Author Topic: SEEDS, started by Yowbarb 2010  (Read 23752 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: SEEDS, started by Yowbarb 2010
« Reply #15 on: May 03, 2010, 11:36:51 AM »
Jung Seed Company  - Randolph Wisconsin has 1/4 pound bags of heirloom squah, corn, beans, beets and turnips on the shelf in thier store... I am sure they have a website.

www.willhiteseed.com    I picked up a big pile of seeds from these guys.  Seem to have a nice supply in their catalog.

Prairiesage07, thanks for posting this site,
Yowbarb

mjoy

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Re: SEEDS, started by Yowbarb 2010
« Reply #16 on: July 03, 2010, 02:53:51 AM »
I recently read a very, very informative book and among other things it talks about seeds and how to prepare them for planting.  I did what was suggested and the changes are profound.  First, the book is the first of a series of 9 books by a Russian, Vladimir Megre.  The book I am referring to is his first book, called; ANASTASIA.  I have noticed that for the very first time I have this emotional and deep connection with my garden that I have not had throughout all the years that I have planted a garden.  Please do yourself a favor and buy the book, and you will see what I am talking about.
Bye for now,
Mary

Yowbarb

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Re: SEEDS, started by Yowbarb 2010
« Reply #17 on: July 05, 2010, 07:19:15 AM »
Actually Montanabarb all heirloom seeds are open pollinated, its a method of saving the seed.
Here's a link to explain it.

http://www.southernexposure.com/open_pollination.p.html

Take care,
Linda

Why We Sell Open Pollinated Seed
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Today, seeds are generally bred in an open pollinated environment, through a hybrid cross, and through genetic modification. Here at Southern Exposure Seeds Exchange, we specialize in open pollinated seeds.

Open pollinated seed saving is the oldest of the three methods, in all likelihood predating agriculture itself. All heirloom seeds are open pollinated. When a breeder raises a population of open pollinated plants that are of a like variety and keeps pollen from other varieties from entering the patch (generally accomplished with just distance from another variety), she or he will have the ability to save open pollinated seeds from the patch. If the best two thirds of the patch is used for the seed crop, the variety will generally hold it's quality through the generations. If only the best half or fewer plants are saved for seed, the variety will generally improve.

Hybridization, on the other hand, is when some technical method is applied to two open pollinated varieties growing side by side to ensure that every seed has received pollen from one breed (the father) and is grown on a distinctly different breed (the mother). This is done in many methods, the most commonly know being corn detasseling. In this method, three rows of the father breed are planted, and then one of the mother, and over and over. The mother rows are detasseled (had their pollen removed) ensuring that any pollen they receive came from the father rows. The mother's seeds can then be harvested as what is known as an F1 (first generation) hybrid. If the offspring of the F1 hybrid were all grown as an open pollinated variety and the seed saved, that would then be the F2 hybrid generation, and so on.

In order to understand why this is important to us at Southern Exposure Seed Exchange, it is important to understand what the genetic ramifications of these two methods are. There are many many genes occurring in pairs on the chromosomes of every living organism. Of all those organisms that were sexually reproduced (including both discussed methods above), one of every pair of genes is received from the mother and the other from the father.

These genes pairing off on their chromosomes have all the preset genetic material to make the organism what it is. If the genes were different, the organism would look and act differently. In a hybridized variety, the two parents would each have different genes.

Different genes opposite each other on a chromosome are often represented by different capitalization of a letter. For example, if I were growing an open pollinated tomato that had a characteristic that was consistent, I could say that the gene controlling that characteristic would be represented by the G gene. As all of the mother and father plants share this characteristic, all of the plants in the patch would then have a GG for the matching pair of genes. Now if I had another variety of open pollinated tomato that had a different gene in that spot, I could say that variety has an xx in the same spot on the chromosome.

Now when I hybridize the two varieties to get the F1 generation, I can say they will all have a Gg in this spot, as they got one gene from the GG mother and one gene from the gg Father.

Now say we were to look at the F2 generation. Well, there are four possibilities. Either the seeds will get a G from the father and a G from the mother, a G from the father and a g from the mother, a g from the father and a G from the mother, or a g from the father and a g from the mother. Therefore, half of the plants will be Gg, a quarter will be gg, and a quarter will be GG.

Now say that there were a thousand different genes that were different between the original mother and father. Multiply the thousand by the three possibilities and you see you have the possibility for 3000 distinct varieties to emerge in the F2 generation.

Therefore, if you grow out an open pollinated variety and save it for seed, you will get offspring that are similar to the parents. On the other hand, if you purchase an F1 hybrid seed and you save it for seed and attempt to grow it for seed, the F2 generation will be a very random mix and will not serve any consistent need, as all the plants will be wildly different.

So if you grow an open pollinated variety and you like it, you can save it and adapt it for your area and enjoy the full pleasure of taking the plants through their entire life cycles as they produce for you from generation to generation. If you grow an F1 hybrid seed and you like it, you must go back to the source you purchased it from if you wish to grow it out again.

We believe that for this reason, it is important to sell open pollinated seeds. Over 98% of our seeds are open pollinated, the hybrids being clearly marked online and in our catalog.

The third type of seed breeding is genetic modification. It involves, through laboratory means, taking a seed from one species and implanting it into another species where it would have never naturally occurred. At Southern Exposure Seed Exchange, we have a host of concerns with this breeding technique.



 Southern Exposure Seed Exchange
P.O. Box 460
Mineral, VA 23117
Phone: 540-894-9480
Fax: 540-894-9481
Email: gardens@southernexposure.com 

Yowbarb

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Re: SEEDS, started by Yowbarb 2010
« Reply #18 on: August 14, 2010, 08:27:05 AM »
I am not sure how this info compares with other primo seed sites, but this product got nearly five stars out of five in comsumer rating. "Premium quality non-hybrid seeds, enough to produce a one acre garden."
For fifty bucks, not bad.
Here it is, Yowbarb


COSTCO Main Page http://www.costco.com/ 
Search: Emergency Food Kits & Supplies
http://www.costco.com/Common/Search.aspx?whse=BC&topnav=&search=emergency%20food%20and%20supplies&N=0&Ntt=emergency%20food%20and%20supplies&cm_re=1_en-_-Top_Left_Nav-_-Top_search&lang=en-US

Item # 472432 

Food For Health

Yowbarb

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Re: SEEDS, started by Yowbarb 2010
« Reply #19 on: January 18, 2011, 08:32:02 AM »

bk

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Re: SEEDS, started by Yowbarb 2010
« Reply #20 on: April 15, 2011, 06:52:12 PM »
Saw the post for Costco so I checked Sams Club and found this.

http://www.samsclub.com/sams/shop/product.jsp?productId=prod1620396#desc

Yowbarb

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Re: SEEDS, started by Yowbarb 2010
« Reply #21 on: May 07, 2011, 04:08:57 AM »
WALTON FEED  http://www.waltonfeed.com/
Among the many other survival items they have for sale there are natural SEEDS:

GARDEN SEEDS   http://www.waltonfeed.com/product/1193
                         
                          http://www.waltonfeed.com/product/1194


Montanabarb

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Re: SEEDS, started by Yowbarb 2010
« Reply #22 on: June 01, 2011, 08:28:59 AM »
Here's another example of "Don't believe everything you read (along with not believing "expiration dates" on canned food.

I have never thrown out garden seeds, even if the package states "Packed for--whatever date".)  Consequently, I have seeds saved from many years . Just to experiment, this year I planted seeds marked "Packed for 1985." (The math says they are twenty six years old.)  All the tomatoes (Marglobe and Fireball) are about six inches high no.  About half the spinach sprouted, and all the herbs.  The squash and zucchini (how the heck do you spell that) did not sprout at all. There were others--can't remember the names.  These seeds were kept cool, in the dark, in their original packages, inside a blue plastic bag.  The '85s were the oldest, but I have some from nearly every year. 

On the downside, my neighbor, who had agreed to tend the chicks and veggie plants, killed about half my other seedlings with huge quantities of water.  I am chagrinned--I thought everybody knew at least a modicum of gardening.  At least it's early enough to replant most of them. 

noproblemo2

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Re: SEEDS, started by Yowbarb 2010
« Reply #23 on: June 01, 2011, 08:34:05 AM »
Good to know about th seeds, Thanks. Sorry to hear about your seedlings tho.

Yowbarb

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Re: SEEDS, started by Yowbarb 2010
« Reply #24 on: August 10, 2011, 11:14:55 PM »
Jim posted about this company in the Favorable Locations Topic.
Thanks, Jim.
Here is the site, seeds section. Scroll way down on the left margin,
Yowbarb


http://www.alpinesurvival.com/Alpine-Group-and-Associates.html

Survival Seed Garden ▼             
Survival-Seeds.
                   

Survival Seed Bank Garden    http://www.alpinesurvival.com/Survival-Seed-Bank.html

Heirloom Non-Hybrid Seeds    http://www.alpinesurvival.com/Heirloom-Non-Hybrid-Survival-Seeds.html

► Produce Nutrient Dense Foods
► Feed Your Family Well, Forever
► Enough for an Acre of Produce
► 20+ Year Shelf Life

New Survival Seed Bank™
Lets You Plant A
Full Acre Crisis Garden!
New "Survival Seed Bank™" Produces Thousands Of Pounds Of Nutrient-Dense Food For Pennies Per Pound... Enough To Feed Friends And Family Forever!

Yowbarb

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Re: SEEDS, started by Yowbarb 2010
« Reply #25 on: August 10, 2011, 11:19:16 PM »
Oddly, I happened to get an email from one of my industry contacts (apparently there is a need for sunglass wearing beer drinking hosts that I was unaware of  8) ) who is a carpenter on a highly popular television series about a black listed spy.

He sent me this link a few days ago that I thought was interesting and actually on topic. I am probably going to order a few sets of these.

http://www.mredepot.com/servlet/the-611/canned-garden-vegetable-seeds/Detail

Also, being raised on a farm, I can attest that the open pollination seeds are more desirable. The storage techniques (moisture content, freezing, cold storage, etc.) are also valuable however useless in the after times. They could be winter stored in a cold cellar for a season. Vacuum sealing is also an option provided the vacuum doesn't break the seed husks.

One of the seed options that I am looking at (I'm not too sure on the long term viability of using this - however if we're faced with no ability to grow outdoors for a few years.....) is sprout farming indoors. I'm exploring the options now.

Product you posted looks good - hermetically -sealed cans.
1 Can of 22 Different Heirloom/Non-GMO Canned Vegetable / Garden Seeds for Long Term Storage
SKU: FE1016
Price: $39.95


Yowbarb
« Last Edit: August 10, 2011, 11:21:07 PM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: SEEDS, started by Yowbarb 2010
« Reply #26 on: August 21, 2011, 07:36:48 AM »
Leah posted this info in the Financial/economic collapse Topic.
Sounds good, I found the site under Seeds Trust
Yowbarb

This must be the one since it is Cornville AZ and has the same phone Leah posted.

http://www.seedstrust.com/joomla/

Contact Us!
Address:
Seeds Trust
PO Box 596
Cornville
AZ
86325
USA

E-mail:    support3@seedstrust.com
Telephone:    Day Phone: 928.649.3315
Fax:    Toll Free Fax: 877.686.7524

Information:    Email has become the most dependable way to contact us. We check most every day.

During much of the summer and fall we are out in the trials gardens or gathering seeds. If phoning, please leave a detailed message. (Voice mail is also secure for credit card orders.)
....................................................................................
"We also found a great place to buy seeds, Seed Trust in Cornville AZ, we visited their "store."  Wes, who is about 80, took us around to see his seeds and put together a paint can full of seed pkgs for $65, the cost was actually a little more than that but we didn't have correct change so he took what we had, nice guy, nice to buy locally.  You can find them @ www.seedtrust.com, or call 928-648-3315 ..."

augonit

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Re: SEEDS, started by Yowbarb 2010
« Reply #27 on: August 21, 2011, 07:56:52 AM »
Here's another example of "Don't believe everything you read (along with not believing "expiration dates" on canned food.

I have never thrown out garden seeds, even if the package states "Packed for--whatever date".)  Consequently, I have seeds saved from many years . Just to experiment, this year I planted seeds marked "Packed for 1985." (The math says they are twenty six years old.)  All the tomatoes (Marglobe and Fireball) are about six inches high no.  About half the spinach sprouted, and all the herbs.  The squash and zucchini (how the heck do you spell that) did not sprout at all. There were others--can't remember the names.  These seeds were kept cool, in the dark, in their original packages, inside a blue plastic bag.  The '85s were the oldest, but I have some from nearly every year. 

On the downside, my neighbor, who had agreed to tend the chicks and veggie plants, killed about half my other seedlings with huge quantities of water.  I am chagrinned--I thought everybody knew at least a modicum of gardening.  At least it's early enough to replant most of them.

I planeted parsley from seeds that were 2-4 years old.  They didn't come up!  I planted them 3 times in different locations, but nothing!  My other old seeds were OK though.

Yowbarb

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Re: SEEDS, started by Yowbarb 2010
« Reply #28 on: August 21, 2011, 08:11:53 AM »
Here's another example of "Don't believe everything you read (along with not believing "expiration dates" on canned food.

I have never thrown out garden seeds, even if the package states "Packed for--whatever date".)  Consequently, I have seeds saved from many years . Just to experiment, this year I planted seeds marked "Packed for 1985." (The math says they are twenty six years old.)  All the tomatoes (Marglobe and Fireball) are about six inches high no.  About half the spinach sprouted, and all the herbs.  The squash and zucchini (how the heck do you spell that) did not sprout at all. There were others--can't remember the names.  These seeds were kept cool, in the dark, in their original packages, inside a blue plastic bag.  The '85s were the oldest, but I have some from nearly every year. 

On the downside, my neighbor, who had agreed to tend the chicks and veggie plants, killed about half my other seedlings with huge quantities of water.  I am chagrinned--I thought everybody knew at least a modicum of gardening.  At least it's early enough to replant most of them.

I planeted parsley from seeds that were 2-4 years old.  They didn't come up!  I planted them 3 times in different locations, but nothing!  My other old seeds were OK though.

augonit  there are some techniques to help the older seeds of certain varieties to grow.
Will try to find.

A reminder to All, we have this Topic too, here in this same Board.
- YB

Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
Started by Yowbarb «  »

http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?topic=779.0



augonit

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Re: SEEDS, started by Yowbarb 2010
« Reply #29 on: August 21, 2011, 08:24:22 AM »
Thanks YB.  I was disappointed and surprised they didn't come up.  I use lots of parsley and was looking forward to the fresh parsley.