Author Topic: Canning!  (Read 19280 times)

Montanabarb

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Re: Canning!
« Reply #15 on: June 05, 2011, 02:32:28 PM »
Bill Xam's half baked Chicken Soup. This is the recipe that I came up with last year for my chicken soup. You can change the spices as you like. I often will add dry red peppers for some spicy flavor. You'll note that I don't use a lot of the normal spices like Oregano or the like. Noodles can be used instead of rice - just add them in 20 minutes before canning or they'll be mush after canning the soup. Rice is easier - noodles takes a better sense of timing. I had a few pints of this this past week, 11 months after canning the last batch.


The basic ingredients for the soup. You'll note the off brand Chicken broth. And my "special" cooking aid.

Nothing beats nice hot Chicken soup on a winter day or when you're sick.

Here's your recipe. This makes 24 pints, 12 quarts. You'll want to make this in at least a 12 quart soup pot. This is also an involved recipe so read carefully and print it out. Make sure the soup is fully cooked. Rice, beans, etc., need to be fully cooked unless you happen to like 'sploding canning jars in a pressure cooker. Not that I would have ever done that.

    * 1 whole chicken
    * 4 pounds rice (white)
    * 4 Celery bunches
    * 2 lbs Carrots
    * 2 large Onions
    * 1 Tomato
    * 4 Tablespoons Black Pepper
    * 1 Teaspoon Red Pepper
    * 1/2 teaspoon Garlic powder
    * 8 ears Corn
    * 1/4 cup dry Parsley
    * Pinch sugar
    * 1 quart Chicken broth (low sodium is okay)



Roast the Chicken in a 350 degree oven, basting often, covered. Let cool overnight to set. Keep the drippings.

Cook the Corn, also cool overnight.

In a large bowl, dice the Carrots, Celery, Onions, Tomato. Add the rice and Chicken broth. Remove the kernels from the Corn, put in bowl. Mix this thoroughly, let sit for at least 2 hours.

De bone the Chicken, put it in the soup pot. Mix the drippings from the Chicken. Add the mixture from the bowl (after letting sit for 2 hours). Add water to fill the pot, heat to a light boil.

Reduce heat to simmer, stirring often. Once the rice is cooked, add water to fill the pot. Simmer for an additional 1 1/2 hours. You can also allow the soup to cool down and then reheat to blend the flavors more.

While the soup is cooking prepare the canning jars by cleaning either in a dishwasher or by hand. Place in oven set at "warm" to prevent them from shattering when the hot soup is added.

Fill your pressure cooker according to the directions.

Using your food funnel, fill the jars leaving 1/2 inch head space. Process at 11 pounds, 60 minutes for pints, 70 minutes for quarts (you're canning meat, over processing will not hurt anything).

Sounds and looks DELICIOUS!  However, both my husband and I have high blood pressure, so I make my own chicken broth. I buy Costco chickens four at a time.  I remove ALL the fat and skin, save the wings, bone out the breasts and legs and can or freeze, and put the bones and carcass in a big stock pot with a gallon or more of water. Boil until the meat falls off the bones. Cool it, don rubber gloves and remove all the bones from the pot. Refrigerate over night (the fat rises to the surface and hardens.) Skim all the remaining fat off the broth.  Remove some or all of the cooked meat if desired for casseroles, etc.  Boil the broth to reduce by about half.  Can or freeze the broth.  To use, add equal parts of water and boil for five minutes. Add salt substitute (or garlic and herbs are delicious in place of salt.) This makes a couple gallons of broth, so you don't need to do it very often.

noproblemo2

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Re: Canning!
« Reply #16 on: June 07, 2011, 01:00:21 PM »
Here's a link to the canning primer video. I can post an embedded version if anyone has trouble with it or put it on the Facebook page.

http://www.northernmichigansolar.com/TOS_EP4.wmv
Doesn't op for me and I don't use facebook..............

Bane

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Yowbarb

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Re: Canning!
« Reply #18 on: June 08, 2011, 03:22:44 PM »
Here's a link to the canning primer video. I can post an embedded version if anyone has trouble with it or put it on the Facebook page.

http://www.northernmichigansolar.com/TOS_EP4.wmv

Thanks!

Yowbarb

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Re: Canning!
« Reply #19 on: June 14, 2011, 08:19:39 PM »
This particular episode is delivered at a variable bit rate - I'm going to have to re encode it for lower bandwidth. It's a new season and I always fall into the highest quality possible trap. After all it's me wearing sunglasses.  8)

Thanks Billxam!

Linda

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Re: Canning!
« Reply #20 on: June 16, 2011, 05:18:09 PM »
This is a great thread billxam, lots of good info.
Linda :)

It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.

noproblemo2

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Re: Canning!
« Reply #21 on: June 16, 2011, 05:27:37 PM »
And so it begins. This year's canning season has officially started! Gotta get at least another 5 dozen canning jars. That said, if you plan on canning this year, now is the time to get started. Canning jars can be found at a lot of stores for a few months out of the year and this is it so buy them now. People like me (crazy with too much time on their hands) buy them out fast.

My mother volunteers at a food pantry - what they don't give away has to get tossed and on her budget she gets enough food (and so do I) - and the power went out today.

And now I'm the proud owner of 25 pounds of chicken, 20 pounds of green beans and a ton of peppers. So, this weekend we'll be canning meat and green beans.

I'll show up and detail my meat canning procedure which is different than normal in processing time and pressure this Sunday. The way I do it I get a 2 year shelf life.

All of this stuff is mostly leg quarters so it will be a long involved process but I should get at least 12 pints out of them.
GREAT info Thanks, look forward to the details

augonit

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Re: Canning!
« Reply #22 on: June 17, 2011, 06:44:47 AM »
I've been wondering how do you get pectin to make jellies if you can't buy it anymore?  What about pickling stuff?  This year will be the first time I'll pickle stuff (beets and bread and butter pickles), so I've been wondering. 

Yowbarb

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Re: Canning!
« Reply #23 on: June 17, 2011, 07:32:43 AM »
I've been wondering how do you get pectin to make jellies if you can't buy it anymore?  What about pickling stuff?  This year will be the first time I'll pickle stuff (beets and bread and butter pickles), so I've been wondering.

Hi augonit I had no idea peope could make their own pectin. Here is an article on how to do it.  :) In the comments some people suggest do not core the apples...

Mother Earth News
http://www.motherearthnews.com/Real-Food/1980-05-01/Make-Your-Own-Pectin.aspx

MAKE YOUR OWN PECTIN

by JEANNINE ANSLEY

There's just nothing quite like homemade jam. Whether you spread it on toast, serve it with steamin' hot pancakes, or just—as I've been known to do—eat it right off the spoon when nobody's around, this "personal" sweet stuff seems to hang on to a lot more of the "fresh fruit" flavor than the store-bought kind ever does.

 However, regardless of how fresh their fruits or berries, most folks have to use packaged pectin to get their jams (or jellies) to "set".

 What many spread-makers don't know is that the often unreliable commercial pectin isn't necessary. You can whip up a batch of your own "jam jeller" in no time!

 You see, pectin is a natural substance that's found (in one degree or another) in all fruits. Apples and crab apples contain the richest concentrations of the thickener, though, so apples form the base of our recipe:

FRUIT PECTIN

 Wash, but don't peel, about seven large tart apples. Cut them into pieces and add four cups of water and two tablespoons of lemon juice. Boil the mixture for 40 minutes, then strain it through a diaper or cheesecloth. Finally, boil the juice for another 20 minutes, pour it into sterilized jars, and seal them.

BERRY JAM WITH FRUIT PECTIN

 Clean and crush two quarts of ripe berries (you can use a sieve to remove the seeds). Put four cups of the mashed fruit Into a pot, add four cups of honey, and mix the ingredients together well. Then let the sticky liquid stand for about an hour.

 After the sixty minutes are up, stir in one cup of fruit pectin and boil the mixture hard for five minutes (be sure to stir it all the while). Then just remove the jam from the heat, skim the top, and stir the spread until it's cool (about five minutes). Pour the finished spread into sterilized glasses, and seal them with paraffin.
 
HOW TO TEST FRUIT JUICES FOR NATURAL PECTIN
 
Stir one tablespoon of grain alcohol into one teaspoon of fruit juice. You can use wood or denatured alcohol, but—if you do—DON'T TASTE 'EM . . . since wood and denatured alcohol are poisons.
 [1] Juices that are high in natural pectin will form a lot of bulky, gelatinous material.
 [2] Those wish an average pectin content will form a few pieces of the jelly-like substance.
 [3] And juices that are low in pectin content will form only small, flaky pieces of sediment.


Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/Real-Food/1980-05-01/Make-Your-Own-Pectin.aspx#ixzz1PXmMfzbk
.................................

Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/Real-Food/1980-05-01/Make-Your-Own-Pectin.aspx#ixzz1PXm4K7i1

augonit

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Re: Canning!
« Reply #24 on: June 17, 2011, 07:46:47 AM »
Thanks!

Yowbarb

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Re: Canning!
« Reply #25 on: June 17, 2011, 01:33:28 PM »

augonit

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Re: Canning!
« Reply #26 on: June 18, 2011, 03:22:14 PM »
I tried to make black raspberry jelly today, but ended up with black raspberry sauce instead.   :'(   However, hope springs eternal and I will try to do strawberry jelly tomorrow.

augonit

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Re: Canning!
« Reply #27 on: June 18, 2011, 05:56:53 PM »
Bill--why do you say that I'm getting brave?  I've made jelly before.  However, I seem to have trouble with raspberries.

Montanabarb

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Re: Canning!
« Reply #28 on: June 18, 2011, 10:16:29 PM »
Auggie:  You asked about pectin in the aftertime.  Apples have lots of natural pectin that you can extract by processing and use in all flavors of jelly.  Beef, chicken and other animal extracts can be used in place of Knox gelatin for jellied vegetable and meat dishes.  I'm sure there are other sources of pectin but I can't think of it right now.  Good luck.   

bk

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Re: Canning!
« Reply #29 on: June 18, 2011, 11:15:38 PM »
Hope this helps

Apples, guavas, quince, plums, gooseberries, oranges and other citrus fruits, contain large amounts of pectin, while soft fruits like cherries, grapes and strawberries contain small amounts of pectin.
Typical levels of pectin in plants are (fresh weight):
apples, 1–1.5%
apricot, 1%
cherries, 0.4%
oranges 0.5–3.5%
carrots approx. 1.4%
citrus peels, 30%

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pectin#Sources_and_production

How to make

FRUIT PECTIN

Wash, but don't peel, about seven large tart apples. Cut them into pieces and add four cups of water and two tablespoons of lemon juice. Boil the mixture for 40 minutes, then strain it through a diaper or cheesecloth. Finally, boil the juice for another 20 minutes, pour it into sterilized jars, and seal them.

http://www.motherearthnews.com/Real-Food/1980-05-01/Make-Your-Own-Pectin.aspx