Author Topic: Kudzu: You can eat "the plant that ate the south."  (Read 2593 times)

Yowbarb

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Kudzu: You can eat "the plant that ate the south."
« on: August 10, 2012, 01:22:36 PM »
Common names for kudzu include:
mile-a-minute vine,
foot-a-night vine,
and the vine that ate the South.

The Book of Kudzu: A Culinary and Healing Guide by William Shurtleff and Akiko Aoyagi,

http://www.southernangel.com/food/kudzurcp.html

"You can eat Kudzu? Why sure! Find some vines off the beaten path and pick a mess!

To cook with Kudzu, choose only the smallest, most tender leaves. Large leaves are too tough. Even the small leaves have plenty of body. The plants can even be out by your metal or garden shed. Fresh and tender, the leaves have a flavor similar to that of a green bean. That's because Kudzu is a member of the legume. family."

Wanna read about Kudzu? Visit Kudzu: Friend, Foe or Food?

| Kudzu Blossom Jelly   http://www.southernangel.com/food/kudzurcp.html#kudjelly

| Rolled Kudzu Leaves  http://www.southernangel.com/food/kudzurcp.html#rolled

| Kudzu Quiche             http://www.southernangel.com/food/kudzurcp.html#quiche

| Kudzu Tea                  http://www.southernangel.com/food/kudzurcp.html#kudtea

| Deep Fried Kudzu Leaves |  http://www.southernangel.com/food/kudzurcp.html#rolled

Yowbarb

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Re: Kudzu: You can eat "the plant that ate the south."
« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2012, 01:41:49 PM »
Kudzu appears to be a bit controversial.
Here is the wikipedia article on it, uses for food, livestock, problems , medicinal uses, etc.
http://altmedicine.about.com/od/completeazindex/a/kudzu.htm  Read all this, too. Not for use by some people, some conditions. Generally safe. More later, will post in Medicinal Foods board too.
Yowbarb

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kudzu

http://www.ehow.com/how_7788205_extract-kudzu-plant-oil.html  How to Extract Kudzu Plant Oil

How to Extract Kudzu Plant Oil
By Amie Taylor, eHow Contributor
If you've ever traveled through the Southeastern United States, you've undoubtedly encountered kudzu, whether you knew what it was or not. This highly aggressive vine covers everything it comes in contact with. With a growth rate of a foot per day in the growing season, kudzu multiplies rapidly. Kudzu oil is used in a variety of home-beauty treatments, aromatherapy remedies and in Chinese medicine. You can extract your own kudzu oil at home with a few simple steps. Does this Spark an idea?

Things You'll Need
Food processor
Kudzu leaves and vine
Cheesecloth
Bowl
Storage container

Instructions
1    Cut several lengths of kudzu from the vine. Cut these pieces into shorter lengths of approximately
      2 inches apiece, that will fit easily into your food processor.

2    Place the kudzu in the food processor, put the lid on and puree the kudzu into a lumpy mixture.

3    Place your cheesecloth over a bowl and stretch it tight. You may want to have another person
      hold the cheesecloth or stretch a rubber band over it to keep it secure.

4    Dump the contents from the food processor onto the cheesecloth. Allow the plant oil to soak
      through the cheesecloth into the bowl. Press the material into the cheesecloth with the back of
      a spoon to extract all of the oil. Discard any remaining plant material. Repeat this process until
      you have the desired amount of kudzu oil.

5   Store the kudzu oil in a plastic-storage container or glass jar and refrigerate it. Label the
     container clearly so everyone is aware of its contents.

Read more: How to Extract Kudzu Plant Oil | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_7788205_extract-kudzu-plant-oil.html#ixzz23B4i7oz6


Yowbarb

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Re: Kudzu: You can eat "the plant that ate the south."
« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2012, 02:06:54 PM »
EatTheWeeds: Episode 73: Kudzu    9:08  15,197 Views

VIDEO LINK:  http://youtu.be/jbCMDQSWFWY

Uploaded by EatTheWeeds on Apr 17, 2009
http://www.eattheweeds.com/kudzu-pueraria-montana-var-lobata-fried-2/

Learn about wild food with Green Deane. In this video we'll take a look at kudzu, the "vine that ate the south" though it is found as far north as Maine and around the world

Yowbarb

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Re: Kudzu: You can eat "the plant that ate the south."
« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2016, 11:58:43 AM »
http://www.jjanthony.com/kudzu/images/cabin.jpg    kudzu-covered cabin

http://s.hswstatic.com/gif/kudzu1.jpg  kudzu

http://www.al.com/news/birmingham/index.ssf/2014/08/who_did_red_mountain_park_call.html

Natural solution to kudzu: 50 goats eat the green off Red Mountain Park

Goat Busters ad sign in Virginia


Yowbarb

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Yowbarb

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Re: Kudzu: You can eat "the plant that ate the south."
« Reply #5 on: October 28, 2016, 11:56:35 PM »
EatTheWeeds: Episode 73: Kudzu  9:07    34,432 views

https://youtu.be/jbCMDQSWFWY

Uploaded on Apr 17, 2009
http://www.eattheweeds.com/kudzu-puer...

Learn about wild food with Green Deane. In this video we'll take a look at kudzu, the "vine that ate the south" though it is found as far north as Maine and around the world.

Socrates

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Re: Kudzu: You can eat "the plant that ate the south."
« Reply #6 on: October 29, 2016, 11:00:03 AM »
A quick visit to Permies.com supplies quite a few interesting tidbits...
Quote
If you are somewhere hot and humid do not plant kudzu, it will eat your whole property, and become a pest for everyone in your area. If you are up somewhere like boston Kudzu is a great plant to plant.

I've heard that when you are ready to get rid of it, bring pigs in - they love it so much, they will wipe it out completely.
I think it could very well be a permaculture miracle plant

Kudzu roots are way too deep for pigs to eradicate. 4-5 feet in the ground if it's soft enough.

P.S. For those concerned about killing the plant. 1. get goats to consume all the foliage as well as new seedlings the next few years. 2. Remove the root crown. The root crown is all that needs to be removed, NOT the entire root

It grows as a perennial in all of new england and everything to the south or the west of nebraska, as well as washington and oregon. But as I said, hot and humid=monoculture. I remember visiting my father in Alabama and seeing just a little plant climbing up a telephone pole when I arrived (literally5 vines creeping maybe 6' up a pole), then a few months later as I was leaving seeing an area of mixed forest the size of a football field covered.  came back four years later and all the trees had rotted (or been eaten by termites) and fallen to the ground, and it was just a field of kudzu. These were not small trees either, 60-80 foot tall oak trees, about 18" thick at chest hight. Kudzu is so aggressive that it smothers bindweed and blackberry brambles.

it will hold soil against erosion (the original purpose for importing it).
But!
It also kills entire forests, covers houses, and is a constant battle to keep in check.

5 gallon plants growing in my bedroom with an east-facing window:
Urine seems to effectively control its growth. Of the two plants that I peed on, both wilted and eventually lost all their foliage. The third plant received no urination and grew from ground height to the ceiling in three weeks! Keep in mind this is a VERY low light-level condition. The plant receives no direct sunlight, and only filtered artificial light. The leaves look wonderful despite this, and maybe only slightly etiolated.

Oh, and perfectly aligned with a lot of the concerns here:  I heard from a lot of people in the south that were surrounded by an ocean of kudzu, but they had very little on their property - probably because they had animals that ate it.  It sounded like a permaculture story:  the problem wasn't too much kudzu, but not enough animals to eat it.

(Permaculture expert) Toby Hemenway: Kudzu is there to repair the soil, and lets us know there's a problem that needs to be dealt with. Repair the soils, and the kudzu dies back.

I don't think kudzu is capable of invading mature ecosystems. Whenever I go to the south I see it along the edges of roads or in pine forests that look like they were logged within the last 20 years or so. When I walk deeper into the forest, no kudzu.

arid areas might be appropriate, as the lack of rainfall can keep it in check
Based on what i've read this past hour or so on Kudzu... I'd say:
- with roots full of carbs, i'm thinking survival food or source of alcohol
- in some regions getting green for biomass is terribly difficult and it could be a godsend there
- idem for fodder for your animals

Kudzu has been used in permaculture as a source of biomass. You cut-and-drop the green; this lies there breaking down, protecting the earth, giving minerals the Kudzu drew up from below.

I'm also thinking, hey, did you know farmers used to work very hard to get rid of trees for cropland? Imagine bringing in some kudzu, letting it bring down the forest and you coming back years later with only rotting trunks to deal with? [Post-apocalyptic scenario.]

Also, apparently kudzu still thrives under less-than-optimal light conditions; what if the world's atmosphere is polluted and there's little sunlight? Kudzu might save both your life and that of your animals for supplying just enough green and roots to pull you through. [Heard of the year without Sun 1500 years ago?]

Btw...

ROFL
« Last Edit: October 29, 2016, 11:15:26 AM by Socrates »
survival database
location, civilisation reboot, PERMACULTURE, postcataclysmic soil, Growing Soil 1.01

ilinda

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Re: Kudzu: You can eat "the plant that ate the south."
« Reply #7 on: October 29, 2016, 05:13:42 PM »
And isn't kudzu one of the herbs that can help alcoholics get on the wagon, as it supposedly makes the taste of alcohol repulsive to the drinker?

Yowbarb

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Re: Kudzu: You can eat "the plant that ate the south."
« Reply #8 on: November 06, 2016, 05:45:06 AM »
And isn't kudzu one of the herbs that can help alcoholics get on the wagon, as it supposedly makes the taste of alcohol repulsive to the drinker?

I will have to check that, about the alcohol...probably true.
Kudzu  is used in Japan as an herb to help people addicted to substances... http://planetxtownhall.com/index.php?topic=1038.15  Other kudzu topic is in Alternative Medicine -  Herbs, Foods and Methods, started by a former Member, Lori in 2011.
« Last Edit: November 06, 2016, 06:13:07 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Kudzu: You can eat "the plant that ate the south."
« Reply #9 on: November 06, 2016, 05:51:34 AM »
A quick visit to Permies.com supplies quite a few interesting tidbits...
Quote
If you are somewhere hot and humid do not plant kudzu, it will eat your whole property, and become a pest for everyone in your area. If you are up somewhere like boston Kudzu is a great plant to plant.

I've heard that when you are ready to get rid of it, bring pigs in - they love it so much, they will wipe it out completely.
I think it could very well be a permaculture miracle plant

Kudzu roots are way too deep for pigs to eradicate. 4-5 feet in the ground if it's soft enough.

P.S. For those concerned about killing the plant. 1. get goats to consume all the foliage as well as new seedlings the next few years. 2. Remove the root crown. The root crown is all that needs to be removed, NOT the entire root

It grows as a perennial in all of new england and everything to the south or the west of nebraska, as well as washington and oregon. But as I said, hot and humid=monoculture. I remember visiting my father in Alabama and seeing just a little plant climbing up a telephone pole when I arrived (literally5 vines creeping maybe 6' up a pole), then a few months later as I was leaving seeing an area of mixed forest the size of a football field covered.  came back four years later and all the trees had rotted (or been eaten by termites) and fallen to the ground, and it was just a field of kudzu. These were not small trees either, 60-80 foot tall oak trees, about 18" thick at chest hight. Kudzu is so aggressive that it smothers bindweed and blackberry brambles.

it will hold soil against erosion (the original purpose for importing it).
But!
It also kills entire forests, covers houses, and is a constant battle to keep in check.

5 gallon plants growing in my bedroom with an east-facing window:
Urine seems to effectively control its growth. Of the two plants that I peed on, both wilted and eventually lost all their foliage. The third plant received no urination and grew from ground height to the ceiling in three weeks! Keep in mind this is a VERY low light-level condition. The plant receives no direct sunlight, and only filtered artificial light. The leaves look wonderful despite this, and maybe only slightly etiolated.

Oh, and perfectly aligned with a lot of the concerns here:  I heard from a lot of people in the south that were surrounded by an ocean of kudzu, but they had very little on their property - probably because they had animals that ate it.  It sounded like a permaculture story:  the problem wasn't too much kudzu, but not enough animals to eat it.

(Permaculture expert) Toby Hemenway: Kudzu is there to repair the soil, and lets us know there's a problem that needs to be dealt with. Repair the soils, and the kudzu dies back.

I don't think kudzu is capable of invading mature ecosystems. Whenever I go to the south I see it along the edges of roads or in pine forests that look like they were logged within the last 20 years or so. When I walk deeper into the forest, no kudzu.

arid areas might be appropriate, as the lack of rainfall can keep it in check
Based on what i've read this past hour or so on Kudzu... I'd say:
- with roots full of carbs, i'm thinking survival food or source of alcohol
- in some regions getting green for biomass is terribly difficult and it could be a godsend there
- idem for fodder for your animals

Kudzu has been used in permaculture as a source of biomass. You cut-and-drop the green; this lies there breaking down, protecting the earth, giving minerals the Kudzu drew up from below.

I'm also thinking, hey, did you know farmers used to work very hard to get rid of trees for cropland? Imagine bringing in some kudzu, letting it bring down the forest and you coming back years later with only rotting trunks to deal with? [Post-apocalyptic scenario.]

Also, apparently kudzu still thrives under less-than-optimal light conditions; what if the world's atmosphere is polluted and there's little sunlight? Kudzu might save both your life and that of your animals for supplying just enough green and roots to pull you through. [Heard of the year without Sun 1500 years ago?]

Btw...

ROFL

Socrates, thanks for some excellent data and ideas!
One thing you mentioned, I was thinking that also, awhile back the ability of the kudzu to grow where other things won't.. the survival aspects.
My main thing is, 1) if a person is surrounded with it, in a survival situation, realize the animals can eat it. People can consume it like a vegetable. This could save lives
2) It is POSSIBLE kudzu be able to withstand disasters other plants won't.
3) If surrounded with it and not a survival situation your goats can eat it...
RE Kudzu alcoholic beverage _ I will look into that.  ;)
I had posted that ad with the goats... haha.

Yowbarb

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Re: Kudzu: You can eat "the plant that ate the south."
« Reply #10 on: November 06, 2016, 06:26:26 AM »
And isn't kudzu one of the herbs that can help alcoholics get on the wagon, as it supposedly makes the taste of alcohol repulsive to the drinker?

ilinda, I found this...probably lots of other references. :) Funny I thought Kudzu was brought here by the Japanese...oh well.  More on this page, will post it in one of the Topic with special food and herbs... PS It is Kudzu, found in Alternative Medicine -  Herbs, Foods and Methods That Topic started in 2011 by former Member and administrator Lori. We keep it and add to it. Anyway, this is a standard med article so there are probably better ones i could find.
- bt
...
http://www.webmd.com/mental-health/addiction/news/20120517/chinese-herb-kudzu-may-help-drinkers-cut-down

Chinese Herb Kudzu May Help Drinkers Cut Down
In Small Study, Harvard Researchers Find Kudzu Extract Reduces Drinking

ALSO: Kudzu: A Brief History
In Chinese pharmacy books, kudzu is listed as a possible treatment for alcohol-related hangovers and cravings, Penetar tells WebMD.

"Some of the references go back to 600 A.D.," he says.

Today, it's used in China and other countries to treat coronary problems and blood-flow problems, Penetar says. "It has a good safety record already."

It's touted as a hangover remedy. However, studies looking at the effects of kudzu extracts have produced mixed findings, Penetar says.