Author Topic: Keeping food cool  (Read 2306 times)

Yowbarb

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Keeping food cool
« on: May 28, 2013, 08:50:34 PM »
Yowbarb Note: I feel there are survival methods to learn here...article and video.
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http://www.minds.com/blog/view/50454/refrigeration-without-electricity

Refrigeration Without Electricity.

Exposing The Truth
Public

By Exposing The Truth 51 days ago
Category: Science & Technology

Region of Impact: Nigeria
Project Overview:

Mobah Rural Horizons, is a Rural Development and Consulting Organization that designs, invents, and disseminates appropriate technologies for poor rural areas. The project is a fresh foods preservation system that uses two clay pots. This system requires no electricity supply to preserve and prolong the storage life of perishable fresh food items.

Problem Addressed:

For people who live in hot climates with little electricity, food spoils quickly. Produce spoils in within three days without refrigeration, forcing farmers to rush their crops to the market and sell them at undervalued prices. This has a lot of consequences to the farmers, and their families, because it affects their village life and leads a decrease in income in the poor rural areas. For Kano City, which is around 60 miles from many farmers, the fresh produce that is grown rots along the way, causing its farmers to earn smaller profits and provide for fewer people.

Refrigeration is a method for storing foods around the world, but places in Africa like Kano City do not have the resources to support a stable supply of electricity to make

Mobah Rural Horizons, is a Rural Development and Consulting Organization that designs, invents, and disseminates appropriate technologies for poor rural areas. The project is a fresh foods preservation system that uses two clay pots. This system requires no electricity supply to preserve and prolong the storage life of perishable fresh food items.

Problem Addressed:

For people who live in hot climates with little electricity, food spoils quickly. Produce spoils in within three days without refrigeration, forcing farmers to rush their crops to the market and sell them at undervalued prices. This has a lot of consequences to the farmers, and their families, because it affects their village life and leads a decrease in income in the poor rural areas. For Kano City, which is around 60 miles from many farmers, the fresh produce that is grown rots along the way, causing its farmers to earn smaller profits and provide for fewer people.

Refrigeration is a method for storing foods around the world, but places in Africa like Kano City do not have the resources to support a stable supply of electricity to make refrigerators a viable option.

Technology Solution:

Mohammed Bah Abba designed an elegantly simple food storage device that is made up of two earthenware pots which utilize the principles of evaporation to create electric-free refrigeration. In between the two pots is a layer of fine, wet, river sand, and on top is a moist jute bag. When kept in a dry, well-ventilated, and shady location, water evaporates, cooling the inner container. As a result, Mohammed's desert refrigerator allows produce to stay fresh for weeks, so less food is wasted, and farmers are able to increase their profits so that they can continue to provide for their communities. Mohammed sells around 30,000 coolers a year to farmers and other people who want to preserve food for their families and communities.

About The Tech Museum of Innovation

The Tech Museum is a hands-on technology and science museum for people of all ages and backgrounds. The museum—located in the Capital of Silicon Valley —is a non-profit, experiential learning resource established to engage people in exploring and experiencing applied technologies affecting their lives. Through programs such as The Tech Challenge presented by Cisco, our annual team-design competition for youth, and internationally renowned programs such as The Tech Awards presented by Applied Materials, The Tech Museum endeavors to inspire the innovator in everyone.

Yowbarb

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Re: Keeping food cool
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2013, 08:54:30 PM »

Survival Refrigeration Without Electricity - Food Storage  1:20  247,359 Views

LINK:  http://youtu.be/ju_V-wjyKiM

Vincent Barrios·163 videos
Uploaded on Nov 23, 2010 
Survival Refrigeration Without Electricity - Food Storage

Yowbarb

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Re: Keeping food cool
« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2013, 09:05:10 PM »

refrigeration without power - the cool box  1:52   153,199 Views

LINK:   http://youtu.be/JOAm0p0BuKM 

paulwheaton12·166 videos
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building the root cellar  4:18  87,604 Views

LINK:   http://youtu.be/C32MqyE26w4 

lilfarmchic

steedy

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Re: Keeping food cool
« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2014, 05:47:57 PM »
What a good idea using the earthware pots!  I've often wondered how to keep food cool without electricity and the only thing I knew of was cellar houses, (or root cellars).

Yowbarb

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Re: Keeping food cool
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2014, 02:56:00 PM »
What a good idea using the earthware pots!  I've often wondered how to keep food cool without electricity and the only thing I knew of was cellar houses, (or root cellars).

I've not tried this method yet. I think it would work well for non-animal protein foods...
 :)

steedy

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Re: Keeping food cool
« Reply #5 on: April 29, 2014, 07:17:49 AM »
Yeah.  These types of preserving food is only for veges and some fruits.  To preserve meat without electricity to run your fridge or freezer, you would have to smoke it or cure it.

Yowbarb

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Re: Keeping food cool
« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2014, 06:56:38 AM »
Yeah.  These types of preserving food is only for veges and some fruits.  To preserve meat without electricity to run your fridge or freezer, you would have to smoke it or cure it.

That's right...

Montanabarb

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Re: Keeping food cool
« Reply #7 on: May 01, 2014, 04:05:04 PM »
Yeah.  These types of preserving food is only for veges and some fruits.  To preserve meat without electricity to run your fridge or freezer, you would have to smoke it or cure it.

Or can it.  Canned meat is tasty and versatile. I've canned: Raw beef, roast beef, chicken, venison, hamburger, trout (and other fish) pork, ham, bacon, and have RE-canned the big commercial sized cans and jars of foods into smaller tempered glass jars, things like shelled clams and tuna. I remember my mother canning fish that was considered "trash fish" because of the over-abundance of bones, and the process of canning turning the fish bones to mush, as in sardines. It made the "trash" just as tasty as other warm water fish.  Home canned meat is used in your recipes pretty much like tuna or canned chicken.  You can also can your favorite stew, pot roast, meat casseroles, etc. You need a pressure cooker to can meat, and a heat source that will generate heat and 15 lbs pressure for about 90 minutes. (A campfire might not do it!) The high heat/pressure is needed to kill pathogens. Virtually all vegetables must be pressure canned, except tomatoes which are high acid and can be canned in a hot water bath. All fruits are also high acid.

P.S. Be SURE to use tempered glass jars for pressure canning. The mess in your canner from a broken jar is not pretty, not to mention wasted food from broken glass.

This is your friendly neighborhood canning lady, with your canning info in a nutshell for the day.  ;)

 All this info is available on line.

Yowbarb

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Re: Keeping food cool
« Reply #8 on: May 02, 2014, 09:52:52 AM »
Yeah.  These types of preserving food is only for veges and some fruits.  To preserve meat without electricity to run your fridge or freezer, you would have to smoke it or cure it.

Or can it.  Canned meat is tasty and versatile. I've canned: Raw beef, roast beef, chicken, venison, hamburger, trout (and other fish) pork, ham, bacon, and have RE-canned the big commercial sized cans and jars of foods into smaller tempered glass jars, things like shelled clams and tuna. I remember my mother canning fish that was considered "trash fish" because of the over-abundance of bones, and the process of canning turning the fish bones to mush, as in sardines. It made the "trash" just as tasty as other warm water fish.  Home canned meat is used in your recipes pretty much like tuna or canned chicken.  You can also can your favorite stew, pot roast, meat casseroles, etc. You need a pressure cooker to can meat, and a heat source that will generate heat and 15 lbs pressure for about 90 minutes. (A campfire might not do it!) The high heat/pressure is needed to kill pathogens. Virtually all vegetables must be pressure canned, except tomatoes which are high acid and can be canned in a hot water bath. All fruits are also high acid.

P.S. Be SURE to use tempered glass jars for pressure canning. The mess in your canner from a broken jar is not pretty, not to mention wasted food from broken glass.

This is your friendly neighborhood canning lady, with your canning info in a nutshell for the day.  ;)

 All this info is available on line.

Montanabarb thanks for your input.
I consider you just about the most knowledgeable one here regarding cultivating foods and preserving them along with so many other survival skills.  :)
- Yowbarb

steedy

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Re: Keeping food cool
« Reply #9 on: May 02, 2014, 12:58:49 PM »
Although I know you can can meats, I was thinking of what if there was no way to use your stove at all.  Electric or gas stove, to can things.  I'm sure you could can stuff over an open fire, but because you can't regulate the heat from a fire, even if it is a wood burning stove, I think it would make canning trickier.  So I was going with what a lot of old timers, my great grandma included, did.