Author Topic: COLD Climates and the culture of survival  (Read 610 times)

Yowbarb

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COLD Climates and the culture of survival
« on: November 17, 2009, 10:05:10 AM »
You guys up there are legendary survivors.
http://www.hickerphoto.com/data/media/30/landscape_art_T3940.jpg
I would imagine both native peoples and more recent settlers will do pretty well at
figuring out how to survive the coming times.
Please share what you know, as the culture of survival has
already been developing with residents there over hundreds of years.
Of course, it's been thousands of years in some cases.
Native groups and native descendants please share your stories and legends of past survival
and ideas on what to do now.
Descendants of explorers, settlers, trappers, explorers craftsmen hunters - pickers of berries and bakers of pies, share what you know.
We will appreciate it.
http://www.polartrec.com/ptrecgallery/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=41522

Alaskan wild blueberry pie (Yumm!!) :


Thanks,
Yowbarb


http://www.brownbagchats.com/img/alaska.jpg

Warmer days a few months from now.

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« Last Edit: November 17, 2009, 10:08:55 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: COLD Climates and the culture of survival
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2009, 10:19:07 AM »
« Last Edit: January 27, 2011, 06:51:47 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: COLD Climates and the culture of survival
« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2010, 11:19:58 AM »

Yowbarb

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Re: COLD Climates and the culture of survival
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2011, 06:50:42 AM »
BBC Nature: Mega Tsunami - Alaskan Super Wave - Amazing Survival 3:53   2,892,858 Views

BBCWorldwide| August 18, 2008 |
Two survivors of a Mega Tsunami tell their stories of the day the 1/2km high wave hit Lituya Bay.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yN6EgMMrhdI

Yowbarb

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Re: COLD Climates and the culture of survival
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2011, 07:11:34 AM »
This is the info on the megasunami referred to in previous post, BBC video,
BBC Nature: Mega Tsunami - Evidence of Destruction 

- Yowbarb
...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megatsunami 
....

Geologists searching for oil in Alaska in 1953 observed that in Lituya Bay, mature tree growth did not extend to the shoreline as it did in many other bays in the region. Rather, there was a band of younger trees closer to the shore. Forestry workers, glaciologists, and geographers call the boundary between these bands a trim line. Trees just above the trim line showed severe scarring on their seaward side, whilst those from below the trim line did not. The scientists hypothesized that there had been an unusually large wave or waves in the deep inlet. Because this is a recently deglaciated fjord with steep slopes and crossed by a major fault, one possibility was a landslide-generated tsunami.[2]
 On 9 July 1958, an earthquake of magnitude 7.7 (on the Richter scale), caused 90 million tonnes of rock and ice to drop into the deep water at the head of Lituya Bay. The block fell almost vertically and hit the water with sufficient force to create a wave approximately 524 meters high (1,724 feet). Howard Ulrich and his son, Howard Jr. were in the bay in their fishing boat when they saw the wave. They both survived and reported that the wave carried their boat "over the trees" on one of the initial waves which washed them back into the bay, though the larger wave did not harm them a great lot. A similar tsunami out at sea could come tens of kilometers inland.
 This event and evidence of a potentially similar past event at the same location inspired the term megatsunami