Author Topic: Seeds to bring  (Read 7068 times)

enlightenme

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Seeds to bring
« on: July 28, 2011, 07:28:03 AM »
Well, as you all probably know, I'm not real computer savy, so this information may be here in some form and I just didn't see it.  I was trying to decide what type of seeds I would pick up to throw in with my gotta have takealong stuff, just to have atleast some sort of a start if all else fails. And what would be the simplest, easy to grow in most climates.  I can remember those first few years on the farm putting in huge truck patch gardens with no experience or knowledge whatsoever, was challenging  and well to say the least it took a few years to kindof figure it out (and that was with all the resources of the current world available). I wouldn't say I actually became an expert, but anyway I decided to make a list of some of the easiest to grow that I'm going to pick up while the stock is probably still available this year (ofcourse making sure it's the good old-fashioned kind not that new Monsanto, or whatever that junk is) I'm going to make sure to get several kinds of Squash, Zucchini, beans (preferably bush not pole), tomatoes, and peppers. Also, onions (though those are really hard to grow from seeds instead of sets), beets and carrots (root vegies can be really challenging in my experience anyway unless the soil is just perfect), lettuce and spinach for fast grow, cucumbers  (great for pickling for later), corn (though you gotta put in a pretty big area, atleast double rowed if I remember correctly), peas and broccoli.  I think that's going to be my total short list.  Any other gardeners out there with additional suggestions/comments?? It's been awhile, I'm sure I've probably missed some pretty obvious ones that would make really great candidates for the gotta bring category.....

bk

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2011, 09:25:04 AM »
Do not forget Herbs, Basil, Oregano, Parsley you can use to season food or mix into a salad.

  Also on the root crops Radish, Turnips, Beets you can harvest the greens of the plants to mix with salads as well. Just harvest a few leaves from each plant so it keeps growing.

  Have plenty of Bean, alfalfa for sprouts in this case it could be from Monsanto since it would not be used to save seeds, but quick short term nutrition.

  Hope this helps, Bob 

augonit

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #2 on: July 28, 2011, 12:10:57 PM »
I would strongly recommend having seeds of stuff you like to eat now.  There's no reason to carry cabbage seeds, for instance, if you hate cabbage.  Most things really are easy to grow, but it takes time.  Especially from seeds.  So factor that into your plans.  I'm planning on planting fruit trees, however, if that becomes unfeasible, I already know where orchards are in my area.  My concern is where to find nut trees!  I'd have to go into the forests.

Thehumbleman1

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2011, 02:11:47 PM »
New to the board.

Good subject, seeds.

I have some as well, herbs have medicinal properties as well as alot of fruits and veggies, no suprise I'm sure here.  Point being is keep your "favorites" but if I may suggest also fast germinating and high production types, I'm working on the assumption of nomad thinking, so radishes for example germinate fast and are a small durable plant.  Cilantro goes to seed fast, another nice one to keep.  Dark zucchini is a high production durable plant, doesn't need deep soil.  Can be in pots and portable as well.

Here's a good tomato tip I learned by forgetting the science and just got to know the plant, ironic lol.  Those little buds that some call "suckers" that grow in between the branch and stem, most people say cut off the "sucker".  Well I did the opposite, I cut off the branch instead and now my tomatoes look like shrubs, those buds turn into fruit producing trunks.  One plant right now is 30 inches high but has 44 fruit with more still coming(has 4 trunks producing, 2 more growing).  The suprise is pleasent to say the least. 

Been a guest for awhile, got some nice tips here, hope this helps as well

Yowbarb

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #4 on: April 02, 2012, 10:05:17 AM »
Well, as you all probably know, I'm not real computer savy, so this information may be here in some form and I just didn't see it.  I was trying to decide what type of seeds I would pick up to throw in with my gotta have takealong stuff, just to have atleast some sort of a start if all else fails. And what would be the simplest, easy to grow in most climates.  I can remember those first few years on the farm putting in huge truck patch gardens with no experience or knowledge whatsoever, was challenging  and well to say the least it took a few years to kindof figure it out (and that was with all the resources of the current world available). I wouldn't say I actually became an expert, but anyway I decided to make a list of some of the easiest to grow that I'm going to pick up while the stock is probably still available this year (ofcourse making sure it's the good old-fashioned kind not that new Monsanto, or whatever that junk is) I'm going to make sure to get several kinds of Squash, Zucchini, beans (preferably bush not pole), tomatoes, and peppers. Also, onions (though those are really hard to grow from seeds instead of sets), beets and carrots (root vegies can be really challenging in my experience anyway unless the soil is just perfect), lettuce and spinach for fast grow, cucumbers  (great for pickling for later), corn (though you gotta put in a pretty big area, atleast double rowed if I remember correctly), peas and broccoli.  I think that's going to be my total short list.  Any other gardeners out there with additional suggestions/comments?? It's been awhile, I'm sure I've probably missed some pretty obvious ones that would make really great candidates for the gotta bring category.....

Enlightenme I appreciate your starting this topic.
Maybe we could concoct an alphabetized seed list here...People could splice a item in, copy paste...keep it going like we did in the survival list board...
All The Best,
Yowabarb

Yowbarb

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2012, 10:12:44 AM »
Best deal I have found anywhere...
(COSTCO)
Food For Healthâ„¢ Emergency Garden Seeds23 Jumbo Seed Packets Produces 1 Acre Garden,
5 Year Shelf Life
Item # 472432
RatedOverall Rating: 4.5 out of 5  Rating Snapshot (50 reviews)
  $49.99
Shipping & Handling included


Rodfergie the link was making the page go too wide so I posted the item itself,
in your post, so it would all fit better here. PHOTO added.
Thanks for the good idea,
Yowbarb

JKB

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #6 on: May 03, 2012, 12:48:20 PM »
Hello all, just found this last night in the new Sportsmans Guide magazine.  I ordered five...  Only $22 for one.
 
http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/25-pc-emergency-seed-kit.aspx?a=967182
 
 
You have to let it all go Neo.  Fear, doubt, and disbelief...  Free your mind.

enlightenme

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #7 on: May 04, 2012, 04:03:18 AM »
Thanks for that info JKB!  I actually ordered my survival seeds through Amazon, which is available from Veganseeds.  I got a great deal, one pkg was for $39.99 the other smaller one for $22.85.  I actually used some from the smaller package this year to try them out, and so far so good.  Excellent quality, packaged well and even had instructions for the novice.  I posted it somewhere else here, not sure where though! 

bk

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #8 on: May 17, 2012, 07:07:58 PM »
Try to let some of your crops go to seed so you can practice harvesting the seeds.

I'm in the process of harvesting lettuce, spinach, and radish seeds that I planted months ago.

steedy

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #9 on: May 18, 2012, 09:08:44 AM »
I've been saving seeds for a couple years now.  I run into the problem of people thinking I'm pretty sloppy as a gardener when I let things go to seed.  But, I just think they have no idea, no matter how much I try to explain.

enlightenme

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #10 on: May 18, 2012, 06:00:17 PM »
Try to let some of your crops go to seed so you can practice harvesting the seeds.

I'm in the process of harvesting lettuce, spinach, and radish seeds that I planted months ago.


BK, Great idea!  Not something I ever felt the need to do before, but certainly a very important skill to acquire at this time.

bk

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2014, 09:01:40 PM »
Just some current info on bulk seeds.

Non-GMO Garden Seeds 2-gallon Bucket by Food for Health $89.99

Features:
100% Heirloom, Non-Hybrid, Non-GMO seeds.  2 Acre Garden Bucket, Net Weight: 5 lbs 13 oz


http://www.costco.com/Non-GMO-Garden-Seeds-2-gallon-Bucket-by-Food-for-Health.product.100018599.html

Food For Healthâ„¢ Emergency Garden Seeds, 23 Jumbo Seed Packets $49.99

Features:
Delivered in Discreet Packaging, 100% Non-Hybrid Seeds, Net Weight:  2 lbs 2 oz


http://www.costco.com/.product.11500413.html?cm_sp=RichRelevance-_-itempageVerticalRight-_-CategorySiloedViewCP&cm_vc=itempageVerticalRight|CategorySiloedViewCP

Yowbarb

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #12 on: January 23, 2014, 11:17:18 PM »
Bob E. those look like a pretty good deal.
 :)

Kyirrie

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #13 on: January 24, 2014, 05:08:20 AM »
Well, as you all probably know, I'm not real computer savy, so this information may be here in some form and I just didn't see it.  I was trying to decide what type of seeds I would pick up to throw in with my gotta have takealong stuff, just to have atleast some sort of a start if all else fails. And what would be the simplest, easy to grow in most climates.  I can remember those first few years on the farm putting in huge truck patch gardens with no experience or knowledge whatsoever, was challenging  and well to say the least it took a few years to kindof figure it out (and that was with all the resources of the current world available). I wouldn't say I actually became an expert, but anyway I decided to make a list of some of the easiest to grow that I'm going to pick up while the stock is probably still available this year (ofcourse making sure it's the good old-fashioned kind not that new Monsanto, or whatever that junk is) I'm going to make sure to get several kinds of Squash, Zucchini, beans (preferably bush not pole), tomatoes, and peppers. Also, onions (though those are really hard to grow from seeds instead of sets), beets and carrots (root vegies can be really challenging in my experience anyway unless the soil is just perfect), lettuce and spinach for fast grow, cucumbers  (great for pickling for later), corn (though you gotta put in a pretty big area, atleast double rowed if I remember correctly), peas and broccoli.  I think that's going to be my total short list.  Any other gardeners out there with additional suggestions/comments?? It's been awhile, I'm sure I've probably missed some pretty obvious ones that would make really great candidates for the gotta bring category.....
Hi Enlightenme,
I think probably the best way to go looking for seeds that aren't GMO Monsanto and all that, is when you do a search, Search "Heirloom vegetables", these are the old varieties and usually have a lot more flavour. Once you get some of these growing, then you can save the seeds yourself and stockpile them. I've got a pile of them myself, some I have sourced from growers on Ebay, and they don't cost an arm and a leg  :)
How are things going over in the states. I have heard things about some people not being allowed to grow their own veges etc... is this true?

Aldwyn

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Re: Seeds to bring
« Reply #14 on: January 24, 2014, 06:34:10 AM »
The most important thing about seeds is to have something that you want to eat.  That makes the work growing much easier.  Now that being said...

Kale is a hearty green leafy vegetable that is easy to grow and tolerates quite a bit.  It can handle cold pretty well (mine is still growing here in the dead of winter unprotected in Oklahoma).
The best part of Kale is the nutritional value of it. 

I would say that squash is easy (and it is but the squash bugs will be a problem).  You have to rotate the places you put squash though because it will drain the soil of nutrients. 

Tomatoes are not as easy as you think... I have always had them grow well until I moved to where I am and now for three years in a row I have had no yield to speak of. 

Kyirrie is right that heirloom seeds are the most important fact, so you can save seed.  Last year I saved most of my crops for seed to have somewhat of a stockpile of seed. 

I have had no trouble growing and 'not being allowed' but I do not live in a city.  The only real government in my area is the county and as long as I don't bother anyone I am left to do as I wish.  Those in the cities might need to make sure they are using 'flower beds' to grow vegetables.  A privacy fence might allow city dwellers more of an opportunity to practice their farming.  Just remember it is not as simple as put the seed in the ground and wait.  It is a skill that must be honed just like any other.
Aldwyn
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