Author Topic: Magnetic pole shift  (Read 2503 times)

TheSwordOfDemocles

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Magnetic pole shift
« on: June 05, 2011, 12:27:07 AM »
Have a read of this:


Geoscience: “Earth’s Magnetic ‘Poles’ Once at The Equator “

 05 June 2011 02:00:57
 
“Earth’s Magnetic ‘Poles’ Once at The Equator “
 by The Daily Galaxy


 “It has been 780,000 years since the last reversal, so we may be long overdue one. But will lethal radiation from space bombard the Earth, as it drops its protective magnetic shield during the reversal? Italian scientists studying one of the most mysterious natural phenomena say that polarity reversals seem to occur in clusters, indicating some kind of "memory" of previous events. Scientists now say that the Earth's magnetic poles were once near the equator, which could explain puzzling changes in the magnetism of rocks millions of years ago.
 
The Earth's magnetic poles are aligned along roughly the same axis as its rotational poles. Geologists have assumed this was also true in the past, so they use volcanic rocks, which when they formed took on an imprint of the direction and strength of the Earth's magnetic field, to deduce the rocks' original latitude and to trace continental motions over the past billion years, which has created a puzzle for rocks in North America and eastern Europe. In both regions, there appear to be rocks that were at the equator at some points between 550 and 600 million years ago and near the poles for other parts of this time period.
 
There appear to be rocks that moved from the poles to the equator several times in 50 million years, which implies that the ancient continents sped across the surface at more than 45 centimetres a year - twice as fast as the top speed of plate tectonics - and then reversed course at a similarly improbable speeed, which is also too fast to be explained by a phenomenon called true polar wander, in which the Earth's entire crust and mantle reorient, moving a different geographic region to the north pole.
 
Reserach conducted by Alexandra Abrajevitch at Kochi University in Japan and Rob Van der Voo of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor suggested that the magnetic pole itself shifted by 90 degrees, so that it lined up along the equator. The planet's magnetic field is generated by the motion of molten iron flowing around a superhot, solid iron core. Changes in the thickness, viscosity and conductivity of the outer core in the past could have led to convection patterns that caused the magnetic pole to tilt.”

Jimfarmer

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Re: Magnetic pole shift
« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2011, 11:22:06 AM »
Re.: “Earth’s Magnetic ‘Poles’ Once at The Equator “

Here is a clarification from http://www.zetatalk.com/science/s27.htm :
[start quote]
ZetaTalk: Pole Reversals
Note: written on Jul 15, 1995.

Do the Earth's poles ever suffer a reversal during a pole shift? No. The Earth's polarity, where the magnetic North Pole points consistently in one direction as though focused on a distant point in the Universe, does not change, ever. This is an illusion, a hypothesis that humans have concocted to explain what they find in the Earth's crust. In this hypothesis, they are assuming that the Earth's crust does not move about, but it does. What humans are measuring is the confusion in the crust, and not the direction of the magnetic North Pole. Between pole shifts, however, there are slight movements of the magnetic North Pole, especially during the time just before and after a pole shift - approximately a hundred years on either side. The giant comet speaks to the Earth from afar. Scientists who do not buy into the pole shift will argue endlessly that it is the poles that move and reverse, and any discussion with such scientists should begin by first clarifying the pole shift premise. Sometimes, during a pole shift, the movement is slight, and sometimes literal reversals take place, where the crust does, as you say, a 180. The coming shift will come close to that, being better than a quarter turn. Having only the Earth's crust to examine, and being in denial or unaware of pole shifts, a human could only assume that the poles had moved, rather than the crust.

[end copy]