Author Topic: Post here information on obtaining and storing water for future survival  (Read 12915 times)

TheSwordOfDemocles

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Personally I would prefer this product or similar http://www.theoutdoorshop.com/showPart.asp?part=PN31003

It has a number of advantages over a solar still:
(i) Portable, can be used anywhere.
(ii) Filters can be cleaned and or replaced easily.
(iii) Not dependant on sunshine, in a disaster sunshine might be in a short supply. (think nuclear winter, multiple volcanic eruptions etc)
(iv) If you need to bug out quickly just throw it in a ruck sack. Water is more important than food in the short term.

The important thing to remember is where you live, the further north you are (above the equator) the less sunshine you will get and in the winter months,  solar energy can drop by up to 90% form 1000 watts per Sq metre to less than a 100 Watts per sq metre. These figures based on the latitude of the UK.

I think it is important to think of all the possibilities and probabilities when choosing equipment.

Charlie

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Personally I would prefer this product or similar http://www.theoutdoorshop.com/showPart.asp?part=PN31003


Have a couple of those but they won't cook eggs worth a darn ;D

Yowbarb

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Members please share your ideas, thoughts and references on water.
Barb Townsend
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Endtimesgal_2012

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Storing water
« Reply #18 on: November 02, 2013, 09:24:42 AM »
Everyone knows that water storage is a primary objective for a prepper. There are many different ways to store water.  Some people purchase cases of bottled water, some people clean out empty milk jugs, some use empty liter bottles of coke.  I think if one has the room to place them, using 55 gallon blue containers is the way to go.

Here is a link to show what I am talking about.  This one is pretty expensive, but I know that if you search locally you can usually find a source to purchase containers like these used.  Many were used to store food grade products and simply need to be cleaned prior to using.  My daughter has several of these and only paid $15 a piece.  She had to clean them before using and then she added 1/2 cup of bleach once they were filled.  A year later they tested them and the water was still fresh.  She does empty them once a year and refills them.  I think this is the best way to go for storing water.


http://www.arizonabarrels.com/55_gallon_closed_top_blue_plastic_barrels_drums.html

I tried to post the website pictures but for some reason it would not let me.


 
   



 
   



 



bk

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Re: Storing water
« Reply #19 on: November 02, 2013, 05:17:32 PM »
Great price @ only $25  :o

Thanks for the post.

I have some of the 2.5 & 5 gallon size from working in the food service area that I use.

I also saved 5 gallon sanitizer (bleach) buckets from work and after rinsing the out use then to store water for non-potable needs.

Endtimesgal_2012

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Re: Storing water
« Reply #20 on: November 03, 2013, 07:42:53 AM »
What a great idea!  And water stored in other less safe containers will still be needed for cleaning, washing, etc. and saves the precious drinking water.

Yowbarb

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Re: Post here information on obtaining and storing water for future survival
« Reply #21 on: January 09, 2014, 02:46:41 PM »
This is an article about storing emergency water in soda bottles...

http://www.endtimesreport.com/storing_tap_water.html
...

bk

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Re: Post here information on obtaining and storing water for future survival
« Reply #22 on: January 14, 2014, 11:22:14 PM »
Very good info Barb

bk

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Re: Post here information on obtaining and storing water for future survival
« Reply #23 on: January 16, 2014, 07:25:17 AM »
Another piece of info.

Water and Hydration:
Hidden water sources, tools for preppers, and storage ideas

Preppers live by this fact: a person can live a month without food, but only a few days
without water. And while pollution or disruption of the water supply is entirely
possible, most preppers fail to stock enough water.  They'll need water not only for
drinking, but for cooking and cleaning as well.

Seven Lessons About Water for Survival
Take heed of these lessons about your water supply for emergency preparedness
(because the time to build a well is not when you're thirsty)


http://www.happypreppers.com/water.html

Jimfarmer

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From http://2012thebigpicture.wordpress.com/2014/06/18/this-tower-pulls-drinking-water-out-of-thin-air/ :

"This Tower Pulls Drinking Water Out of Thin Air "



[start extract]
The invention from Arturo Vittori, an industrial designer, and his colleague Andreas Vogler doesn’t involve complicated gadgetry or feats of engineering, but instead relies on basic elements like shape and material and the ways in which they work together.

At first glance, the 30-foot-tall, vase-shaped towers, named after a fig tree native to Ethiopia, have the look and feel of a showy art installation. But every detail, from carefully-placed curves to unique materials, has a functional purpose.

The rigid outer housing of each tower is comprised of lightweight and elastic juncus stalks, woven in a pattern that offers stability in the face of strong wind gusts while still allowing air to flow through. A mesh net made of nylon or  polypropylene, which calls to mind a large Chinese lantern, hangs inside, collecting droplets of dew that form along the surface. As cold air condenses, the droplets roll down into a container at the bottom of the tower. The water in the container then passes through a tube that functions as a faucet, carrying the water to those waiting on the ground.

Using mesh to facilitate clean drinking water isn’t an entirely new concept. A few years back, an MIT student designed a fog-harvesting device with the material. But Vittori’s invention yields more water, at a lower cost, than some other concepts that came before it.
[end extract]

25 gallons per day in some locations, depending on temperature difference from nightfall to dawn.  Cost of about $5oo per tower.

steedy

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I've been storing water in half gallon milk jugs.  But this water is for things like hygiene purposes.  I think when people think of storing water, they don't think about the need for hygiene and cooking water as well as drinking water. 

Yowbarb

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From http://2012thebigpicture.wordpress.com/2014/06/18/this-tower-pulls-drinking-water-out-of-thin-air/ :

"This Tower Pulls Drinking Water Out of Thin Air "



[start extract]
The invention from Arturo Vittori, an industrial designer, and his colleague Andreas Vogler doesn’t involve complicated gadgetry or feats of engineering, but instead relies on basic elements like shape and material and the ways in which they work together.

At first glance, the 30-foot-tall, vase-shaped towers, named after a fig tree native to Ethiopia, have the look and feel of a showy art installation. But every detail, from carefully-placed curves to unique materials, has a functional purpose.

The rigid outer housing of each tower is comprised of lightweight and elastic juncus stalks, woven in a pattern that offers stability in the face of strong wind gusts while still allowing air to flow through. A mesh net made of nylon or  polypropylene, which calls to mind a large Chinese lantern, hangs inside, collecting droplets of dew that form along the surface. As cold air condenses, the droplets roll down into a container at the bottom of the tower. The water in the container then passes through a tube that functions as a faucet, carrying the water to those waiting on the ground.

Using mesh to facilitate clean drinking water isn’t an entirely new concept. A few years back, an MIT student designed a fog-harvesting device with the material. But Vittori’s invention yields more water, at a lower cost, than some other concepts that came before it.
[end extract]

25 gallons per day in some locations, depending on temperature difference from nightfall to dawn.  Cost of about $5oo per tower.

Wow Jim, thanks for your post. What a beautiful, wonderful invention!

Yowbarb

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I've been storing water in half gallon milk jugs.  But this water is for things like hygiene purposes.  I think when people think of storing water, they don't think about the need for hygiene and cooking water as well as drinking water.
...
steedy, you are probably right - a lot of people don't realize they will need a lot of water for hygiene.
Gallon water jugs would be good too, rinsing them out with a few drop of chlorine bleach.
Water storage instructions here, some excerpts: US govt. pdf

http://www.emd.wa.gov/preparedness/documents/piy_water.pdf

1. Choose containers that have a tight-fitting
screw-cap lid. Two-liter pop bottles are a great
choice.
2. Thoroughly rinse out the container
and the lid with water, and fill it to
the very top of the container. For
extra safety, thoroughly rinse the
container with a weak solution of
liquid chlorine bleach (8-10 drops in
two cups water). Empty this solution
out and fill the container right to the
top with fresh water.
3. Seal the container tightly.
4. Label it “drinking water” and date it.
5. Store it in a cool, dark place. Examples:
• under the bed
• in the corner of closets
• behind the sofa
Hint: To make it easy to find many places to
put your water, think about this activity as a
priority rather than an inconvenience.
[continues]

Yowbarb

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Another piece of info.

Water and Hydration:
Hidden water sources, tools for preppers, and storage ideas

Preppers live by this fact: a person can live a month without food, but only a few days
without water. And while pollution or disruption of the water supply is entirely
possible, most preppers fail to stock enough water.  They'll need water not only for
drinking, but for cooking and cleaning as well.

Seven Lessons About Water for Survival
Take heed of these lessons about your water supply for emergency preparedness
(because the time to build a well is not when you're thirsty)


http://www.happypreppers.com/water.html

bk this is great info to have.
Thanks,  :)
Yowbarb

bk

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If you ever find yourself without a clean water source grab a piece of cloth and 2 containers. Put the dirty water in one container and run the cloth from it to the empty glass. After a short while you will have filtered, muck free water. Remember to boil..