Author Topic: GARDENING  (Read 11390 times)

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GARDENING
« on: April 03, 2010, 11:33:31 AM »
Hey... it's free, can't do better that that. This site has a lot of free downloads,, search and enjoy.
Survival Gardening

Yowbarb

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2010, 06:43:59 AM »
ICON thanks for putting this Topic here
and for the free download for Survival Gardening.
All The Best,

Yowbarb

Yowbarb

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2013, 02:26:54 PM »

SHTF & Prepping Central: Facebook page is https://www.facebook.com/SHTFPreps?hc_location=stream


101 Gardening Secrets Experts Never Tell You

 It's not to late to start gardening... Get the tips professionals don't want you to know

 See here>>
http://www.shtfpreparedness.com/101-gardening-secrets-experts-never-tell-you/

Convert from PDF to DOC and back again:

http://download.fromdoctopdf.com/index.jhtml?partner=Y6xdm003&gclid=CLenzp6RqLcCFQ-g4Aodb2cAMw 

Yowbarb

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2013, 08:45:59 AM »
http://www.sunset.com/garden/fruits-veggies/how-to-grow-veggies-in-pots-00400000012149/

How to grow vegetables in pots


All you need is a big container, potting soil, and a spot that gets six hours of sun. Here's how to get started

Lauren Bonar Swezey

Growing vegetables can bring out the farmer in you. You till the soil and tend the plants, then reap the rewards when the plants bear fruit.

Even if you don't have much sunny ground, you can still experience the pleasure of harvesting your own vine-ripened tomatoes and other crops. All you need is a generous-size container, good potting soil, and a suitable spot ― a patio, deck, or corner that gets at least six hours of full sun a day.

If you do have actual ground for growing, containers can still help you overcome problems like poorly drained soil, pests such as gophers, and soil-borne diseases such as fusarium wilt, nematodes, and verticillium wilt.

Also, since soil in pots warms up more quickly in spring than it does in the ground, you can get a tomato or pepper off to a faster start. And tall pots make it easier for gardeners with limited mobility to tend crops without kneeling or squatting.

Growing vegetables can bring out the farmer in you. You till the soil and tend the plants, then reap the rewards when the plants bear fruit.

Even if you don't have much sunny ground, you can still experience the pleasure of harvesting your own vine-ripened tomatoes and other crops. All you need is a generous-size container, good potting soil, and a suitable spot ― a patio, deck, or corner that gets at least six hours of full sun a day.

If you do have actual ground for growing, containers can still help you overcome problems like poorly drained soil, pests such as gophers, and soil-borne diseases such as fusarium wilt, nematodes, and verticillium wilt.

Also, since soil in pots warms up more quickly in spring than it does in the ground, you can get a tomato or pepper off to a faster start. And tall pots make it easier for gardeners with limited mobility to tend crops without kneeling or squatting.

http://www.sunset.com/garden/fruits-veggies/best-crops-for-pots-00400000012139/ The Best crops for Pots
« Last Edit: May 27, 2013, 08:59:08 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #4 on: May 27, 2013, 08:56:27 AM »
Continued from previous post, which has the article How to grow vegetables in pots
http://www.sunset.com/garden/fruits-veggies/how-to-grow-veggies-in-pots-00400000012149/

http://www.sunset.com/garden/fruits-veggies/best-crops-for-pots-00400000012139/

Best crops for Pots

Any vegetable that grows in the ground can be grown in a container. But some crops, such as corn and pumpkins, may not be worth the effort. You don't have to stick with so-called patio (dwarf) varieties. Most standard-size vegetables are suitable for container culture. For beans and carrots, plan to sow seeds directly in the soil-filled container. Grow other types of vegetables from seed, or purchase ready-to-plant s. Eggplants, peppers, and tomatoes started from seed take about eight weeks to develop seedlings ready for transplanting.

BEANS

Pot depth: 14-16 in.

Soil temperature (at planting time): At least 60°.

Spacing: Direct-sow seeds 2-3 in. apart.

Pole beans are more productive over the long run than bush beans (which produce their crop all at once). Train the 6- to 8-ft.-tall vines on a trellis or tepee made from bamboo poles. Try 'Blue Lake Pole', 'Helda' romano, or heirloom 'Kentucky Wonder'.

CARROTS

Pot depth: 9-14 in.

Soil temperature: At least 55°.

Spacing: Direct-sow seeds 1/2-1 in. apart; thin seedlings 1-2 in. apart.

Choose a deep pot for carrots with long roots, such as 'Nantes' half-long type (7 in. long). Shallower pots are adequate for shorter carrots such as 'Short 'n Sweet' or round ones like 'Thumbelina' (shown). Don't let the soil  dry out.

CUCUMBERS

Pot depth: 18 in.

Soil temperature: At least 70°.

Spacing: One plant per pot.

Bush types like 'Bush Champion' and disease-resistant 'Salad Bush' take up half the space of trailing types. 'Lemon' cuke (shown) also bears well on a trellis.

EGGPLANTS

Pot depth: 14-16 in.

Soil temperature: At least 70°.

Spacing: One or two plants per pot.

With their colorful fruits and attractive foliage, eggplants have outstanding ornamental value. Try 'Black Beauty', an American heirloom with bulbous, purple-black fruits, or 'Little Fingers' (shown), an Asian type with slim fruits.

PEPPERS

Pot depth: 14-16 in.

Soil temperature: At least 60°.

Spacing: One or two plants per pot.

Choose from an amazing array of colors, shapes, and heat levels, from mildly spicy 'Anaheim' to searing hot 'Thai Dragon'. Among sweet peppers, try 'Ariane' (shown), an orange bell, or 'Giant Marconi', a long, red one that's great for grilling.

POTATOES

Pot depth: 18 in.

Soil temperature: At least 45°.

Spacing: Plant tubers 6 in. apart.

Potatoes are productive if there's ample room for tubers to develop. Bury seed potatoes in an 8-in. layer of soil at the bottom of the pot. As plants grow, pile more soil up to the top set of leaves. Try small- to medium-size 'All Blue', 'Red Pontiac', or 'Yukon Gold'.

Pot depth: 18 in.

Soil temperature: At least 60°.

Spacing: One plant per pot.

Summer squash is more productive than winter squash. Grow compact varieties like 'Gold Rush' yellow zucchini, 'Spacemiser' green zucchini, or 'Sunburst' scallopini (shown).

TOMATOES

Pot depth: 18 in.

Soil temperature: At least 60°.

Spacing: One plant per pot.

Use small wire cages or stakes to support determinate types (2- to 3-ft.-tall varieties that produce their crop all at once); try 'Bush Celebrity'. Use sturdy 5-ft.-tall cages for indeterminate types (tall kinds that produce fruits all season) such as 'Early Girl.'

More:  Sunset's One-Block Feast:
http://www.sunset.com/food-wine/sunset-one-block-feast-00400000038787/






« Last Edit: June 04, 2013, 11:16:29 PM by Yowbarb »

enlightenme

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2014, 03:55:57 AM »
In previous years I loved us all being able to share our good time/bad luck stories of the gardening season, so I hope we can do that again this year!  ;D

I've gotten off to just a little bit of a late start for my zone for starting the indoor peppers, tomatoes, melons, etc.  I will have that mission accomplished and in their little starter packs on the window sills by next week!  It's always a great way to get over the winter gloom and get on into the spring fever mode for me.  And I could use a little bit of cheerfulness right about now.  Please everyone feel free to join in and let me know what you've been up to so far, etc.  Happy Gardening 2014 Everyone!!  ;D
« Last Edit: March 12, 2014, 05:46:28 AM by enlightenme »

enlightenme

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2014, 09:32:14 PM »
I am hoping to find my great sale at KMart again this year for the non GMO seeds.  For the past two years, I really made out great on the prices!  Even better than going to my favorite local distributor.  Their website is www.burpee.com  and if you just enter your zip code and go, you will find a wealth of information, as well as being able to order just about anything your heart may desire.  Another favorite website of mine  a very large local organic farm, one of the very first)  www.rodales.com
PS, I just checked the rodale site again, and hmmm, it sure seems quite a bit more commercialized than ever.  I will try to do a little more research on that for everyone.  I'll let you know if I find out anything more about Rodale's (Emmaus, PA)
Happy Gardening 2014 everyone!  *** Update, I just found that actual site I remember, http://rodaleinstitute.org/  That's the one, just disregard the first Rodale link. 

PS when I signed up for email specials on the burpee site, it automatically gave me a $10 coupon off any order $40 or more.  Not too shabby!!!
« Last Edit: March 16, 2014, 01:46:36 AM by enlightenme »

ilinda

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #7 on: March 16, 2014, 03:08:57 PM »
In previous years I loved us all being able to share our good time/bad luck stories of the gardening season, so I hope we can do that again this year!  ;D

I've gotten off to just a little bit of a late start for my zone for starting the indoor peppers, tomatoes, melons, etc.  I will have that mission accomplished and in their little starter packs on the window sills by next week!  It's always a great way to get over the winter gloom and get on into the spring fever mode for me.  And I could use a little bit of cheerfulness right about now.  Please everyone feel free to join in and let me know what you've been up to so far, etc.  Happy Gardening 2014 Everyone!!  ;D

This is the post I had been looking for and now found.   :-D)))
OK, I've only started a few things so far:  peppers, tomatoes, tomatillos, an unusual mulberry, and almonds.  Talked about the almonds in different post, so might mention the mulberry.  Was at friends house a few weeks ago and she pointed out a tree they have that is different in growth habit from usual mulberry trees.  Hers is shorter and branches are low enough that even a 5'3" person can walk under it and pick--no need for ladders or "cherry picker", etc.  She said the berries are larger, sweeter, and so plentiful that there's plenty for the birds and for them.  All along I had thought a mulberry is a mulberry.  Apparently not.  So I asked if I could get a few cuttings, and she was fine with it.  Brought them home, stuck them in potting soil, and now a few weeks later, have 5 little sticks with fattened buds that have partially opened and green is showing through.  This is as exciting as the almond seedlings.

While I continue to plant annuals such as squash, tomatoes, etc., I am trying to plant more and more perennials, thinking:  plant once, harvest yearly.  Much less work.  Have no idea what the future holds in the long term, but this is what we do.  As Marshall said, plan for what you love.

Anxious to hear what others are planting, especially after the brutal winter most of us have had in the Northern Hemisphere.

enlightenme

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #8 on: March 16, 2014, 04:27:50 PM »
Well, Hey, that's sounds like a pretty good start to me!  I just got the soil and pots so tomorrow I am going to start my tomatoes (early girl, big boy, beefsteak and also grape tomatoes if I can find those little grape ones, I really like those in salads!), peppers some sweet and hot , and melons.  It's supposed to snow again tomorrow, but only a dusting to an inch, so a great day to play with dirt and seeds indoors!   I do have a great sun porch that gets sun for most of the day, and my baby seedlings always do well there.  Sad to say, the garden plot is still under the snow, so it's going to be awhile I'm afraid until I can even possibly start to think about planting the onions, peas, etc.  I do really want to try to do a bunch more container gardening this year though, including baby carrots in big pots.  I hope it works out well.  I think it's great about the mulberry trees!  Good luck with that and the almonds!  By the way, what area/zone/ or state are you in? 

Yowbarb

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #9 on: March 16, 2014, 11:38:44 PM »
Well, Hey, that's sounds like a pretty good start to me!  I just got the soil and pots so tomorrow I am going to start my tomatoes (early girl, big boy, beefsteak and also grape tomatoes if I can find those little grape ones, I really like those in salads!), peppers some sweet and hot , and melons.  It's supposed to snow again tomorrow, but only a dusting to an inch, so a great day to play with dirt and seeds indoors!   I do have a great sun porch that gets sun for most of the day, and my baby seedlings always do well there.  Sad to say, the garden plot is still under the snow, so it's going to be awhile I'm afraid until I can even possibly start to think about planting the onions, peas, etc.  I do really want to try to do a bunch more container gardening this year though, including baby carrots in big pots.  I hope it works out well.  I think it's great about the mulberry trees!  Good luck with that and the almonds!  By the way, what area/zone/ or state are you in?

Enlightenme what a great post!
Inspirational.  :)

Yowbarb

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #10 on: March 16, 2014, 11:42:05 PM »
Moderator pbutter shared this on Facebook. I really like this.

 :)

ilinda

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #11 on: March 17, 2014, 06:16:19 AM »
Well, Hey, that's sounds like a pretty good start to me!  I just got the soil and pots so tomorrow I am going to start my tomatoes (early girl, big boy, beefsteak and also grape tomatoes if I can find those little grape ones, I really like those in salads!), peppers some sweet and hot , and melons.  It's supposed to snow again tomorrow, but only a dusting to an inch, so a great day to play with dirt and seeds indoors!   I do have a great sun porch that gets sun for most of the day, and my baby seedlings always do well there.  Sad to say, the garden plot is still under the snow, so it's going to be awhile I'm afraid until I can even possibly start to think about planting the onions, peas, etc.  I do really want to try to do a bunch more container gardening this year though, including baby carrots in big pots.  I hope it works out well.  I think it's great about the mulberry trees!  Good luck with that and the almonds!  By the way, what area/zone/ or state are you in?

Am in Missouri's Ozarks, specifically the Saint Francois Mountains.  Although we're supposedly in zone (?6?) I feel we're in a tiny micro-climate because we're in a small valley, surrounded on all sides by mountaintops/hilltops, and when an inversion settles, it just sits there.  We had -30 deg. F. this winter, and the last time that happened, nobody believed me.  So this time  I photographed the thermometer.  Problem is, as I stood close to it, my breath caused it to rise one degree 'up" to -29 deg. F.  We suspect it got even colder that night because it was 30 below when hubby checked it at midnight.  Then 7 hours later it was 30 below when I got up.  A friend said weather service announced the coldest time during that night was 4 AM, which said to me that it probably got colder until around 4 AM, then began to rise, and was still rising when I photographed it at 7 AM.

Am anxious to hear how your baby carrots in pots do.  I've tried to grow carrots several times, but do not have good luck.  Not sure why, except they do like sandy soil, and this stuff is pretty clayey here.  I did agree to do an evaluation-grow-out for SSE, Seed Savers Exchange, this year, with carrots of several varieties.  I just might order some other carrot seeds to also compare.  Am thinking of ordering the "Oxheart" variety.  One really nice thing about carrots is their storage life.

P.S. the pic of the thermometer is dark, as room light was off, so look closely.

ilinda

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #12 on: March 18, 2014, 05:15:32 AM »
In previous years I loved us all being able to share our good time/bad luck stories of the gardening season, so I hope we can do that again this year!  ;D

I've gotten off to just a little bit of a late start for my zone for starting the indoor peppers, tomatoes, melons, etc.  I will have that mission accomplished and in their little starter packs on the window sills by next week!  It's always a great way to get over the winter gloom and get on into the spring fever mode for me.  And I could use a little bit of cheerfulness right about now.  Please everyone feel free to join in and let me know what you've been up to so far, etc.  Happy Gardening 2014 Everyone!!  ;D

Did you say you're in Ohio?  If so, which part of the state?

enlightenme

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #13 on: March 18, 2014, 06:16:17 AM »
In previous years I loved us all being able to share our good time/bad luck stories of the gardening season, so I hope we can do that again this year!  ;D

I've gotten off to just a little bit of a late start for my zone for starting the indoor peppers, tomatoes, melons, etc.  I will have that mission accomplished and in their little starter packs on the window sills by next week!  It's always a great way to get over the winter gloom and get on into the spring fever mode for me.  And I could use a little bit of cheerfulness right about now.  Please everyone feel free to join in and let me know what you've been up to so far, etc.  Happy Gardening 2014 Everyone!!  ;D



Did you say you're in Ohio?  If so, which part of the state?

Nope, I am in northeastern PA, well about two hours north of Philadelphia and two hours west of NYC, in the foothills of the Poconos and the Appalachian Mountains.  So, our growing season here can be a bit challenging!!  And I must admit, I never seem to have quite enough time to devote to it as I want or need to, with everything else I have going on.  My candle/antique business has gotten to the point where it is now so much more than just a 40 hr a week job, that if I ever do really start to make some decent money with it  ;D ;D , I am going to hire some real help!!! 
« Last Edit: March 18, 2014, 06:42:37 AM by enlightenme »

ilinda

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #14 on: March 22, 2014, 06:31:02 AM »
I tried to post two pictures of parsnips, one being RAW format, and the other being S3 suitable for email format, but after waiting for than 5 minutes, with no changes, it is obviously a problem.  Now to sort it all out.  I suspect the RAW format is larger.  Will work on this.

The pics I tried to post showed firm, crisp parsnips I dug a couple of days ago for the goats.  The parsnips sat in the ground all winter, during which the night time temp's dropped to -30 deg. F one night, and -10 and -20 or so a number of other nights, making it a very long and very cold winter, as many others experienced in the eastern and central U. S. and no doubt elsewhere this past winter.

The parsnips is very hardy, and probably the most hardy crop I know, that does not seem to suffer the extreme temperature, as most other root crops would.  Maybe I can figure out how to post the pics later.