian Tribes
List of Native American Colleges
Native American Jobs
Research Native American Information

...
New Year `s Eve Pow Wow 2011, Albany NY   5:43     291 views 
kalitanata

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gmbR0Xh2wOc

Pow wow display 2010-2011    1:21    136 Views
IamMohawk
IamMohawk | January 02, 2011 | Just a quick look at my display at our pow wow at the Crown Plaza in Albany NY New Years Eve celebration. Healing winds has brought our people together at this great event and as always I thank you!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-7p0xbH-12Y

Nespelem New Years Powwow 2010-2011, Grand Entry
PowwowTime | January 03, 2011 | Nespelem New Years Powwow. Grand Entry. Visit www.powwowtime.com for powwow calendar, forum, gallery, business directory and more!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eiD88T69W9w

Yowbarb Note: Turn the volume way down before U click on this video! Loud.   ;D

Red Lake New year pow wow 2010-2011 womens special  3:00
SchleyFam1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GmlvlK_Hv30

Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #27 on: January 10, 2011, 11:24:49 AM »
Some New Year's Eve Pow Wows.

Almost Midnight 49 at Tulsa NYE 2010.MOV    2:53
ab49queen

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b0HXNmYZQVI


Copan Powwow 2010 11     8:00
robbpaul2

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGaCrIx__zw

Yowbarb Note:  This Pow Wow was in Alabama. I think Blakeland is near Littleton, Colorado.
Not sure yet...


BLAKELAND NEW YEARS EVE POW-WOW 2010.wmv   2:47
SHERRICK63
January 01, 2011 | NEW YEARS EVE POW-WOW 2010 POARCH,AL
BLAKELAND WINS 2ND PLACE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7cA49R0_DqM

...




Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #28 on: January 10, 2011, 04:39:23 PM »
http://www.awarenessmag.com/julaug08/ja08_for_native_americans.htm

For Native Americans ...
Domes Blend Their Ancestral Past with the Modern World
By Carol Lanham

Deep in the Grand Canyon, in a remote area accessible only on foot, by horseback or by helicopter, a dream is taking shape among members of the Havasupai tribe who inhabit the land. It is a dream for a better way of life, in harmony with their ancestral past yet in step with the realities of the modern world.

It is a dream that began with Uqualla, a Havasupai tribal chief and medicine man, but soon came to involve others throughout the United States. The dream has a name — the Jeva Project — and a purpose —  to bring round, sustainable housing not only to the Havasu Canyon but to other Native American communities as well.

The Jeva Project, named for the Havasupai word for healing, involves building Monolithic Domes to replace aging and cramped housing on native lands. Made of steel-reinforced, insulated concrete, the domes offer a number of advantages over traditional buildings.

“The true ceremonial shape is the round circle, symbolic of Mother Earth, Father Sun, Sister Moon, and one’s life circle,” says Uqualla, who not only is spearheading the Jeva Project but also travels the world in his work as a medicine man. “Our ancestors knew this as evidenced by their round floor plans that were continuous with no beginning or end.”

The dome homes offer practical advantages as well. Due to the materials used in their construction, they are permanent structures designed to last for centuries and offer protection against severe weather. They also are energy efficient, costing 50 percent less to heat and cool than traditional buildings of the same size.
Perhaps most importantly for Native Americans in remote areas, locals can be easily trained to build the domes and most of the construction materials can be dropped in by helicopter if necessary, making them a cost-effective alternative to traditional housing.

“The hope is by showcasing several of these dwellings in the beauty of the Havasu Canyon area, other tribal nations could see the benefits of this housing technology that incorporates the original dwelling concept of the ancients for use in the modern world,” according to the mission statement posted on the project’s website.

Rick Crandall, a Mesa-based architect who designed the five domes that will be constructed in the Jeva Project’s first phase, says the buildings are in keeping with the traditions of several Native American tribes. “Many of the Arizona and New Mexico tribes consider circles to be a sacred shape, and this is especially true of Pueblo, Tewa, Anastasi, Hopi and Navajo tribes.

Round buildings aren’t new and indeed were part of the basic culture of the American Plains natives going back for many centuries,” he says. “It was only when the westward expansion began in the 1840s that square buildings were introduced to these tribes and all of the square buildings were constructed for them.”

Monolithic Domes planned for the Havasu Canyon would not be the first to be built for Native Americans. Several dome schools have been built on Indian reservations throughout the state of Arizona, as well as in New Mexico and South Dakota. In Oklahoma, plans are currently under way for a multipurpose Monolithic Dome building to be used by the Muskogee Indians.

Monolithic Domes were invented in 1978 by three Idaho natives who believed that nature’s perfect shape offered a better way to build. David B. South had become fascinated with domes after hearing a lecture on geodesic domes by their inventor, Buckminster Fuller.

But South thought he could build a dome more efficiently. After much experimentation, he and his brothers, Barry and Randy, came up with a way to build a one-piece, concrete structure that today is known as a Monolithic Dome.

The building process begins with the placement of a ringbeam footing and the pouring of a circular steel-reinforced concrete slab floor. An Airform, a tarp made of tough, single-ply roofing material, is then attached to the ring base and inflated. Once the Airform is inflated, work moves to the interior where three inches of polyurethane foam is sprayed on the structure.

A grid of steel rebar is then placed into the foam and later embedded in Shotcrete that ranges from 4 inches at the top to 8 inches at the base. This process creates a safe, permanent and energy-efficient structure.

In the three decades since their invention, Monolithic Domes have been built all over the United States and around the world. They are being used as homes, schools, churches, storage facilities, gymnasiums and performing arts centers. The Navajo Nation was the first Native American tribe to build a Monolithic Dome.

In 1996, a school district on a Navajo reservation in Arizona commissioned Crandall to design two Monolithic Dome school buildings largely because of the relatively low construction costs and energy efficiency, but also because the buildings’ shape would be in keeping with the tribe’s sacred traditions.

Leupp School, with students in grades kindergarten through 12, completed its Monolithic Dome library and parent center in August 1997. The building, located in Leupp, Arizona, is also available to the community for town meetings and social get-togethers.

In nearby Birdsprings, Little Singer Community School completed a multipurpose dome building a few months later. The dome includes a gym, complete with a basketball court and jogging track, as well as classrooms.

To make the building compatible with sacred traditions, four entrances were incorporated into the dome, one for each direction. In addition, each entrance features three designs symbolizing the full circle of life. That totals 12 — an important number in Navaho cosmology.

Ron White, who was assistant superintendent of Tolchii Kooh Charter Schools, which was in charge of building both schools, said the domes have met expectations for durability and energy efficiency. But he pointed out that the idea initially met with some resistance simply because the domes were so different from the traditional buildings that were part of the modern-day reservation. “We learned that trying to make changes in the building mindset is difficult to do,” he says.

School officials in Whiteriver, Arizona also encountered some skepticism when they recommended construction of a Monolithic Dome elementary school on the Apache Reservation. Although the Apaches traditionally built wickiups — wood and grass structures shaped like a tepee with a smoke hole at the top — they now live in traditional, square buildings.

By making the dome designs and plans available to the community, providing tribal members with information, and welcoming spectators at the construction site, the doubts were soon eliminated. In 1998, the three domes that make up Cradleboard Elementary opened to rave reviews.

Soon, there will be Monolithic Dome homes on a reservation as well. The first dome housing community is slated for completion this summer on the Navajo Reservation in Taloni Lake, Arizona.
Built by Dome Technology of Idaho, 36 concrete dome shells are completed, but work still needs to be done on the interiors of these new homes. “It is believed that with reasonable care, these buildings will stand long after other housing projects have gone the way of the world,” White says.

Meanwhile, construction on homes for the Havasupai tribe has been temporarily delayed due to the unexpected death in April of Archie Eschborn, who along with Uqualla, was spearheading plans for the Jeva Project. It was Eschborn who first came up with the idea for building Monolithic Domes in the Havasu Canyon after getting to know Mason Rumney, a long-time dome owner in Sedona.

Upon meeting Uqualla, Eschborn realized they both had a similar vision for the Havasupai tribe and they became actively involved in securing financing necessary to make their dream a reality.
Before his death, Eschborn was working with several U.S government organizations, including the Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Department of the Interior, among others.

Eschborn’s widow, Linnea, along with Uqualla, Crandall and Rumney remain committed to making the project a reality. Uqualla, who teaches globally, is already making plans to host medicine meetings in the Jeva Project’s ceremonial complex once it is completed.

“I know that the Jeva Project is now up to me, and Archie’s wife, Linnea. We’ve been given the talking stick, and take the responsibility of carrying the project through. My hope is to have the Havasupai tribe be the leading force in the return to tribal traditions.”

For more information on the Jeva Project, visit www.jevaproject.com. For more information about Monolithic Domes, please visit www.monolithic.com, www.uqualla.com, or call Mason Rumney at (928) 300-7352.

 


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Yowbarb

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Re: Native American survivor stories, tales, future?
« Reply #29 on: January 11, 2011, 11:31:37 AM »
I just started reading this book called, Now is the Hour, written by a Native American, (can't remember her name), but it seems to be very cool and even has a section about how much stuff to have stocked up, and other survival tips.  I think it will be a great asset to have.

That sounds great! I will take a look at it.  ;)
Yowbarb