Author Topic: super-nova cover story for two suns  (Read 4434 times)

Wolf

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super-nova cover story for two suns
« on: January 21, 2011, 06:51:29 PM »
Guys the cover story for two suns has arrived

 ???


Earth could be getting a second sun, at least temporarily.

Dr. Brad Carter, Senior Lecturer of Physics at the University of Southern Queensland, outlined the scenario to news.com.au. Betelgeuse, one of the night sky's brightest stars, is losing mass, indicating it is collapsing. It could run out of fuel and go super-nova at any time.

When that happens, for at least a few weeks, we'd see a second sun, Carter says. There may also be no night during that timeframe.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/01/20/two-suns-twin-stars_n_811864.html

The link above leads to an article entitled: Two Suns? Twin Stars Could Be Visible From Earth By 2012. How long it takes light to travel does not seem to concern Dr. Brad Carter. I was thinking if we see a second sun the powers that be might use a ploy like a super nova to cover up the fact that it is planet x.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2011, 06:38:28 PM by Wolf »

_cj_

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Re: super-nova cover story for two suns
« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2011, 02:24:58 AM »
welcome to the forum wolf

it cant be a cover story because you can see Betelgeuse with the naked eye - it would very easy to see if Betelgeuse was still there or not
if planet x is approaching with a high angle of inclination the ecliptic it would move accross the sky in a different pattern to star precession.

the only way it could be a cover story would be if it was prroaching directly from the direction of orion, in which case the glare of planet x would obscure this region of stars

anyway - still a wonderful thing to witness - who would have thought that we might get to see a supanova in our life time

regards,

alex

ASEEKERTOO

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Re: super-nova cover story for two suns
« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2011, 06:59:22 AM »
from what i can gather; if Betelgeuse went supernova tomorrow; it would take 422 years for us to know about it.
It takes light 3.7 milion years to get to us from the star. There are 8,760 hours in a year.....
However, if we see a second sun tomorrow then it happened 422 years ago :)....

http://stars.astro.illinois.edu/sow/betelgeuse.html

Interestingly, Betelgeuse is considered a runaway star. And was born only about 10 million years ago.

""The star's motion shows it to be a runaway member of the Orion OB1 association, particularly the subgroup that involves the stars up and to the right of the Belt. ""

If I had lived 422 years ago [or anytime after] and an 'entity' told me that a star exploded, I could have been known as a really good
prophet or foreteller of the future had I written down the information as a prediction.

The last supernova in our galaxy, the milky way was in 1604. [That we know about and could see ]
http://www.space.com/412-supernova-400-year-explosion-imaged.html

 
Ancient Prophecy appears to be fulfilled in the Nightly News.

Jimfarmer

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Re: super-nova cover story for two suns
« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2011, 07:16:04 AM »
"if Betelgeuse went supernova tomorrow; it would take 422 years for us to know about it.
It takes light 3.7 milion years to get to us from the star"
Something not right.  A light-year is the distance that light travels in one year.

From your reference of http://stars.astro.illinois.edu/sow/betelgeuse.html:
"Direct parallax measures from space, using the most modern results, give 495 light years, whereas the parallax using the star's natural radio emission gives 640 light years."

So, it would take light from Betelgeuse between 495 and 640 years to reach Earth.

_cj_

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Re: super-nova cover story for two suns
« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2011, 07:21:04 AM »
i think you are right jim - i seem to recall it was approx 600 years - but i havent looked it up so i might be wrong

augonit

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Re: super-nova cover story for two suns
« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2011, 07:50:09 AM »
I think it would be cool to see that.

ASEEKERTOO

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Re: super-nova cover story for two suns
« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2011, 07:51:11 AM »
"The star's distance is a problem and a puzzle (true for all the other parameters as well). Direct parallax measures from space, using the most modern results, give 495 light years, whereas the parallax using the star's natural radio emission gives 640 light years. At a compromise distance of 570 light years"
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
10-4. I just knew someone would call me on that lol. Since I saw that nobody really knows with certainty how far away it is that I could
get away with using a different source than what was quoted in my cited website. A DIFFERENT distance figure was gained from this
website :
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_many_hours_does_it_take_the_light_from_Betelgeuse_to_reach_earth

and I used it instead. I knew when I posted those figures that there was a likelyhood of being called on it.... The figure I used
for computation was 430 light years; not the 495 to 640 quoted in the main article. Since no one seems to know how far it is I
accepted a range of 430 to 640 as viable. Good Catch !!!!!    [ oh, and if it still proves out that my math is off then just know that math
was not my strong suit as I was too busy saying ' How YOU doin ' to the girls in school]

« Last Edit: January 22, 2011, 07:52:45 AM by ASEEKERTOO »
Ancient Prophecy appears to be fulfilled in the Nightly News.