Author Topic: When you need to be the doctor since there is no one else!  (Read 20924 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: When you need to be the doctor since there is no one else!
« Reply #135 on: November 05, 2017, 07:29:41 PM »
Quote
If anyone needs poor soil this dry, sandy Florida stuff full of ants would do just fine, haha.  will ship it to ya for  $10 per box.  8)

 :D

Hope you feel better soon Barb!

Thankx! :)

MadMax

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Re: When you need to be the doctor since there is no one else!
« Reply #136 on: November 06, 2017, 02:44:44 PM »
New Virus With NO CURE Spreading: This Is WORSE Than The ‘Black Death’

http://www.shtfplan.com/headline-news/new-virus-with-no-cure-spreading-this-is-worse-than-the-black-death_11062017

A new virus for which medical officials have no remedy is spreading. The infectious disease also has a fatality rate of almost 90% making it much more deadly than the black death plaguing Madagascar.

A deadly outbreak of a rare and highly fatal virus has broken out in eastern Uganda and five cases have already been identified, the World Health Organization (WHO) has confirmed. The disease is known as the Marburg virus. It is similar to the Ebola virus and can be fatal in up to 88% of cases.

The outbreak of the contagious and deadly Marburg virus disease in the Kween district of eastern Uganda was declared by the nation’s Ministry of Health back on October 19. Since then, five cases have been identified as international aid agencies, stretched thin by Madagascar’s black death outbreak, have rushed to deploy teams on the ground to control the recent outbreak. This news comes amid a surge in cases of plague in Madagascar, which is considered to be the “worst outbreak in 50 years” and now at “crisis” point.

Marburg virus disease (MVD), which causes severe viral hemorrhagic fever, ranks among the most virulent pathogens known to infect humans, according to the World Health Organization. The WHO website reads: “Marburg virus disease is a rare disease with a high mortality rate for which there is no specific treatment. The virus is transmitted by direct contact with the blood, body fluids, and tissues of infected persons or wild animals (e.g. monkeys and fruit bats).” MVD also falls within the same family as the Ebola virus – the hemorrhagic fever that decimated West Africa and killed around 11,000 in 2014 and 2015.

The outbreak is thought to have begun in September when a man in his 30s, who worked as a game hunter and lived near a cave with a heavy presence of bats, was admitted to a local health center with a high fever, vomiting, and diarrhea. The man’s condition deteriorated quickly and he failed to respond to antimalarial treatments. He died after being taken to another hospital, and a short time later, his sister in her 50’s also died of the same ailment.

Emergency screening has begun at the Kenya-Uganda border in Turkana after all three members of the same family died of the disease in Uganda. Health workers have been asked to work with communities to stop the deadly Marburg outbreak from devastating communities in the rural region.

Dr. Zabulon Yoti, a Technical Coordinator for Emergencies at the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Africa, said: “Community engagement is the cornerstone of emergency response.” He urged health officials to “work with the communities to build their capacity for success and sustainability” and develop a better understanding of the local customs and traditions.

Early symptoms include fever, chills, headache, and myalgia (muscle pain). Several hundred people have been exposed to the virus as officials worry this outbreak could spread rapidly into regions already devastated by the ongoing black death outbreak.

Max.
"Ignorance is Bliss" - (Agent Smith the first Matrix Movie)

ilinda

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Re: When you need to be the doctor since there is no one else!
« Reply #137 on: November 06, 2017, 05:03:41 PM »
Ilinda, Do you grown the mullein in your garden?  Is it the same thing as verbascum?  I seem to remember trying to grow it here some years back, but it was very short-lived in our wet climate.
Mullein grows wild around here and is easy to find and harvest.  On a regular route I take, I noticed a large patch--one of the largest I've seen lately--of mullein this summer and almost stopped a few times to harvest some, but already had a jar full (dried). 

Verbascum is "a plant of the genus that comprises the mulleins"; in the  family Scrophulariaceae.  Common mullein is a biennial, and in the second year will send up a huge flower spike, sometimes up to 5-6' tall.  IIRC, the flowers are used for (? eye or ear? ) infections, while I use the leaves (in decoction) for relief from copious respiratory mucous production.

ilinda

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Re: When you need to be the doctor since there is no one else!
« Reply #138 on: November 06, 2017, 05:09:31 PM »
Then the rich woodland soil back in the herb garden would probably explain our inability to keep it growing for any length of time here.  I also cannot grow lavender here :(
For lavendar, try building up a perimeter of your flower bed with huge boulders, the bigger the better, and also dark in color.  Now befin filling the bed with compost, old hay, etc., until it's rich and thick, but not thick, gooey clay.  Try lavendar in that.

Years ago, on a lark,  I planted lavendar here in the Ozarks, and was surprised that it grew well.  Later discovered the rocks surrounding the lavendar helped hold the heat in these cold winters, and they lived for many years, finally petering out.  Another friend in the area grew it, and she also discovered by accident that the rocks around her herb garden were probably responsible, in part, for its survival.  I suppose we are ordinarily just a bit too cold in winter, but the rocks are a heat sink of sorts.

R.R. Book

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Re: When you need to be the doctor since there is no one else!
« Reply #139 on: November 06, 2017, 05:40:40 PM »
That's a great idea Ilinda!  We actually do have a terraced garden in the back due to the hillside, and there is a long strip of big rocks.  Only trouble is, I've seen some pretty long corn snakes right around there, and the boys claim to have seen an occasional pit viper in the woods, so am 'fraid of sticking my hands in between the rocks! :o

I do have some volunteer prairie mallow that comes up each May on its own between the rocks though, and just encourage it by not bothering it.  It stayed in one place for a number of years, and only recently began spreading around the garden :)

« Last Edit: November 07, 2017, 08:16:44 AM by R.R. Book »

Yowbarb

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Re: When you need to be the doctor since there is no one else!
« Reply #140 on: November 18, 2017, 09:19:45 AM »
That's a great idea Ilinda!  We actually do have a terraced garden in the back due to the hillside, and there is a long strip of big rocks.  Only trouble is, I've seen some pretty long corn snakes right around there, and the boys claim to have seen an occasional pit viper in the woods, so am 'fraid of sticking my hands in between the rocks! :o

I do have some volunteer prairie mallow that comes up each May on its own between the rocks though, and just encourage it by not bothering it.  It stayed in one place for a number of years, and only recently began spreading around the garden :)



RR, wow, I can see why you wouldn't want to dig around there... if pit vipers like the area too...

ilinda

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Re: When you need to be the doctor since there is no one else!
« Reply #141 on: November 18, 2017, 01:50:24 PM »
Just this past summer I saw, twice, a beautiful copperhead snake at the base of the corn bed, and didn't disturb it, hoping it would get its fill of any mouse or rat that even looked sideways at my corn.  It may have worked, as the corn did produce and wasn't bothered by anything. 

I welcome all snakes on our farm, but just hope if copperheads or rattlers are around, they are obvious, so we don't accidentally step on one.

R.R. Book

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Re: When you need to be the doctor since there is no one else!
« Reply #142 on: November 18, 2017, 04:00:43 PM »
They do tend to shy away from contact with people.  The wooded stone outcropping with shallow caves that we live on was untouched by development for many years, so was a natural copperhead and rattlesnake habitat.  They have occasionally emerged due to the land being rearranged by developers.  The boys sighted their first one in a large log pile left by our builder, and were duly warned by the rattler.  We keep chewable papaya enzymes on-hand in case of a bite, but there seems to be very little danger of one actually happening as long as folks walk mindfully in the woods. :)