Author Topic: Ancient Japanese foods for on the road: Salted Umeboshi plum rice balls, etc.  (Read 7582 times)

Yowbarb

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Dried salted umeboshi plums rolled up into a rice ball... simple good an ancient travel food the Japanese have used for ages...
I first heard about it in the 1970s. I used to eat the dried salted umeboshi but never have made the rice balls.
I think this would be a good survival food, long lasting and gives some variety from other foods on the road.
Will be posting a couple recipes and a video here.
- Yowbarb


http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_AdeUgwXpSAM/SwoazXIPSHI/AAAAAAAASZQ/r-WTghp9qpg/s400/umeboshi+nigiri.jpg

Yowbarb

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If anyone knows a good source of the umeboshi plums, for use n the rice balls. please post ehre.
Will be looking for that. The umeboshi rice balls are a good travel survival food. - YB

Ingredients:
Umeboshi Plums, Sea Salt, Beefsteak Leaves (shiso)


Yowbarb

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From Dirk Benedict's website, a recipe for the umeboshi plum balls. Some may remember Dirk from the A Team TV series and Battlestar Galactica. Dirk has been macrobiotic since the 1970s.

http://dirkbenedictcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=360

Posted by: DonnaRedRockMom of Louisville, KY

"I have been asked for this recipe by several people so I thought I would share it here with all interested:

Rice balls can be made ahead of time and kept for several days without refrigeration making them very convenient for travel, picnics, and just about anywhere you need a quick pick me up without hassles...it is the perfect food for a person on the go Aveline Kushi calls them the macrobiotics’ alternative to fast food:

1 sheet nori
1 cup cooked brown rice
1/2 - 1 umeboshi plum

Toast a thin sheet of nori by holding the shiny side about 10-12 inches over a low flame. Rotate for 3-5 seconds, or until the color changes from black to green. Fold the nori in half and tear it into 2 pieces. Fold and tear again. There should now be 4 pieces (3x3)

Add a pinch of salt to a dish of water and use it to wet hands. Form a handful of rice into a solid ball. Press a hole in the center with your thumb and place a small piece of umeboshi inside. Then close the hole and press the ball together again until it is slid. Cover the rice ball with nori, one piece at a time until it sticks. Dampen your hands occasionally to prevent the rice and nori from sticking to them but do not use too much water.

Variations: Rice balls can be rolled into toasted sesame seeds, green veggies, shiso leaves, dried wakame sheets, or other things you think of.....experiment and enjoy....you can also try other things inside like fish, veggies and other things you enjoy....be careful about what you put inside as some things will need to be eaten right away or refrigerated.

Enjoy...and experiment while cooking you never know what you might discover."

Donna

Montanabarb

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From Dirk Benedict's website, a recipe for the umeboshi plum balls. Some may remember Dirk from the A Team TV series and Battlestar Galactica. Dirk has been macrobiotic since the 1970s.

http://dirkbenedictcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=360

Wow, what a small world. Dirk (his real name) Benedict (not his real name) grew up here in White Sulphur and graduated high school here in the nineteen sixties. His mom (still lives here) is our good friend. He stated frankly on a TV show called "The Other Side" that when, in his twenties, he was diagnosed with prostate cancer, he refused the recommended treatment, came home, took a bag of rice and some vegetables, and "went to the mountains for six weeks." His cancer disappeared and he's been vegetarian (macrobiotic) ever since. I'm about to visit his website.

(So what does that have to do with anything?  Nothing much.  :D)
« Last Edit: August 22, 2011, 11:20:57 AM by Montanabarb »

Yowbarb

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Here is the ehow recipe for the rice balls with salted umeboshi plum.

Posted farther below is a video, just some info on the various types of rice balls which are prepared, how to open them, etc.
Best bet probably to make your own. Still looking for a good video on that, how to make your own - in English.   BTW this ehow recipe articlesays they keep 3 days I had thought they kept konger than that, based upon something I read inna macrobiotic book in the 1970s. Will look into that more. - Yowbarb

...
How to Make Macrobiotic Rice Balls
By Liza Blau, eHow Contributor

Read more: How to Make Macrobiotic Rice Balls | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_5718296_make-macrobiotic-rice-balls.html#ixzz1VmZmVJ6O

Things You'll Need

    Short-grain brown rice
    Nori seaweed
    Umeboshi plums

Read more: How to Make Macrobiotic Rice Balls | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_5718296_make-macrobiotic-rice-balls.html#ixzz1VmarYDoO

Macrobiotics is a predominantly vegetarian diet that combines yin (expansive) and yang (contractive) foods to promote health, well-being and longevity. Macrobiotic philosophy believes that an imbalance in the body of yin and yang energies is what causes health problems. The macrobiotic meal recommendations consist of grains, beans, vegetables and other locally grown, seasonal food. Macrobiotic rice balls combine rice (yin) with seaweed (yang) for a perfectly balanced snack that keeps up to three days without refrigeration.


Instructions


1

Boil or pressure cook 1 cup of short-grain brown rice. Short-grain brown rice is the most balanced variety of rice. The recipe for boiled rice is 1 cup of rice to 2 cups of water, cooked for 1 hour. Pressure-cooked rice requires 1 cup of rice and 1 1/2 cups of water, cooked for 50 minutes. Pressure-cooked rice tastes a bit sweeter.

2

After the rice cools, wet your hands and shape the rice into several small balls. Pack the rice as tightly as possible.

3

Poke a hole in the center of each rice ball with your thumb and insert a small piece of umeboshi plum or 1/2 teaspoon of umeboshi plum paste. Umboshi is a Japanese pickled plum renowned for its healing, digestive and strengthening qualities. The pickling of the umboshi plum transforms the yin nature of the fruit, making it more yang and balanced. Close the hole and pack the rice ball until it's solid again. Umeboshi plum also helps keep the rice balls fresh without refrigeration.

4

Toast a sheet of nori seaweed by holding it for a few seconds over a gas flame or hot stove burner until it turns dark green. Tear the sheet into four equal squares, pressing each square tightly around the rice ball until the nori sticks to the rice, and the ball is completely covered

Read more: How to Make Macrobiotic Rice Balls | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_5718296_make-macrobiotic-rice-balls.html#ixzz1Vmb8jNNS

======================================================
Video
LINK:  http://youtu.be/zaaSZOH8FNs

Uploaded by japanvideophoto on Dec 30, 2010

I show 3 different types of Japanese Rice Balls which are called Onigiri in Japanese お握り or 御握り. I also show a Nattou なっとう Temaki. Onigiri are a very popular and traditional snack food in Japan. If you go into any convenience store they will all have a wide selection of rice balls on sale. So if you ever visit Japan, I recommend you at least try a few Onigiri. Most people think of Sushi when it comes to Japanese food, and some even mistake onigiri as being sushi (which they are not). Japan has so many unique and delicious foods to try, so if you ever get the chance to visit be a little bit adventurous and experiment :)

....

Yowbarb

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From Dirk Benedict's website, a recipe for the umeboshi plum balls. Some may remember Dirk from the A Team TV series and Battlestar Galactica. Dirk has been macrobiotic since the 1970s.

http://dirkbenedictcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=360

Wow, what a small world. Dirk (his real name) Benedict (not his real name) grew up here in White Sulphur and graduated high school here in the nineteen sixties. His mom (still lives here) is our good friend. He stated frankly on a TV show called "The Other Side" that when, in his twenties, he was diagnosed with prostate cancer, he refused the recommended treatment, came home, took a bag of rice and some vegetables, and "went to the mountains for six weeks." His cancer disappeared and he's been vegetarian (macrobiotic) ever since. I'm about to visit his website.

Montanabarb wow yes small world. He is one of those unforgettable people.
Being an old flower child I remember back to those days when I heard via the grapevine he had done all that, then I later read his article about how he escaped the regular med docs, literally ran out of the hospital. Note: I am not recommending everyone do this but I say try it... or other methods and one should do all one can...
Thanks,
Yowbarb

Yowbarb

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From Dirk Benedict's website, a recipe for the umeboshi plum balls. Some may remember Dirk from the A Team TV series and Battlestar Galactica. Dirk has been macrobiotic since the 1970s.

http://dirkbenedictcentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=360

Wow, what a small world. Dirk (his real name) Benedict (not his real name) grew up here in White Sulphur and graduated high school here in the nineteen sixties. His mom (still lives here) is our good friend. He stated frankly on a TV show called "The Other Side" that when, in his twenties, he was diagnosed with prostate cancer, he refused the recommended treatment, came home, took a bag of rice and some vegetables, and "went to the mountains for six weeks." His cancer disappeared and he's been vegetarian (macrobiotic) ever since. I'm about to visit his website.

(So what does that have to do with anything?  Nothing much.  :D)

Montanabarb... thanks again for the "Dirk Benedict" story.  8)
If you come across any source of the umeboshi, either small trees sold online, or the seed, or the cheap source of prepared dried salted umeboshi please post it here. I have not found it yet. It would be a good survival recipe if it were easy enough for people to get the ingredients.
It is something which could be produced in large quantities, wrapped up and taken on the road for a survival caravan. The salty plum is really appealing and good.
I feel the umeboshi tree is one which could be cultivated in the Aftertime, going to try and post on it in one of the Gardening Topics. Foods like the rice could be stocked up on... the ume tree could be grown...No idea what climate it needs. 
Probably very difficult to grow the rice in the Aftertime... ?
Yowbarb

Ume tree



http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_USzog_GOzyA/ReOqZSBD_FI/AAAAAAAAAXQ/SYTL1wZfB3w/s320/ume-2.jpg

http://japanvisitor.blogspot.com/2007_02_01_archive.html

Yowbarb

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http://www.ehow.com/how_7347368_grow-umeboshi-plant.html

How to Grow an Umeboshi Plant
 
By Bonnie Grant, eHow Contributor

Things You'll Need
 
Peat moss

Plastic bag

Prunus mume seed

Pot

Compost

Water pot

Fish emulsion

Shovel

Stake

Garden twine

Pruners

 
Umeboshi is a popular canned or pickled fruit from Japan. It is eaten as a condiment or on its own and it comes from the Japanese apricot or Prunus mume. The fruit is actually a plum but the apricot is also in the Prunus family. The tree was introduced from China and is an important part of the early spring plum festivals held in Japan. Plum blossoms are very fragrant and the sheer number of plum trees in Japan scents the air. Ume fruit are sour compared to western plums which is why they are processed before eating.

Instructions:
 1   Place the seed in a bed of peat moss inside the plastic bag. Put it in the refrigerator for four months. This will stratify the seed or give it a required period of chilling before germination. The refrigerator is simulating a winter for the seed.

2     Fill the pot with compost and plant the seed with just a thin layer of compost to cover it. Water the seeds and keep the pot in a warm light area to germinate. Water daily or as needed to keep the pot evenly moist on the top.

3    Fertilize after the seedling has four true leaves at approximately 3 to 4 inches high. Add a dilution of fish fertilizer to the water in a rate recommended by the manufacturer.

4    Transplant the tree when it is several feet high. Plant it in the ground in late winter or early spring before the new leaf buds open. Dig the hole as deep as the root ball and an inch wider and spread the roots on the seedling out in the hole. Mix 2 inches of compost into the back fill pile of soil and re-fill the hole. Tamp the soil around the roots but do not bury the stem.

 5    Prune the tree in summer to keep the shape and open up the center. Remove all the dead and broken wood. Stake the tree if it starts to lean. Prunus mum will flower in February to March and will produce hairy yellow fruits.

Read more: How to Grow an Umeboshi Plant | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_7347368_grow-umeboshi-plant.html#ixzz1r6RCZiIO


Read more: How to Grow an Umeboshi Plant | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_7347368_grow-umeboshi-plant.html#ixzz1r6R0Wf7g

Read more: How to Grow an Umeboshi Plant | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_7347368_grow-umeboshi-plant.html#ixzz1r6Ql0bxP

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Yowbarb

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Growing Rice in Vermont by Josh Brill — Kickstarter

www.kickstarter.com/projects/840980225/growing-rice-in-vermont

Sep 17, 2011 - Josh Brill is raising funds for Growing Rice in Vermont on Kickstarter! We want to supply Vermont with local organic rice and educate folks in ...

NativeMom72

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Here is the ehow recipe for the rice balls with salted umeboshi plum.

Posted farther below is a video, just some info on the various types of rice balls which are prepared, how to open them, etc.
Best bet probably to make your own. Still looking for a good video on that, how to make your own - in English.   BTW this ehow recipe articlesays they keep 3 days I had thought they kept konger than that, based upon something I read inna macrobiotic book in the 1970s. Will look into that more. - Yowbarb

...
How to Make Macrobiotic Rice Balls
By Liza Blau, eHow Contributor

Read more: How to Make Macrobiotic Rice Balls | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_5718296_make-macrobiotic-rice-balls.html#ixzz1VmZmVJ6O

Things You'll Need

    Short-grain brown rice
    Nori seaweed
    Umeboshi plums

Read more: How to Make Macrobiotic Rice Balls | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_5718296_make-macrobiotic-rice-balls.html#ixzz1VmarYDoO

Macrobiotics is a predominantly vegetarian diet that combines yin (expansive) and yang (contractive) foods to promote health, well-being and longevity. Macrobiotic philosophy believes that an imbalance in the body of yin and yang energies is what causes health problems. The macrobiotic meal recommendations consist of grains, beans, vegetables and other locally grown, seasonal food. Macrobiotic rice balls combine rice (yin) with seaweed (yang) for a perfectly balanced snack that keeps up to three days without refrigeration.


Instructions


1

Boil or pressure cook 1 cup of short-grain brown rice. Short-grain brown rice is the most balanced variety of rice. The recipe for boiled rice is 1 cup of rice to 2 cups of water, cooked for 1 hour. Pressure-cooked rice requires 1 cup of rice and 1 1/2 cups of water, cooked for 50 minutes. Pressure-cooked rice tastes a bit sweeter.

2

After the rice cools, wet your hands and shape the rice into several small balls. Pack the rice as tightly as possible.

3

Poke a hole in the center of each rice ball with your thumb and insert a small piece of umeboshi plum or 1/2 teaspoon of umeboshi plum paste. Umboshi is a Japanese pickled plum renowned for its healing, digestive and strengthening qualities. The pickling of the umboshi plum transforms the yin nature of the fruit, making it more yang and balanced. Close the hole and pack the rice ball until it's solid again. Umeboshi plum also helps keep the rice balls fresh without refrigeration.

4

Toast a sheet of nori seaweed by holding it for a few seconds over a gas flame or hot stove burner until it turns dark green. Tear the sheet into four equal squares, pressing each square tightly around the rice ball until the nori sticks to the rice, and the ball is completely covered

Read more: How to Make Macrobiotic Rice Balls | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_5718296_make-macrobiotic-rice-balls.html#ixzz1Vmb8jNNS

======================================================
Video
LINK:  http://youtu.be/zaaSZOH8FNs

Uploaded by japanvideophoto on Dec 30, 2010

I show 3 different types of Japanese Rice Balls which are called Onigiri in Japanese お握り or 御握り. I also show a Nattou なっとう Temaki. Onigiri are a very popular and traditional snack food in Japan. If you go into any convenience store they will all have a wide selection of rice balls on sale. So if you ever visit Japan, I recommend you at least try a few Onigiri. Most people think of Sushi when it comes to Japanese food, and some even mistake onigiri as being sushi (which they are not). Japan has so many unique and delicious foods to try, so if you ever get the chance to visit be a little bit adventurous and experiment :)

....

Thank you for posting!
This looks delicious-- I have an Asian food supermarket nearby, I am going to look for these ingredients and try them out! I agree that this could be a good survival food and an awesome, fairly inexpensive travel food- especially with two ravenous boys ;)
:D
~pB
“Perceive that which cannot be seen with the eye.”
― Miyamoto Musashi  (1584 –1645)

Yowbarb

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Here is the ehow recipe for the rice balls with salted umeboshi plum.

Posted farther below is a video, just some info on the various types of rice balls which are prepared, how to open them, etc.
Best bet probably to make your own. Still looking for a good video on that, how to make your own - in English.   BTW this ehow recipe articlesays they keep 3 days I had thought they kept konger than that, based upon something I read inna macrobiotic book in the 1970s. Will look into that more. - Yowbarb

...
How to Make Macrobiotic Rice Balls
By Liza Blau, eHow Contributor

Read more: How to Make Macrobiotic Rice Balls | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_5718296_make-macrobiotic-rice-balls.html#ixzz1VmZmVJ6O

Things You'll Need

    Short-grain brown rice
    Nori seaweed
    Umeboshi plums

Read more: How to Make Macrobiotic Rice Balls | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_5718296_make-macrobiotic-rice-balls.html#ixzz1VmarYDoO

Macrobiotics is a predominantly vegetarian diet that combines yin (expansive) and yang (contractive) foods to promote health, well-being and longevity. Macrobiotic philosophy believes that an imbalance in the body of yin and yang energies is what causes health problems. The macrobiotic meal recommendations consist of grains, beans, vegetables and other locally grown, seasonal food. Macrobiotic rice balls combine rice (yin) with seaweed (yang) for a perfectly balanced snack that keeps up to three days without refrigeration.


Instructions


1

Boil or pressure cook 1 cup of short-grain brown rice. Short-grain brown rice is the most balanced variety of rice. The recipe for boiled rice is 1 cup of rice to 2 cups of water, cooked for 1 hour. Pressure-cooked rice requires 1 cup of rice and 1 1/2 cups of water, cooked for 50 minutes. Pressure-cooked rice tastes a bit sweeter.

2

After the rice cools, wet your hands and shape the rice into several small balls. Pack the rice as tightly as possible.

3

Poke a hole in the center of each rice ball with your thumb and insert a small piece of umeboshi plum or 1/2 teaspoon of umeboshi plum paste. Umboshi is a Japanese pickled plum renowned for its healing, digestive and strengthening qualities. The pickling of the umboshi plum transforms the yin nature of the fruit, making it more yang and balanced. Close the hole and pack the rice ball until it's solid again. Umeboshi plum also helps keep the rice balls fresh without refrigeration.

4

Toast a sheet of nori seaweed by holding it for a few seconds over a gas flame or hot stove burner until it turns dark green. Tear the sheet into four equal squares, pressing each square tightly around the rice ball until the nori sticks to the rice, and the ball is completely covered

Read more: How to Make Macrobiotic Rice Balls | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_5718296_make-macrobiotic-rice-balls.html#ixzz1Vmb8jNNS

======================================================
Video
LINK:  http://youtu.be/zaaSZOH8FNs

Uploaded by japanvideophoto on Dec 30, 2010

I show 3 different types of Japanese Rice Balls which are called Onigiri in Japanese お握り or 御握り. I also show a Nattou なっとう Temaki. Onigiri are a very popular and traditional snack food in Japan. If you go into any convenience store they will all have a wide selection of rice balls on sale. So if you ever visit Japan, I recommend you at least try a few Onigiri. Most people think of Sushi when it comes to Japanese food, and some even mistake onigiri as being sushi (which they are not). Japan has so many unique and delicious foods to try, so if you ever get the chance to visit be a little bit adventurous and experiment :)

....

Thank you for posting!
This looks delicious-- I have an Asian food supermarket nearby, I am going to look for these ingredients and try them out! I agree that this could be a good survival food and an awesome, fairly inexpensive travel food- especially with two ravenous boys ;)
:D
~pB
It's possible your boys might like the rice balls...the umeboshi has a wonderful sweet-salty flavor.
I used to buy them and eat them...made the rice balls a few times...
No telling what kids will eat -especially boys.  ;D

Yowbarb

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Yowbarb Note:
Homemade Miso soup might keep pretty well too, for a bug-out picnic cooler. For kids cook it well... It might be a good to-go food in little containers...
Link on freezing it after this recipe.

..............................................................
http://vegetarian.about.com/od/soupssalads/r/MisoSoup.htm

"Try this Vegetable Miso Soup recipe for a heartier soup."

•2 cups tomatoes, diced

•1/4 cup sesame oil
•1 leek, sliced
•1 1/2 cups shiitake mushrooms, sliced
•6 cups vegetable broth
•2 tbsp diced wakame seaweed or other seaweed
•1 package silken (soft) tofu, cubed
•1 tbsp soy sauce
•3 tbsp miso
•2 scallions (green onions), sliced

Preparation

In a large pot, sautee the tomatoes, leek and mushroom for 1-3 minutes.

Add vegetable broth, seaweed and tofu and bring to a slow simmer. Add the tofu, soy sauce, miso and scallions and reduce heat to low.

Stir well to dissolve and mix the miso. Allow to cook for at least 8 more minutes.
...
http://www.ehow.com/how_7675484_freeze-miso-soup.html

Instructions

1  Pour the cooled soup into plastic cups in portion-sized amounts. Place the cups in the freezer.

2  Take the frozen soup out of the cups and place them in a freezer bag. This allows for more space in your freezer and allows for long term preservation.


3  Place the frozen soup in a microwave safe bowl and heat it up when you are ready to eat it.