Author Topic: Flowers and Weeds you can eat, Eat The Weeds site, etc.  (Read 7256 times)

Charlie

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Flowers and Weeds you can eat, Eat The Weeds site, etc.
« on: August 09, 2011, 10:38:24 AM »
Probably growing in your yard or garden as a weed. Most think of it as an invasive but I grow it on purpose at work and at home! It's delicious and very good for you.

Purslane nutrition...

http://www.nutrition-and-you.com/purslane.html

Pictures...

http://www.durgan.org/2011/August%202011/8%20August%202011%20Purslane%20%28Portulaca%20oleracea%29/HTML/

errrv

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Re: Flowers and Weeds you can eat, Eat The Weeds site, etc.
« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2011, 03:22:39 PM »
Same with dandelions. Everybody buys lettuce for salads & this is free to pick in your yard!!! Grows back very quickly too!

Jimfarmer

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Re: Flowers and Weeds you can eat, Eat The Weeds site, etc.
« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2011, 08:22:01 AM »
Same with Kudzu, that vine that is smothering south-east USA.

http://www.michaelokorn.de/album/kudzuvine/index.htm

augonit

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Re: Flowers and Weeds you can eat, Eat The Weeds site, etc.
« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2011, 05:19:38 PM »
Is this sticky?  This looks like stuff that grows in my yard and I was pulling it up and it felt sticky, like it had a milky substance that came out of it.

Morgana2012

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Re: Flowers and Weeds you can eat, Eat The Weeds site, etc.
« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2011, 08:42:19 PM »
I don't know....but I'm going to look for them.  Wild Grape and Poke Greens are good.  Below is a picture of wild grape vines.  Notice the spiked heart shaped leaves with the miniature clusters (1st pic) of green grapes which are not edible.  On 2nd pic Poke leaves have a smooth edge and stalk has no thorns.  Only pick the newer leaves toward the top of the plant.  Boil twice to remove any poison.  Older lower leaves towards the bottom of the plant, the stalks, as well as the red fruit are poisonous and should be avoided.  My grandmother cooked poke greens one time.  Here's a short tutorial on how to identify both and what not to eat. http://youtu.be/d5vk_5lQeX0
« Last Edit: August 12, 2011, 04:02:07 PM by Morgana2012 »

Charlie

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Re: Flowers and Weeds you can eat, Eat The Weeds site, etc.
« Reply #5 on: August 11, 2011, 06:08:00 AM »
Is this sticky?  This looks like stuff that grows in my yard and I was pulling it up and it felt sticky, like it had a milky substance that came out of it.

Mine isn't sticky augonit. Had to go pull some and see since I never really noticed. Purslane is a succulent like aloe.  The stuff I squeezed out of the stem was clear like aloe, not milky at all but I don't know enough about it to know if different soil might cause it to be different in various places.  There are different varieties of purslane though and perhaps yours is a different one than mine here.

Yowbarb

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Re: Flowers and Weeds you can eat, Eat The Weeds site, etc.
« Reply #6 on: August 10, 2012, 02:25:08 PM »
http://eattheweeds.com/  Green Deane

Green Deane







Photo: Green Deane at the piano
...

Yowbarb

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Re: Flowers and Weeds you can eat, Eat The Weeds site, etc.
« Reply #7 on: August 10, 2012, 03:25:25 PM »
Green Deane Jordan.

Green Deane is an experienced Florida wild edibles forager and he has
planted more than 12 dozen different kinds of edible plants – cultivated
and wild – in his suburban garden/yard near Orlando. Much to his
neighbors “collective horror,” he is the only one on his cul-de-sac
without a “lawn of decapitated grass.” Deane has become a culinary
expert at preparing and cooking wild edibles. His hobbies include
gardening, cooking, music, writing, dancing, canoeing, public
speaking, kayaking, cast netting, fishing, biking, and hiking in Greece.
He has a degree in music and graduate studies in communications. “In
short,” he says, “I’m paid to play and write.” And finally, he wants us
to know he’s not a vegetarian, a common misconception. To learn
more about Green Deane Jordan, visit www.EatTheWeeds.com or see
his YouTube channel at http://www.youtube.com/user/EatTheWeeds.
« Last Edit: August 10, 2012, 03:40:03 PM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Flowers and Weeds you can eat, Eat The Weeds site, etc.
« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2013, 10:02:44 PM »
42 Flowers You Can Eat

 Did you know that you can eat certain flowers? See what 42 flowers are safe to eat now!

 See here>> http://www.shtfpreparedness.com/42-flowers-you-can-eat/

Jimfarmer

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Re: Flowers and Weeds you can eat, Eat The Weeds site, etc.
« Reply #9 on: June 02, 2013, 07:31:00 AM »
Quote
42 Flowers You Can Eat

I was served a flower salad once.  It was good.

The flavors clash with some vegetables and dressings, though.

Yowbarb

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Re: Flowers and Weeds you can eat, Eat The Weeds site, etc.
« Reply #10 on: June 02, 2013, 09:14:06 AM »
Quote
42 Flowers You Can Eat

I was served a flower salad once.  It was good.

The flavors clash with some vegetables and dressings, though.

http://www.shtfpreparedness.com/42-flowers-you-can-eat/

So. As lovely as eating flowers can be, it can also be a little … deadly! Not to scare you off or anything. Follow these tips for eating flowers safely:
•Eat flowers you know to be consumable — if you are uncertain, consult a reference book on edible flowers and plants.
•Eat flowers you have grown yourself, or know to be safe for consumption. Flowers from the florist or nursery have probably been treated with pesticides or other chemicals.
•Do not eat roadside flowers or those picked in public parks. Both may have been treated with pesticide or herbicide, and roadside flowers may be polluted by car exhaust.
•Eat only the petals, and remove pistils and stamens before eating.
•If you suffer from allergies, introduce edible flowers gradually, as they may exacerbate allergies.
•To keep flowers fresh, place them on moist paper towels and refrigerate in an airtight container. Some will last up to 10 days this way. Ice water can revitalize limp flowers.

See what 42 flowers are safe to eat by clicking the link below!
http://www.treehugger.com/green-food/42-flowers-you-can-eat.html

Allium to Carnations
1. Allium
 All blossoms from the allium family (leeks, chives, garlic, garlic chives) are edible and flavorful! Flavors run the gamut from delicate leek to robust garlic. Every part of these plants is edible.

2. Angelica
Depending on the variety, flowers range from pale lavender-blue to deep rose and have a licorice-like flavor.

3. Anise hyssop
Both flowers and leaves have a subtle anise or licorice flavor.

4. Arugula
Blossoms are small with dark centers and with a peppery flavor much like the leaves. They range in color from white to yellow with dark purple streaks.

5. Bachelor’s button
Grassy in flavor, the petals are edible. Avoid the bitter calyx.

6. Basil
Blossoms come in a variety of colors, from white to pink to lavender; flavor is similar to the leaves, but milder.

7. Bee balm
The red flowers have a minty flavor.

8. Borage
Blossoms are a lovely blue hue and taste like cucumber!

9. Calendula / marigold
A great flower for eating, calendula blossoms are peppery, tangy, and spicy — and their vibrant golden color adds dash to any dish.

10. Carnations / dianthus
Petals are sweet, once trimmed away from the base. The blossoms taste like their sweet, perfumed aroma.
Chamomile to Violets

11. Chamomile
Small and daisylike, the flowers have a sweet flavor and are often used in tea. Ragweed sufferers may be allergic to chamomile.

12. Chervil
Delicate blossoms and flavor, which is anise-tinged.

13. Chicory
Mildly bitter earthiness of chicory is evident in the petals and buds, which can be pickled.

14. Chrysanthemum
A little bitter, mums come in a rainbow of colors and a range of flavors range from peppery to pungent. Use only the petals.

15. Cilantro
Like the leaves, people either love the blossoms or hate them. The flowers share the grassy flavor of the herb. Use them fresh as they lose their charm when heated.

16. Citrus (orange, lemon, lime, grapefruit, kumquat)
Citrus blossoms are sweet and highly scented. Use frugally or they will over-perfume a dish.

17. Clover
Flowers are sweet with a hint of licorice.

18. Dandelion
Read more about dandelions here: Backyard Forage for Dandelions.

19. Dill
Yellow dill flowers taste much like the herb’s leaves.

20. English daisy
These aren’t the best-tasting petals — they are somewhat bitter — but they look great!

21. Fennel
Yellow fennel flowers are eye candy with a subtle licorice flavor, much like the herb itself.

22. Fuchsia
Tangy fuchsia flowers make a beautiful garnish.

23. Gladiolus
Who knew? Although gladioli are bland, they can be stuffed, or their petals removed for an interesting salad garnish.

24. Hibiscus
Famously used in hibiscus tea, the vibrant cranberry flavor is tart and can be used sparingly.

25. Hollyhock
Bland and vegetal in flavor, hollyhock blossoms make a showy, edible garnish.

26. Impatiens
Flowers don’t have much flavor — best as a pretty garnish or for candying.

27. Jasmine
These super-fragrant blooms are used in tea; you can also use them in sweet dishes, but sparingly.

28. Johnny Jump-Up
Adorable and delicious, the flowers have a subtle mint flavor great for salads, pastas, fruit dishes and drinks.

29. Lavender
Sweet, spicy, and perfumed, the flowers are a great addition to both savory and sweet dishes.

30. Lemon berbena
The diminutive off-white blossoms are redolent of lemon — and great for teas and desserts.

31. Lilac
The blooms are pungent, but the floral citrusy aroma translates to its flavor as well.

32. Mint
The flowers are — surprise! — minty. Their intensity varies among varieties.

33. Nasturtium
One of the most popular edible flowers, nasturtium blossoms are brilliantly colored with a sweet, floral flavor bursting with a spicy pepper finish. When the flowers go to seed, the seed pod is a marvel of sweet and spicy. You can stuff flowers, add leaves to salads, pickle buds like capers, and garnish to your heart’s content.

34. Oregano
The flowers are a pretty, subtle version of the leaf.

35. Pansy
The petals are somewhat nondescript, but if you eat the whole flower you get more taste.

36. Radish
Varying in color, radish flowers have a distinctive, peppery bite.

37. Rose
Remove the white, bitter base and the remaining petals have a strongly perfumed flavor perfect for floating in drinks or scattering across desserts, and for a variety of jams. All roses are edible, with flavor more pronounced in darker varieties.

38. Rosemary
Flowers taste like a milder version of the herb; nice used as a garnish on dishes that incorporate rosemary.

39. Sage
Blossoms have a subtle flavor similar to the leaves.

40. Squash and pumpkin
Blossoms from both are wonderful vehicles for stuffing, each having a slight squash flavor. Remove stamens before using.

41. Sunflower
Petals can be eaten, and the bud can be steamed like an artichoke.

42. Violets
Another famous edible flower, violets are floral, sweet and beautiful as garnishes. Use the flowers in salads and to garnish desserts and drinks.

From True Food: Eight Simple Steps to a Healthier You (National Geographic, 2009) by Annie B. Bond, Melissa Breyer and Wendy Gordon.

Yowbarb

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Re: Flowers and Weeds you can eat, Eat The Weeds site, etc.
« Reply #11 on: July 30, 2013, 12:38:30 PM »
http://www.commonsensehome.com/

http://www.commonsensehome.com/cooking-weeds/ 

"I decided this summer to move beyond using wild edibles in salad and medicine to experiment with cooking weeds.  Goosefoot, also known as lamb’s quarters, was a taste and texture very similar to spinach, so I decided to use it in a version of a a Greek spinach pie (Spanakopita).  Our vast colonies of milkweed plants are loaded with blooms and milkweed seed pods, so I decided to give those a try as well.  My sister was visiting, so I knew she would be brave enough to eat some with me.

Goosefoot Pie Recipe

A Twist on Spanakopita (Greek Spinach Pie)

Ingredients
•1 large onion, chopped
•1/2 cup butter
•1/8 teaspoon salt
•1 tablespoon fresh dill, minced
•1 tablespoon fresh parsley, minced
•1 teaspoon fresh mint, minced (peppermint, spearmint or chocolate mint)
•12 -14 ounces of fresh goosefoot (lamb’s quarters) (or a 10 ounce package of frozen spinach, thawed)
•1/4 pound feta cheese
•1 tablespoon Parmesan cheese, preferably freshly grated
•2 eggs or one duck egg
•1 pound phyllo dough pastry sheets plus additional butter/olive oil if needed*

*Note:  When I used Pepperidge Farm puff pastry sheets, I found that the dough layers were already pretreated with an oil blend and did not require brushing with additional butter/olive oil before baking.  When I used Athens brand, it was a more traditional phyllo dough, containing thin dry sheets of pastry that required the application of butter/olive oil before baking.  If you are using traditional phyllo (pastry sheets without oil or butter), you will need an additional 1/4 cup of melted butter and 1/4 cup of olive oil.  The oil and butter is mixed together and brushed onto each layer of the pastry sheets before baking.

Directions

For cooking, you want to select young, tender goosefoot that has not started blooming or going to seed.  Harvest the top growth.  If you prune back to a side branch, you will likely get multiple flushes of fresh growth from one plant.  I’ve got a few in my corn patch that I keep growing just for this purpose.

This was the goosefoot (lamb’s quarters) I used to make one batch of pie.



In a large skillet, melt 1/2 cup butter and saute onions until translucent.  While onion is cooking, wash the goosefoot thoroughly and chop into roughly one inch square pieces, removing any really tough stems.  There’s no need to be exact – just make sure you can stuff them into your mouth easily and they are roughly the same size so they cook evenly.

Add the goosefoot and salt to pan with the butter.

Cook until tender.  Add dill, parsley and mint.  Cook for a few more minutes.  Remove from heat and cool slightly.



In a medium bowl, beat eggs, mix in crumbled or finely diced feta cheese and Parmesan cheese.  Add to spinach mixture.  Preheat oven to 350F.

To assemble:

Thaw dough per package directions.  The Pepperidge Farm type was easier to work with when it was only partially thawed, as it got soft and sticky when completely thawed.  The Athens type needed to be completely thawed.  Cover one sheet with waxed paper and a damp cloth while working with the other.  To use the Pepperidge Farm phyllo sheets, I simply place one on the pan, spread the goosefoot mixture evenly over over the top, then placed the second sheet of phyllo on top of the goosefoot mixture.  With traditional phyllo, each sheet should be brushed with a mix of butter and olive oil before assembling.

Here’s the pie, waiting for the top set of phyllo sheets.



To ensure even cooking, I cut the assembled pie width-wise into three uniform sections.  Bake at 350 degrees F for around 25 to 30 minutes, until golden brown.



The boys really liked this dish, so much that they asked me to make it again – soon. So far I have made it three times with good results. The flavor of the goosefoot is affected by heat, as I noticed that the last batch (prepared after a week of 90+ temps) was stronger in flavor than previous batches, although still good.  Lamb’s quarters is high in calcium, vitamin A and B vitamins.  It is also high in oxalic acid, so those that are sensitive should be aware of this.

If you like, you can make a simple yogurt sauce to go with the pie.  I enjoyed it, the boys just wolfed theirs down plain.
......




Yowbarb

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Re: Flowers and Weeds you can eat, Eat The Weeds site, etc.
« Reply #12 on: July 30, 2013, 03:50:49 PM »
Yowbarb Note: This is too long an article with too many images for me to easily copy right now.
I recommend this article which is about these plants:

1.   Cat-tail
2.   Burdock
3.   Pignut
4.   Silverweed
5.   Stinging Nettle

Just a sample of one, Burdock (also a variety called Lesser Burdock)
- Yowbarb
...

Image: The leaves of greater burdock growing in East Sussex, UK. Photo: Paul Kirtley.


...
Image:  The leaves of lesser burdock growing in Ontario, Canada. Photo: Paul Kirtley.




Burdock has a wide geographical distribution in temperate parts of the world with these species being found throughout Europe to Russia, the Middle East and Asia. Burdock is popular in Asian cuisine. Both lesser- and greater burdock are thought to have been introduced to North America from Europe. Lesser burdock is by far the more common of the two in North America, where it is known as common burdock.
.......
...
Five Survival Plants Every Forager Should Know

Posted By Paul Kirtley On July 28, 2013 @ 01:47 In Edible Wild Plants,Living off the Land

http://paulkirtley.co.uk/2013/five-survival-plants-every-forager-should-know/


NativeMom72

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Re: Flowers and Weeds you can eat, Eat The Weeds site, etc.
« Reply #13 on: April 06, 2014, 09:10:46 AM »
What great posts!

I found this and wanted to share this list from an article about edible weeds, some were mentioned previously, some are new additions :)

*source http://www.treehugger.com/lawn-garden/eat-dandelions-9-edible-garden-weeds.html

Please eat the dandelions: 9 edible garden weeds

1. Dandelion:

The quintessential garden and lawn weed, dandelions have a bad reputation among those who want grass that looks as uniform as a golf course, but every part of this common edible weed is tasty both raw and cooked, from the roots to the blossoms. Dandelion leaves can be harvested at any point in the growing season, and while the smaller leaves are considered to be less bitter and more palatable raw, the bigger leaves can be eaten as well, especially as an addition to a green salad. If raw dandelion leaves don't appeal to you, they can also be steamed or added to a stir-fry or soup, which can make them taste less bitter. The flowers are sweet and crunchy, and can be eaten raw, or breaded and fried, or even used to make dandelion wine. The root of the dandelion can be dried and roasted and used as a coffee substitute, or added to any recipe that calls for root vegetables.

2. Purslane

ZooFari/CC BY 3.0
Purslane can often be found in moist garden beds, lawns, and shady areas, where it lies close to the ground and often goes unnoticed. This humble garden weed, however, is a nutritional powerhouse, as it is said to contain more omega-3 fatty acids than any other leafy vegetable, and can be a great addition to a salad or stir-fry, or used to thicken soups or stews. Purslane is a succulent, with a crispy texture, and the leaves and stems can be eaten raw or cooked to add a peppery flavor to any dish.

3. Clover

Cliff/CC BY 3.0
Other than the occasional four-leafed clover hunt, this common lawn weed goes mostly unnoticed, but is an important food for honeybees and bumblebees, and clover leaves and flowers can be used to add variety to meals. Small amounts of raw clover leaves can be chopped into salads, or can be sauteed and added to dishes for a green accent, and the flowers of both red and white clover can be eaten raw or cooked, or dried for tea.

4. Lamb's Quarters

Wendell Smith/CC BY 3.0
The young shoots and leaves of Lamb's Quarters (also known as goosefoot) can be eaten raw in any vegetable dish, or sauteed or steamed and used anywhere spinach is called for. The seeds of the Lamb's Quarters, which resemble quinoa, can also be harvested and eaten, although it takes a lot of patience to gather enough to make it worthwhile.

5. Plantain

Calin Darabus/CC BY 3.0
This common lawn weed (not to be confused with the tropical fruit also called plantain) is not only a great medicinal plant that can be used topically to soothe burns, stings, rashes, and wounds, but is also a great edible green for the table. The young leaves of plantain can be eaten raw, steamed, boiled, or sauteed, and while the older leaves can be a bit tough, they can also be cooked and eaten as well. The seeds of the plantain, which are produced on a distinctive flower spike, can be cooked like a grain or ground into a flour, and are related to the more well-known psyllium seeds, which are sold as a fiber supplement and natural laxative.

6. Chickweed

Leslie Seaton/CC BY 3.0
This rather unassuming garden weed can be harvested and used for both food and medicine. Chickweed leaves, stems, and flowers can all be eaten either raw or cooked, where it adds a delicate spinach-like taste to any dish. The plant can also be used as a topical poultice for minor cuts, burns, or rashes, and can be made into a tea for use as a mild diuretic.

7. Mallow

pawpaw67/CC BY 3.0
Mallow, or malva, is also known as cheeseweed, due to the shape of its seed pods, and can be found in many lawns or garden beds across the US. The leaves and the seed pods (also called the 'fruit') are both edible, either raw or cooked, and like many greens, are often more tender and palatable when smaller and less mature. The older leaves can be used like any other cooked green after steaming, boiling, or sauteeing them.

8. Wild Amaranth

United Soybean Board/CC BY 3.0
The leaves of the wild amaranth, also known as pigweed, are another great addition to any dish that calls for leafy greens, and while the younger leaves are softer and tastier, the older leaves can also be cooked like spinach. The seeds of the wild amaranth can be gathered and cooked just like store-bought amaranth, either as a cooked whole grain or as a ground meal, and while it does take a bit of time to gather enough to add to a meal, they can be a a good source of free protein.

9. Curly Dock

Michael Gras/CC BY 3.0
Curly dock (also called yellow dock) leaves can be eaten raw when young, or cooked when older, and added to salads or soups. The stems of the dock plant can be peeled and eaten either cooked or raw, and the mature seeds can be boiled, or eaten raw, or roasted to make a coffee substitute. Dock leaves are rather tart, and because of their high oxalic acid content, it's often recommended to only eat them in moderation, as well as to change the water several times during cooking.



“Perceive that which cannot be seen with the eye.”
― Miyamoto Musashi  (1584 –1645)

ilinda

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Re: Flowers and Weeds you can eat, Eat The Weeds site, etc.
« Reply #14 on: April 07, 2014, 05:29:02 PM »
Thanks for posting this, as many of these are vey commonly found in spring, summer and/or fall. 

One interesting tidbit about chickweed is that it is high in copper, thus useful to goat owners who want to help their goats remain worm-free.  Goats are subject to the same internal parasites as deer and sheep, and should be rotated to different pastures every few years, at least every 3 years.  Plus, if they get enough copper in their diets, they are much less likely to be infested with parasites, as the invaders do not do well in an environment where there is copper.  Neither chickweed nor copper will kill parasites, but they make the intestines less hospitable for them to take up residence.

And besides humans and goats do like chickweed, so it's a winner all around.