Author Topic: Old American Skills for Primitive Living  (Read 4834 times)

Yowbarb

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Old American Skills for Primitive Living
« on: October 17, 2011, 06:55:47 AM »
Hi All, noproblemo2 had posted some videos in Native American Survival Wisdom.
reposting them here. Also posting the into...
I had posted a few things there too which may or may not be made by Native Americans so they are being moved here too.  :)
All The Best,
Yowbarb

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From noprpblemo2 -
Naked Into The Wilderness - Intro Primitive Wilderness Skills Applied 8:29  38,625 Views
ischnura

LINK: http://youtu.be/ILIZ6nmGeaE 
...
From noprpblemo2 -

primitive skills  4:53   2,191 Views
catawba7cherokee

LINK: http://youtu.be/_DJi4haGDSw
...

Yowbarb

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Re: Old American Skills for Primitive Living
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2011, 08:11:28 AM »
Echoes In Time Primitive Skills   7:52   9,983 Views

LINK: http://youtu.be/t473l-Nz0ps

Uploaded by UGROOK06 on Nov 27, 2008

A camp where they teach flint knapping, skin tanning, weaving, blacksmithing and many more early learning skills. Prepare to survive the end of civilization.
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1998 Living Outside Documentary - Featuring Cody Lundin
5:48  84,711 Views

LINK: http://youtu.be/4TQgRO6a-8w

Uploaded by abodudeman on May 29, 2008

Living Outside - Featuring Cody Lundin
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Yowbarb

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Re: Old American Skills for Primitive Living
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2012, 11:00:32 AM »
http://www.namb.net/survival/

Last Frontier Survival Teaching Guide
 
These lesson plans guide the leader in how to use the Last Frontier Survival Manual in order to teach young people basic survival skills ....


Download the Last Frontier Survival Teaching Guide >>

Download the Last Frontier Survival Manual

http://www.namb.net/survival/  download on this page...

 

Yowbarb

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Re: Old American Skills for Primitive Living
« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2012, 11:11:29 AM »
http://readynutrition.com/resources/pioneer-living-magazine-back-to-the-basics-series_04022010/

Pioneer Living Magazine: Back to the Basics Series

Tess Pennington
Ready Nutrition
February 2010


[ Yowbarb Note: Just an example or two of what is on the site. Please see articles and illustrations at page]
HOMESTEADING
http://readynutrition.com/resources/category/homestead/


Off-Grid Laundry  http://readynutrition.com/resources/off-grid-laundry_09112012/

Have you ever tried doing your laundry by hand? Learn these tips and tricks on laundering your clothes off-grid.

Article originally posted at
Girls Gone North  ( http://girlsgonenorth.blogspot.ca/2012/11/off-grid-laundry )
 
In my quest to learn off-grid skills, the most recent experiment has been off-grid laundry.  Like nearly every other skill that sounds fairly simple in theory, there is a lot more to it than I previously thought.  My first few efforts ended up with me chucking less-than fresh laundry into a basket and heading to the laundromat to rewash it.
 
After a couple of months of attempts, I feel like I finally have a handle on it. This is a step-by-step guide to doing laundry by hand.
 
First, gather your supplies.
 •Laundry soap of choice (I use a liquid)
 •Borax
 •Baking Soda
 •Hydrogen Peroxide
 •Sturdy scrub brush
 •Small bucket (I use a clean plastic kitty litter bucket)
 •Good quality janitor’s mop bucket with a press wringer
 •Drying rack and clothespins (or method of choice)
 
1.) Put your laundry in to soak.  I often put laundry in the tub at night to soak for the next 10 hours in a tub of soapy water with Borax. You only need enough water to cover the laundry.
 



You may be surprised at how dirty the water is when you get up in the morning. I never realized how much dirt got into the fabric of my clothing as I go about my daily chores at the woodpile, feeding pets, walking the dog, cleaning and cooking.  See how murky the water is?
 


2. )Then, in the morning, I leave  the laundry in the tub when I shower (think of the I Love Lucy scene where they’re stomping grapes!)  This takes the place of the “agitation” cycle in an electric washing machine.  Drain the tub when you’re finished.
 
3.) Next, I scrub the laundry.  I use a scrub brush and a combination of laundry soap and baking soda.  This is where an old fashioned washboard would come in handy, but for now, I just use the bottom of the bath tub.  Pay special attention to “dirty” areas: around collars, underarms, knees, soiled kitchen linens, socks and undergarments.
 


I’ve learned that no matter how hard I scrub, nothing short of a tub full of bleach water gets our white socks looking clean, even though in terms of “sanitation” they are very clean.  Thus, I’m investing in black socks for the stockpile should a long-term electrical disaster ever take place.
 
3.) Some items require a bit more soaking.  This week I had soaked up a coffee spill with a white towel, for example, plus there were a couple of other items with stains.  I use homemade “oxy-clean” in my bucket for this.  1/8 cup each of baking soda, hydrogen peroxide and laundry soap and approximately a liter of hot water.
 


4.) Fill your tub again with hot water. Some people add more laundry soap here but I feel like the soap on the clothing from scrubbing it is sufficient for this time around.  I have a broom handle that I use for stirring the laundry around, but there are items that look similar to a toilet plunger designed specifically for the purpose of agitating laundry.  Then allow it to soak again.  I usually leave it for a couple of hours while I do other things.  After the first hour, dump your items soaking in the bucket into the big tub, along with the liquid in the bucket, and give it another stir.
 


5.)  Now it’s time to rinse.  Rinse your soaking bucket and drain the tub. Gently squeeze out the clothing items and let that water run down the drain as well. Add clean water to the tub, just enough to cover the laundry again.   Rinse each item by swishing it vigorously through the water, then place it in the bucket that you soaked items in.
 
6.) Pour a bucket full of rinsed laundry into the wringer section of your mop bucket. The water will go right through. I use a bucket for transferring the laundry because it keeps both me and my floor dry.
 



7.)  Use the wringer function on your bucket to get as much water out of the clothing as possible.  Adjust the clothing in the wringer and then wring it out again.  I find that after this I can still often wring a little bit of water out by hand.  This, to me, is the most difficult part of off-grid laundry.  It’s physically hard work, the wet clothes can be heavy and it takes a toll on your hands to wring out the laundry as tightly as possible. Invest in the best quality bucket you can afford. I bought a cheap one first and it broke after a half dozen loads of laundry. Consider this a tool that will take a beating. My bucket is an industrial quality janitor’s bucket.
 



8.)  As each item is wrung out, place it in another container while you finish wringing out the rest of the laundry. I use my bathroom sink for this.
 


9.)  No matter how well you wring out your laundry, it’s still going to drip for hours.  I learned a little tip from Lizzie Bennett at Medically Speaking:  Place your drying rack in the bathtub for a few hours!  This keeps your floors dry and keeps your home from becoming excessively moist.  In the UK, few people have driers, so most air dry their clothing indoors in the bad weather.
 
I usually leave the clothing on the rack in the tub overnight and then the next day I move it outside, weather permitting, or indoors  by the woodstove.


I do a load of laundry this way every other day.  It is sweet-smelling and fresh.  It’s a lot of work and I’m very much looking forward to the arrival of my electric washing machine in another week or so.
 
This is a good skill to learn now, because in a down-grid situation, when water could be limited for a multitude of reasons, you don’t want to waste your supplies and still have laundry that isn’t very clean.
 
The mental aspect of being able to don fresh clean clothing in the aftermath of a disaster cannot be underestimated.  Clean clothing is a sign of normalcy, and even more importantly, good hygiene will help prevent the spread of disease.
 
I store my laundry supplies all together in the janitor’s bucket which wheels into my linen closet. In a down grid situation, all of the laundry water could potentially be reused for various purposes: cleaning, flushing, watering plants (only with the rinse water).
 
 
Article originally posted at Girls Gone North




enlightenme

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Re: Old American Skills for Primitive Living
« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2012, 05:31:35 PM »
Excellent article and tips Barb, Thanks!  Though I must say that's one chore I truly hope we will not end up having to do by hand. ;D

JKB

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Re: Old American Skills for Primitive Living
« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2012, 02:00:01 AM »
Hello all,
 
This is way off of the laundry topic, but, for some reason, I felt compelled to post this.  It may seem trivial at first, but, if you have not done so, start doing this experiment and training yourself to get used to it.  I have had a devil of a time trying to get my wife to "swim with the current" on this one, but, what else is new?  Ha ha.
 
Anyway, I don't know if they teach this in the other branches of the military or not, but it is common knowledge in the Marine Corps, and that is...  getting (and keeping) your night vision...
 
Have you ever noticed that if you are in the dark for 30 minutes or more, you can suddenly see quite well?  It happens to be true, and I'm not talking about night vision goggles, I mean your own two eyes.  Nowdays, most military units utilize night vision devices when out on patrol and you see film of this all of the time on television.  However, back in the day...  they taught us to "get our night vision," which merely means spending at least 30 minutes in the darkness before going out on patrol.
 
You will be amazed how well you can see in the dark, and I mean zero light, no moon, no glow sticks, no nothing.... just dark.  The trick, and it's not really a trick, is to spend a whole 30 minutes just sitting in the dark, before you get up and move around or do anything.  It takes that long for your eyes to adjust and for you to get used to your night vision.  Once you have it, you will be surprised...  You can see quite well, maybe not as well as a wolf or a coyote or an owl, but more than well enough to move about freely and recognize threats and dangers in the dark.  We rely on it and in fact, when we were in Kuwait and were miles away from any artificial light source that we chose not to use, we walked around just fine, in total darkness, way out in the desert and with no Moon, no anything...
 
The flip side to this is that once you have your night vision, all it takes to lose it is looking into a headlight or a flashlight or any bright light source, and... gone...  you just lost it.  That is why we use flashlights with red lenses on them, because that is the one color that will not kill your night vision.  Seriously.
 
Once you get used to this, you will feel more safe in the dark than you do in the light.  I call that an advantage.  I am slowly teaching this concept to my wife, but, it is a process...  She is a typical civilian and by that, I mean, a civilian will reach for a light switch out of habit because it is what they have always done, instant light, right?  Yeah, until the lights go out...   
 
Anyway, I will be chilling on the patio, in the dark, and she will come up and turn on the outside lights, "to see if I'm out there!!!"  This blinds me for a minute and I'm like, "What are you doing?  I'm just sitting here."  And she will say something like, "I just wanted to see if you're out here."  Well, of course, my thought is "then why didn't you just look?"  But, I can't expect her to have this down, as this is a habit that a person has to establish.
 
At any rate, I hope this was informational and that you will try it, because it works.  Even if you are camping...  The campfire is too bright to get your night vision.  You have to walk away in the dark for awhile to get it. 
 
Once you get used to this, you will not only love it but you will start to depend on it.  I hope it helps.  Peace.  See you in the dark!  JKB
You have to let it all go Neo.  Fear, doubt, and disbelief...  Free your mind.

enlightenme

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Re: Old American Skills for Primitive Living
« Reply #6 on: November 16, 2012, 03:03:06 AM »
Thanks JKB!  I always realized that sometimes I could see better in the dark than others, and knew it had something to do with my eyes "getting used to it", the weather, moon, etc., but never realized there was a time factor of 30 minutes involved.  How interesting...Can't wait to check it out!

Yowbarb

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Re: Old American Skills for Primitive Living
« Reply #7 on: November 16, 2012, 09:41:49 AM »
JKB thanks for the night vision tip and yes, this is certainly as important a skill as primitive
methods of doing laundry.  ;)
- Yowbarb

1969quartz0

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Re: Old American Skills for Primitive Living
« Reply #8 on: November 17, 2012, 04:10:31 PM »
I love info. on the old ways to do things we save books and print hard copies of so many things it would take a large vehicle to move them. But doing laundry by hand well not if I can help it being an electrician if I can move around I will find a way to make electricity I do not need a fancy washing machine or dryer when I move all that stays here. We bought two 40's Maytag's with the ringers on top and will use them at the cabin or here if we do not get there before all h--- brakes loose.

Yowbarb

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Re: Old American Skills for Primitive Living
« Reply #9 on: November 19, 2012, 10:33:47 AM »
I love info. on the old ways to do things we save books and print hard copies of so many things it would take a large vehicle to move them. But doing laundry by hand well not if I can help it being an electrician if I can move around I will find a way to make electricity I do not need a fancy washing machine or dryer when I move all that stays here. We bought two 40's Maytag's with the ringers on top and will use them at the cabin or here if we do not get there before all h--- brakes loose.

That's great - those who are handy with electricity and many other modern skills will bring
them forward, of course.  :)

Yowbarb

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Re: Old American Skills for Primitive Living
« Reply #11 on: January 08, 2014, 09:30:38 PM »
I don't see fire starting supplies or space blankets on that list...not sure why.

JKB

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Re: Old American Skills for Primitive Living
« Reply #12 on: January 12, 2014, 01:09:46 PM »
...or guns and ammo...   ;)
You have to let it all go Neo.  Fear, doubt, and disbelief...  Free your mind.

Yowbarb

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Re: Old American Skills for Primitive Living
« Reply #13 on: January 13, 2014, 06:37:59 AM »

Yowbarb

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Re: Old American Skills for Primitive Living
« Reply #14 on: January 23, 2014, 06:32:40 AM »
RE Root cellars
A video will be presented, as part of the Survival Summit (Jan 20-27th) 9 PST daily.

Date of root cellar video:  Saturday, January 26th 

Note: No link for it yet. The Summit publishes the links daily.

http://thesurvivalsummit.com/schedule-3/    Schedule for entire event.

Register at The Survival Summit. Free. Videos are good for 24 hours, beginning 0900 PST daily.