Author Topic: Growing vegetables, fruits and herbs in pots  (Read 5518 times)

Yowbarb

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Yowbarb

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Re: Growing vegetables, fruits and herbs in pots
« Reply #16 on: June 23, 2017, 02:33:20 PM »
Yes, Barb, Lots of excellent info indeed!  Thanks so much for posting it all.  I'm sure it's going to be a great help to me since it's actually been quite a few years since I've taken on a large gardening project like I've got planned for this year!

Enlightenme, come on back! :)

Yowbarb

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Re: Growing vegetables, fruits and herbs in pots
« Reply #17 on: June 23, 2017, 02:47:04 PM »
Yowbarb Note: This article from Mother Earth News has four pages.
Just posting the first here. Click the link second link below for the whole article.

Also, a link to a slideshow:


http://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-gardening/gardening-techniques/container-gardening-zm0z12amzhun?slideshow=1
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http://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-gardening/gardening-techniques/container-gardening-zm0z12amzhun

Container Gardening With Vegetables and Herbs
If you don’t have a good garden spot in your yard, why not grow some vegetables and herbs using container gardening?

By Barbara Pleasant
April/May 2012

These are among the best food crops for container gardening: artichoke, arugula, bok choy, celery, chard, cucumber, eggplant, garlic, lettuce, onion, pepper, snap bean, pea, tomato and most herbs. Look for compact varieties that will grow best in a confined space.

The most personal way to forge a connection with delicious food crops — from arugula to tomatoes — is to grow them up close in containers. Special methods are needed to produce high-quality food crops in containers, because most vegetables and herbs grow best when planted in the ground. Stable soil temperatures and constant access to water, nutrients and microscopic soil allies give in-ground crops a clear advantage.

But if growing edibles in the ground is not an option due to a lack of backyard space, destructive pets or homeowner association rules, then growing some crops in containers on your porch, patio or fire escape may be the solution. Also, if you have problems with your site or soil that prevent in-ground gardening, then container gardening may allow you to avoid some of these problems:

• Shade from buildings and trees can be minimized by moving container-grown vegetables to your sunniest spots, which change with the seasons.

• Soil pH barriers can be overcome by using custom soil mixes to grow plants that need more or less acidic soil conditions than are common in your area. For example, containers are a good way to grow acid-loving strawberries or potatoes if your soil is naturally neutral or alkaline.

• Protection from soilborne pests, from nematodes to voles, and greatly reduced weed problems are natural benefits of container gardening. Where soilborne diseases such as tomato Fusarium are common, containers are an easy way to grow lovely ‘Yellow Pear’ tomatoes and other susceptible varieties.

• Contaminated soil from toxic lead in old paint, termite pesticides applied to your home’s foundation, chemicals that have leached from treated wood, and other hazards, should not be a problem as long as you use good quality soil mix. (These concerns are especially relevant on urban and reclaimed lots.)

Then there’s the convenience factor. Although my vegetable garden is right in my backyard, I want containers of sweet peppers, parsley, cherry tomatoes and basil within steps of my kitchen door. If you live in an apartment or condo with no yard, you can still have a summer’s worth of veggies right at your fingertips.

One big difference between in-ground and container-grown vegetables is root temperature. In summer, warm daytime temperatures will cause plant roots in containers to warm up by 15 degrees Fahrenheit or more (this never happens 4 inches below ground). And dark containers accumulate solar heat, which intensifies this effect. Warm roots can be your enemy or your friend, depending on the season and the crop. Eggplant, peppers, tomatoes and okra love warm roots, while onions and celery (a surprisingly successful container plant) need cooler feet. You can’t control the weather, but you can minimize soil temperature swings by using the largest containers possible and choosing light-colored containers when appropriate.