Author Topic: Canning!  (Read 19203 times)

Sunnybug

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« Reply #60 on: October 16, 2011, 11:10:57 AM »
Does anyone else remember Choke-cherry jelly?  Chokecherry trees grow wild in the high rocky mountains.  The fruit is very tart, but my mother made nice jelly from it.

Never had the jelly, but choke cherry is what we make lacing pins out of for our lodges.   We cut them in the fall and peel off the tender bark.   We make a decotion or syrup from the bark and use for wet chesty coughs, diarrhea, kidney and bladder stones,

Hey Jim! I had a cousin that made chokecherry jam! The cherry's are tiny and pucker you up but the jam was very good. (Although I live in AZ - we used to spend the summers in Canada when I was a kid...many moons ago...)
Was not aware of the medicinal qualities! Good to know Chaunska!
Never Give UP! EVER

Montanabarb

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Re: Canning!
« Reply #61 on: October 16, 2011, 12:59:15 PM »
Does anyone else remember Choke-cherry jelly?  Chokecherry trees grow wild in the high rocky mountains.  The fruit is very tart, but my mother made nice jelly from it.

In August I picked enough chokecherries out of my yard to make 1 1/2 gallons of juice.  I have a Finnish steam juicer, so the only real work is picking the berries. I just finished eating the first pint of chokecherry jelly (I used old pectin and it was somewhat runny, but delish! (Note to self: USE ONLY NEW PECTIN.)  My chokecherry bushes are watered by our sprinkler system.  They were transplanted to the site nearly seventy years ago.

P.S. I forgot to mention, that I really enjoy leaving part of the harvest for a dozen different species of birds that swarm my yard in the fall.  I have other types of berries, too.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2011, 08:54:39 PM by Montanabarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Canning!
« Reply #62 on: October 17, 2011, 06:31:09 AM »
Does anyone else remember Choke-cherry jelly?  Chokecherry trees grow wild in the high rocky mountains.  The fruit is very tart, but my mother made nice jelly from it.

Never had the jelly, but choke cherry is what we make lacing pins out of for our lodges.   We cut them in the fall and peel off the tender bark.   We make a decotion or syrup from the bark and use for wet chesty coughs, diarrhea, kidney and bladder stones,


Good info to have... Post your healing recipes in one of the topics too...
Site and Image:  Wild Foods Info 
http://www.wildfoods.info/wildfoods/chokecherry.html


enlightenme

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Re: Canning!
« Reply #63 on: February 23, 2013, 04:50:06 PM »
A few good "How To" Canning videos and recipes.  I've been researching quite a bit on processing with a pressure cooker, so I thought I would share some of the videos I have found with you.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TSAHT1W45BY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=saEqDH6_DQQ

Yowbarb

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Re: Canning!
« Reply #64 on: August 12, 2013, 09:16:19 AM »
SHTF & Prepping Central

[ SHTF & Prepping Central Facebook page  https://www.facebook.com/SHTFPreps?hc_location=stream
  Website: http://www.shtfpreparedness.com/ ]


1000+ FREE Canning Recipes

 See here >> http://www.shtfpreparedness.com/1000-free-canning-recipes/

bk

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Re: Canning!
« Reply #65 on: January 17, 2014, 10:22:17 PM »
Here is a link for canning meats.

Canning Meat

Canning meat products.
Remember these things.
Be sure to trim away any gristle, bruised areas or excess fat.
Meat MUST be processed in a pressure canner. The processing times may seem long, but the investment of time now is so worth it in the end.


http://www.simplycanning.com/canning-meat.html

Yowbarb

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Re: Canning!
« Reply #66 on: January 21, 2014, 12:42:33 PM »
Here is a link for canning meats.

Canning Meat

Canning meat products.
Remember these things.
Be sure to trim away any gristle, bruised areas or excess fat.
Meat MUST be processed in a pressure canner. The processing times may seem long, but the investment of time now is so worth it in the end.


http://www.simplycanning.com/canning-meat.html

bk thanks for posting this info!  Good ideas...
I remember when my Mother used to use pressure cookers all the time...
What a great cooking tool. I suppose a person could use one on an outdoor wood stove, too.

steedy

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Re: Canning!
« Reply #67 on: April 18, 2014, 12:57:31 PM »
I'm excited about canning this year because I will have some help with the pressure canning.  I haven't been able to get the timing right for that, so I have a couple old ladies to said they'd help me.

I have canned crackers and flour this year for the first time.  I did that a couple months ago, and I haven't checked on them yet.  It's supposed to last 10 years! I think that would be an excellent way to store these things if you aren't storing them in buckets with Mylar stuff, (which I'm not too up on as you can tell).

Yowbarb

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Re: Canning!
« Reply #68 on: April 18, 2014, 03:29:09 PM »
I'm excited about canning this year because I will have some help with the pressure canning.  I haven't been able to get the timing right for that, so I have a couple old ladies to said they'd help me.

I have canned crackers and flour this year for the first time.  I did that a couple months ago, and I haven't checked on them yet.  It's supposed to last 10 years! I think that would be an excellent way to store these things if you aren't storing them in buckets with Mylar stuff, (which I'm not too up on as you can tell).

That is awesome when you are friends with older people and they can pass on what they have learned... So very important. Up to a certain time period practically every woman knew how to sew,  knit, can, garden...
I never got to learn anything from my Grandma and my Mom was an electronic assembler at RCA - pretty preoccupied with five kids too - she never actually taught me, walked me though anything. Maybe she tried but it didn't stick in me brain.  :)