Author Topic: GARDENING  (Read 12312 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #45 on: October 17, 2015, 02:36:47 AM »
http://gogardenclub.com/how-to-build-a-raised-flower-bed/index.html

How To Build A Raised Flower Bed

Posted in Vegetables & Herbs By EducationalGardens On October 28, 2014
Even if a particular yard doesn’t seem suitable for gardening, there’s still an opportunity to successfully grow vegetables in it. Perhaps it has a heavy clay soil that’s hard to work. It could be that there are too many rocks in it, making it a chore to till it. Another deterrent to a garden is that the yard itself is on too steep of an angle. One good solution to any of these problems is a raised garden bed. This simple structure can provide a level area for gardening. The only thing that’s really needed is a spot in the yard that receives enough sunlight. Six hours is usually the minimum for most vegetables.

With a location selected, the next step is deciding what to use for bed construction. There are kits available. Many of them use plastic parts that aren’t very strong. They can also be expensive because of all the manufactured pieces. Building a raised garden bed from scratch can often be more affordable. It’s possible to use bricks, concrete paving blocks, or stone. This approach can be done without mortar, and it permits the gardener a lot of flexibility in the shape of the raised bed.

Another choice, probably the most popular, is lumber. This technique requires some sawing and hammering or drilling. If you go with this method, the lumber needs to be untreated cedar. Other types of wood will either rot, be too hard to work with, or contain harmful chemicals.

After deciding on the building material, a size and shape have to be determined for the bed. This is needed for preparing the surface. Whether wood or masonry are used, a four or five foot square layout is the simplest design to use. It’s easy to make the measurements, and square structures in this size range allow easy access to any spot within the frame. The actual ground preparation begins with marking out the bed’s dimensions in the yard.

Placing stakes at each corner allows a string to be looped around them. This creates an outline that’s used as a guide for removing the turf from the area. The turf is removed with a shovel by cutting it in sections. When doing this, cut out an extra inch or two beyond the string outline. Next, the ground needs to be leveled. If there is a severe incline to the property, dirt needs to be dug from the high end to achieve this. It’s helpful to aerate the exposed soil at this time. This supplies the vegetables with air to their roots later on.

The last step to preparing the ground is putting down a weed barrier and wire mesh. These two items should completely cover the area of exposed dirt. Weed seeds and roots can be hiding in the ground. A weed barrier keeps them from colonizing the raised bed. The wire mesh is used to keep gophers, voles, and other potential garden pests from tunneling underneath the bed.

Constructing the walls of the bed comes next. If it’s done with masonry, it’s important to make the walls thick enough to support the outward pressure of the soil within the bed. Interlocking landscape blocks make this easy. Bricks or stones, on the other hand, need to be staggered to create enough strength. If lumber is used, it’s important to take its thickness into account when measuring the lengths to cut. Standard lumber is one and a half inches thick. A raised bed will work best with wood planks that are ten to twelve inches wide. The wooden frame can be held together with either nails or screws. Screws provide a stronger bond.

The last step is filling the raised bed with a good soil mixture. There needs to be a blend of gardening soil, which contains the nutrients, and peat moss, which keeps the soil loose. If too much or too little peat moss is used, the soil will either become compacted or so loose that it’s unstable and won’t hold the plants upright. The exact mix of the soil can be adjusted to accommodate the particular needs of the plants. With the soil in place, the only thing left is the actual planting.

david

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #46 on: January 28, 2016, 04:46:01 AM »
Gardening WOW my best area. You know the best thing I learned in 2015 are that herbs grow very well in many areas had a problem with some of the tomato's and peppers. Underground crop did very well. Back to my tomato's the one's that were shaded did better. Maybe its what they spay in the air. So this year I will get the top rail of fences and bend them to make easy type green house over them but not complete the covering to cover most of the area to try to prevent hurting my best plants.   

Yowbarb

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #47 on: January 28, 2016, 09:49:20 AM »
Gardening WOW my best area. You know the best thing I learned in 2015 are that herbs grow very well in many areas had a problem with some of the tomato's and peppers. Underground crop did very well. Back to my tomato's the one's that were shaded did better. Maybe its what they spay in the air. So this year I will get the top rail of fences and bend them to make easy type green house over them but not complete the covering to cover most of the area to try to prevent hurting my best plants.

David it's good to see you here in this topic. Are you by any chance also interested in led and hydroponics, various forms of cultivation in shelters etc. Ham radio? Faraday? Protection for electronics?
I sent you a message, if you are interested, you are needed in the Category: OFF-THE-GRID, EMPs, etc.
All The Best,
Barb Townsend

ilinda

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #48 on: January 28, 2016, 04:15:06 PM »
Gardening WOW my best area. You know the best thing I learned in 2015 are that herbs grow very well in many areas had a problem with some of the tomato's and peppers. Underground crop did very well. Back to my tomato's the one's that were shaded did better. Maybe its what they spay in the air. So this year I will get the top rail of fences and bend them to make easy type green house over them but not complete the covering to cover most of the area to try to prevent hurting my best plants.

David it's good to see you here in this topic. Are you by any chance also interested in led and hydroponics, various forms of cultivation in shelters etc. Ham radio? Faraday? Protection for electronics?
I sent you a message, if you are interested, you are needed in the Category: OFF-THE-GRID, EMPs, etc.
All The Best,
Barb Townsend
I'm interested in shortwave radio.  We have an old SW set that appears to be from the 1970's, probably one of the earliest solid state receivers.  I have the antenna wire, but have never connected it up to check it out.  A friend who recently received her Technician's license or whatever they call it (she has her call letters) told me to check out 440.  I assume she means 440 HZ, or did she mean 440 KHz?  I'm showing my total ignorance of SW radio.

We had a nifty brand new $100 radio that had SW, FM, AM capabilities, with three power options:  AC/DC using AA batteries, or a windup feature, which made the radio billed as "Never Needs Batteries".  Well that was a total lie.  What these liars don't tell you is that the wind-up/crank does power the unit, but it is charging a sealed, non-replacable internal battery, and when that internal battery dies, you either have to use AC or AA batteries, and if you're "in the field" you must have a steady and continuous supply of store-bought batteries. 

Problem is many folks buy these radios for use "in the field" and in many scanarios one can imagine, there will be no drug store open that one can just run to, to get replacement batteries!  So, be forewarned if you buy one of these wind-up radios.

Another complaint about our so-called nifty windup radio, the built-in antenna is so wimpy that we cannot get even the strongest AM or FM station in our area, plus SW didn't come in either.  So we have a light-weight doorstop.

Back to the old, heavy-duty SW unit....

Yowbarb

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #49 on: March 20, 2016, 11:28:17 PM »
ilinda - belated reply to your reply. :)
You probably already did post in the Ham Radio & Other Communications Topic.
(I changed the name - and moved it to the new Board, Ham Radio etc.
See you there. :)

Yowbarb

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #50 on: March 20, 2016, 11:50:31 PM »
Yowbarb Note:
This site seems to have a wealth of information on food growing, including permaculture. I will be posting the permaculture articles mainly in the permaculture Topic. An example of one article is posted below.

http://thegrownetwork.com/category/edible-landscapes/food-forests-edible-landscapes/

The Grow Network

Create an Inexpensive Orchard with Bare Root Fruit Trees 

Michael Ford
January 18, 2016

Bare root trees are young trees that are removed from the soil during their winter dormancy, so that the trees' roots are exposed. This is done to make packaging and shipping easier and cheaper, and it's a popular way to market fruit trees like apples, pears, peaches, plums, cherries, figs, pomegranates, and various nuts and berries.

Half Price Fruit Trees, Anyone?

When you buy bare root trees, you can often get fruit trees for about 50% of the cost of the same size trees if they were shipped in a pot. Half-off fruit trees, anyone? Now's the time!

Bare root fruit trees are typically only available for a few months in the middle of winter. The trees need to have their roots placed back in the soil before they come out of dormancy and begin to bud out for the spring.

You can often fit a dwarf or semi-dwarf fruit tree into a pretty small space, and you can keep the tree even smaller with careful pruning. So, take a stroll around your property and see if there's room to squeeze in a new fruit tree. You might be able to add a significant food source to your yard for less than $50...

If you're lucky, you might find bare root fruit trees at a local nursery, garden center, or farm supply store. They should only have trees available that are appropriate for your area, so the hardest part of shopping is already done for you. If you can't find them locally, you can always buy online - although the shipping costs can take a bite out of the overall savings.

Things to Consider for Bare Root Fruit Trees

Chill Hours

Chill hours are the number of hours that elapse while the temperature is between 32 F and 45 F. Some trees won't flower until an approximate number of chill hours have elapsed. The best trees for your area are the trees whose chill hour requirements match the average chill hours for your area.

• If you have a tree that requires 400 chill hours in a winter that only provides 200 chill hours, the tree probably won't flower that year.
 • If you have a tree that requires 400 chill hours in a winter that provides 800 chill hours, the tree will likely flower prematurely, and the blooms will freeze and fall off.

Pollination Requirements

Make sure that your fruit tree's pollination requirements are met. Many fruit trees won't bear good fruit without another tree nearby as a pollen source. Some trees will produce bigger and better fruit when pollinated by another specific variety of tree. If you only have room for one tree, make sure the tree you select is self-fertile. Also find out if your tree requires a 3rd party pollinator, like bees, or if it's just pollinated by the wind.

Start Small and Scale

Don't bite off more than you can chew. Fruit trees require a little more maintenance than your average landscape tree. At a minimum you'll probably need to spray once a year, prune once a year, and fertilize twice a year. Depending on the pests and diseases that are prevalent in your area, more spraying might be necessary. Start with a tree or two and get a feel for it before you commit to more maintenance work than you really want.

[Prune Your Fruit Trees Now for a Great Harvest Later]
http://thegrownetwork.com/prune-your-fruit-trees-now-for-a-great-harvest-later/

If you're not sure how to plant a bare root tree - don't worry about it - it's super simple. Here's a video where you can see a bare root tree planted by Theresa Knutson, a horticulturalist at Raintree Nursery in Morton, WA: 
How To Plant Your New Fruit Tree https://youtu.be/9XQRaB3C1bA

Thanks to Raintree Nursery for the nifty video. 

Yowbarb

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #51 on: March 21, 2016, 12:10:33 AM »
Yowbarb Note: Here's more info on the number of "chill hours" needed to grown fruits, nuts, etc. Info is from Raintree Nursery 391 Butts Road  Morton, WA 98356  (800) 391-8892
The Chill Map is in my previous post.
...
http://www.raintreenursery.com/Chill_Hours.html

The chill hour map is a result of research done at the University of Maryland. Use the map to estimate the chill hours for your area. Chill hours are roughly the number of hours between the temperatures of 32-45 degrees fahrenheit. Winter hours above 60 degrees are subtracted from the totals.

The idea is that a deciduous plant goes dormant in the cold winter to protect itself from the cold. The plant needs to stay dormant while the weather is freezing and then know how soon after it gets above freezing it can safely start growing. It must do it late enough so it doesn't get frozen back by a late frost but early enough so it can get a full season of growth and fruiting in before it must go dormant for the next year. The plant has a process, refined over millenia of evolution that tells it when to start growing in the spring and that process accounts for the amount of above freezing temperature (chilling hours) it needs.

Of course when we play with mother nature and grow plants in climates where they are not native, we run into lots of problems and this is one of them.

Yowbarb

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #52 on: March 21, 2016, 12:17:42 AM »
I'm also posting this somewhere in the Southwest Board.

http://thegrownetwork.com/a-perennial-food-guild-for-the-arid-american-southwest/

Socrates

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #53 on: July 23, 2016, 08:06:36 PM »
The Groasis newsletter; follow the links for Waterboxx and Growboxx to view YouTube vids on them.

Today we have great news for you!
 
In 2003 we started developing the Groasis Ecological Water Saving Technology. Our Technology is an integrated water saving technology which consists of a range of complementary inventions that can be used together or individually: harvesting rain water by building terraces, automated digging of planting holes, fertilizing with mycorrhizae, tree protection against animals and of course the Waterboxx® plant cocoon, referred to by some as “the Magic Box”.
 
In 2010 we started developing a biodegradable plant cocoon and we filed the first patents in 2011. In 2012 we planted over 8,000 biodegradable plant cocoons (made from recycled paper pulp) in 16 countries. Our YouTube channel contains excellent videos about these pilots, which have led to further perfection of the design and materials used.
 
After 13 years of hard work, including 5 years of research and testing to develop the ultimate biodegradable paper pulp box, we are very happy to introduce our amazing break through invention: the Growboxx® plant cocoon. The Growboxx® plant cocoon revolutionizes rural agriculture and ecosystem restoration because it offers a high tech solution for a price that is lower than traditional planting and irrigation methods. It also uses over 90% less water than these traditional methods, and results from our pilots indicate that it leads to survival rates in excess of 90%.
 
Today we can announce the first two orders that our Mexican partner Legado Verde received for our ground-breaking technology: the Mexican state of Baja California bought one million Growboxxes for two amazing projects. This marks the start of global ecosystem restoration based on our “high tech-low cost” Groasis Ecological Water Saving Technology.
 
In the coming decades all countries that suffer from erosion, climate change and drought will be able to restore their degraded land at low costs, whilst producing more food and reducing their water use by 90%. You can read the announcement of the Government of the State of Baja California below.
 
In this newsletter I, Pieter Hoff, include a personal appeal for your support and help.
 
If you want the world to be green and to increase food production in eroded countries, then I ask you to support us by spreading our message worldwide. Please watch the video of the amazing Growboxx® plant cocoon and if you think the world needs this invention, then share our message with all the people you know: friends, family, business relations, institutes. Now is the time to act!
« Last Edit: July 23, 2016, 08:29:10 PM by Socrates »
survival database
location, civilisation reboot, PERMACULTURE, postcataclysmic soil, Growing Soil 1.01

R.R. Book

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Re: GARDENING: potato gardening
« Reply #54 on: May 29, 2017, 08:31:15 AM »
Wanted to continue the topic of growing potatoes off of the SEED site, so that other aspects of it could be discussed.

 
Quote
"Butte" is a somewhat rare russett that has "20% more protein and 58% more vitamin C" than other cultivars, according to Wikipedia.  It is resistant to late blight and nematodes, but vulnerable to bacterial Verticillium wilt.  Seems to be sold out everywhere except places like Etsy.

So my query is this:  If the "Butte" potato cultivar is such a fine potential source of vegan protein for the aftertime, as well as a good source of C, how can we amend our horticultural practices in order to help the plants not succumb to Verticillium?

Some ideas for small homesteaders without space to rotate beds:
1. Alter the pH. The old advice for growing potatoes called for "slightly" acid soil pH of around 6.  Cornell University is now advising that potato soil pH be much lower, as low as 4.8, in the range of acidic blueberry soil ( http://www.gardening.cornell.edu/homegardening/scenec6be.html ).  A rainy season will wash alkaline minerals out of the soil and acidify it, whereas a dry environment will concentrate alkaline minerals.  Amendments might include diluted vinegar solution of 2T/gallon of water.  Powdered vinegar can be stored longer than liquid, and is available for around $5/pound.

2. Reconsider what we define as being "soil."  Planting potato seed in chopped leaves, peat moss, anything to loosen up the planting medium and aerate it will help to break the cycle of disease.

3. Allow potatoes to go through periods of drought by not irrigating. Potatoes prefer to be grown a little on the drier side, and excess moisture breeds bacteria.

4. Add colloidal silver to the planting hole in small amounts.

5. Or solarize the plot with black plastic covering in late winter/early spring

6. Conversely or subsequently, add old milk (including milk made from storage powder) for probiotics.  Or how about Socrates' idea of mead from honey for probiotics?

7. If adding wood ash for nutrients, add more vinegar than suggested above, or use it more often. Same with lime/calcium carbonate.  The carbon content of both will also help to purify soil.

8. Encourage "Butte" to crossbreed with "Sierra" to increase natural verticillium resistance ( http://daughterofthesoil.blogspot.com/2010/06/how-to-breed-your-own-potatoes.html )

Other ideas?
« Last Edit: May 29, 2017, 08:47:56 AM by R.R. Book »

ilinda

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Re: GARDENING: potato gardening
« Reply #55 on: May 29, 2017, 05:27:36 PM »
Wanted to continue the topic of growing potatoes off of the SEED site, so that other aspects of it could be discussed.

 
Quote
"Butte" is a somewhat rare russett that has "20% more protein and 58% more vitamin C" than other cultivars, according to Wikipedia.  It is resistant to late blight and nematodes, but vulnerable to bacterial Verticillium wilt.  Seems to be sold out everywhere except places like Etsy.

So my query is this:  If the "Butte" potato cultivar is such a fine potential source of vegan protein for the aftertime, as well as a good source of C, how can we amend our horticultural practices in order to help the plants not succumb to Verticillium?

Some ideas for small homesteaders without space to rotate beds:
1. Alter the pH. The old advice for growing potatoes called for "slightly" acid soil pH of around 6.  Cornell University is now advising that potato soil pH be much lower, as low as 4.8, in the range of acidic blueberry soil ( http://www.gardening.cornell.edu/homegardening/scenec6be.html ).  A rainy season will wash alkaline minerals out of the soil and acidify it, whereas a dry environment will concentrate alkaline minerals.  Amendments might include diluted vinegar solution of 2T/gallon of water.  Powdered vinegar can be stored longer than liquid, and is available for around $5/pound.

2. Reconsider what we define as being "soil."  Planting potato seed in chopped leaves, peat moss, anything to loosen up the planting medium and aerate it will help to break the cycle of disease.

3. Allow potatoes to go through periods of drought by not irrigating. Potatoes prefer to be grown a little on the drier side, and excess moisture breeds bacteria.

4. Add colloidal silver to the planting hole in small amounts.

5. Or solarize the plot with black plastic covering in late winter/early spring

6. Conversely or subsequently, add old milk (including milk made from storage powder) for probiotics.  Or how about Socrates' idea of mead from honey for probiotics?

7. If adding wood ash for nutrients, add more vinegar than suggested above, or use it more often. Same with lime/calcium carbonate.  The carbon content of both will also help to purify soil.

8. Encourage "Butte" to crossbreed with "Sierra" to increase natural verticillium resistance ( http://daughterofthesoil.blogspot.com/2010/06/how-to-breed-your-own-potatoes.html )

Other ideas?
One way (they say) to reduce chances of your seed potatoes harboring fungi or other undesirables, is to mist them (before planting) with hydrogen peroxide.

Also, I have never, ever watered potatoes.  They're mostly water, so why add water to water?  Friends will occasionally say their potatoes rotted in a given year, and they do water them, as they casually mention here and there, so I suspect there may be a connection.

I think I've read that  some Native peoples planted potatoes in big piles of seaweed, so using leaves and other mateials makes sense, as we've grown potatoes many times in nothing but old hay.  It looks counterintuitive, but if it's not a drought year, potatoes grow quite well in thick old piles of hay.  It's best if the old hay has been kept dry prior to planting, as that way it's thick and fluffy at planting time.

R.R. Book

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #56 on: May 29, 2017, 06:52:28 PM »
Quote
One way (they say) to reduce chances of your seed potatoes harboring fungi or other undesirables, is to mist them (before planting) with hydrogen peroxide.

What a great idea Ilinda - peroxide is one more supply to stock for the aftertime that I hadn't thought of, especially if it serves a dual purpose!

Yowbarb

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #57 on: October 19, 2017, 01:09:06 PM »
RR and ilinda: I wonder where to get a bulk supply of the hydrogen peroxide. Has so many medical uses and now,
finding out how useful it will be in the food production process. :)

ilinda

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #58 on: October 21, 2017, 05:33:41 PM »
RR and ilinda: I wonder where to get a bulk supply of the hydrogen peroxide. Has so many medical uses and now,
finding out how useful it will be in the food production process. :)
The last time I bought the high potency (? 32%?) it went "flat" while stored in the fridge.  So have not bought any since then.

Yowbarb

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Re: GARDENING
« Reply #59 on: November 07, 2017, 10:39:26 PM »
RR and ilinda: I wonder where to get a bulk supply of the hydrogen peroxide. Has so many medical uses and now,
finding out how useful it will be in the food production process. :)
The last time I bought the high potency (? 32%?) it went "flat" while stored in the fridge.  So have not bought any since then.

Thnkx.