Author Topic: Mental Fitness during end-time and after-time  (Read 6046 times)

Yowbarb

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Re: Mental Fitness during end-time and after-time
« Reply #15 on: July 26, 2014, 05:36:52 PM »
Quote
Since lithium is a salt,

Lithium is a soft silver-white metal. It is the lightest of the alkali metals.

A salt is:
any chemical compound formed from the reaction of an acid with a base, with all or part of the hydrogen of the acid replaced by a metal or other cation.

There are many salts of Lithium.
http://www.sigmaaldrich.com/materials-science/material-science-products.html?TablePage=19295337

Jim thanks for the post and the info... Maybe it is in a salt form in the soil when the cattle get it from the grass...

Yowbarb

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Re: Mental Fitness during end-time and after-time
« Reply #16 on: February 26, 2015, 05:46:23 PM »
I recommend people have a stash of:
•   B1 especially if they are on prescription meds.
•   instant fizzy drink of Calcium Magnesium
•   Valerian root capsules supposedly not for all blood types (Eat Right For Your Type) •   Works well for me, I’m an O+. Sleep and mental health.

ilinda

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Re: Mental Fitness during end-time and after-time
« Reply #17 on: May 22, 2015, 06:45:55 AM »

http://www.livescience.com/50883-brain-research-shows-exercise-boosts-imagination-and-memory.html


Exercise Fuels Mental 'Time Travel'

Wendy Suzuki, NYU Center for Neural Science    |   May 19, 2015 09:00am ET

Wendy Suzuki is a Professor of Neural Science and Psychology at New York University (NYU)'s Center for Neural Science. A popular speaker, she is a regular presenter at the World Science Festival and TEDx, and is frequently interviewed on television and in print for her expertise regarding the effects of exercise on brain function. Her first book, "Healthy Brain, Happy Life" (Dey Street Books, 2015), is now available. Suzuki contributed this article to Live Science's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights.

In my late 30s, when I first began to exercise regularly, I experienced firsthand the profound effects that exercise can have on both my body and my brain. In fact, these observations completely changed my motivation for going to the gym. It started during a river rafting trip on the mighty Cotahuasi river in Peru, in one of the deepest valleys in the world. On that trip I realized that, although I was healthy, I was not nearly as strong as my fellow river rafters: There were 16-year-olds on the trip who could lift more than I could, and there were 60-year-olds who had more stamina than I did. I knew I had to do something about it.

When I got back, I marched to the nearest gym, got myself a trainer and started building a regular and rigorous exercise routine. I started slowly at first, but I'm happy to say I am still exercising regularly today, almost 10 years later. As I made a gradual yet profound change in my exercise routine, I began to notice an equally profound change in both my body and my brain. I noticed not only clear improvements in my strength, stamina and overall cardiovascular fitness, but also striking improvements in my mood, memory, attention — as well as other things that were more difficult to name, at first. I felt like a poster child for all of those positive brain effects reported so frequently by the press.

Exercise improves mood, memory and attention

As a professor of neuroscience with an active research lab, I specialize in the study of the hippocampus, a brain structure critical for long-term memory, so I was particularly interested in how exercise affected my memory. I noticed the cognitive benefits of exercising especially when I was writing grants, and found it much easier to remember and integrate related findings from different journal articles.

In fact, as reviewed in a 2013 article published in Trends in Cognitive Science, we know a lot about the memory functions of the hippocampus, as well as the effects of exercise on the hippocampus, mainly through studies with rodents. We also know, from a series of key studies published throughout the 1990s, that the hippocampus is one of only two brain areas where new brain cells are born in adults — a process known as adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

Experiments with rodents have shown that exercise (in the form of activity on a running wheel) significantly enhances the rate at which new hippocampal cells are born. In addition, a growing number of studies have shown that, compared to sedentary rats, rats that exercise and experience exercise-enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis show better memory performance on a range of different tasks. The striking improvements I saw in my own mood and memory inspired me to want to understand if the same brain changes that researchers had seen in rodents with exercise were also happening in my brain.

I was so fascinated with this question that I shifted my entire research focus from the study of memory in the hippocampus to the effects of exercise on brain functions in people. (I tell the story of how this personal transformation made me change the research direction in my lab, and the science behind it, in my new book Healthy Brain Happy Life.)  ['Healthy Brain, Happy Life' (US, 2015): Book Excerpt]

Can exercise also improve creativity?
As I increased my regular exercise routine, even more astonishing than the improvements in my mood, attention and memory was what seemed to be a newfound spark of creativity.

For example, I found myself coming up with "out of the box" neuroscience courses to teach, I started exploring new hobbies like writing and singing, and started exploring new professional collaborations with artists, musicians and dancers.

In observing that exercise was enhancing not only my memory but also my creativity, I started to explore that connection. It turns out that this observation is consistent with a new discovery related to the functions of the hippocampus. [Delayed Gratification – How the Hippocampus Helps Us Hold Off (Op-Ed)]

More than 50 years of research has clearly linked the hippocampus to episodic memory — that is, memory for the details of the events in our lives. Recent studies have started to provide striking evidence that the hippocampus is also important for what neuropsychologists call "future thinking," otherwise known as imagination.

The hippocampus, the past and the future

In the 1980s, influential Estonian-Canadian memory expert Endel Tulving described remembering personal experiences as "mental time travel," involving both the past and the future. While the vast majority of studies done since Tulving proposed this idea have focused on memory — mental time travel to the past — recent findings suggest that the same brain areas are involved in mental time travel to the future, or future imagination.
The first clear evidence in support of the role of the hippocampus in imagination came from a report published in 2007 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. That study examined patients with selective damage to the hippocampus. Patients with hippocampal damage and people of the same age and education level who did not have damage to the hippocampus were asked to imagine something new that did not contain memories of past events.

When they were asked to imagine a scene in which they were lying on a white, sandy beach in a tropical location, one of the patients with hippocampal damage, who had never visited a tropical beach, said, "As for seeing, I can't really, apart from just sky. I can hear the sound of seagulls and of the sea…. Um… that's about it….."

By contrast, when study participants without hippocampal damage were asked the same question, they provided great detail about the surrounding landscape, the temperature, what they imagined they were drinking and the activities on the fishing boat passing by. These findings, supported by similar results from other studies published in 2011 in the Journal of Neuroscience and in 2010 in the journal Neurocase suggest that damage to the hippocampus produces impairments in the ability to imagine future events, in addition to the hippocampus's critical role in remembering past events.
As reviewed in 2007 in an article published in Nature Reviews Neuroscience, key insights have also come from neuroimaging studies in humans in which researchers monitor the patterns of brain activation while subjects are asked to remember a personal experience from their past or imagine a plausible event in their future. Study participants might be cued by a noun for both of these conditions (e.g., "mountain" or "cat").

Those studies show that remembering episodic memories from the past as well as imagining future scenarios engage the same widespread network of brain areas, including not only the hippocampus and some of the surrounding structures in the brain's temporal lobe, but also the medial prefrontal cortex and regions toward the back of the brain, including the precuneus and the retrosplenial cortices.

Those neuroimaging results provide new insight into the widespread network of brain structures, including the hippocampus, which is involved in both recalling personal episodic memories from the past and constructing or imagining possible scenarios in the future.

A sense of place

My favorite evidence supporting the idea that the hippocampus is involved in imagining future events doesn't come from studying people, but rather rodents. One of the most striking patterns of neural activity in the rodent hippocampus is in their hippocampal place cells. Their discovery, by John O'Keefe of University College, London, was recognized with the 2014 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine.

Place cells respond with brief bursts of electrical activity, called action potentials or spikes, whenever the rat is in a particular location in its environment. The part of the environment where a place cell fires is called the cell's place field. When the rat is running down a particular alleyway or arm on a maze, instruments can record groups of place cells that fire in sequence as the rat runs through its particular place fields.

When imaged between bouts of running (either when the rat is just being still or sleeping), the rat's hippocampus actually replays those same spatial trajectories from the same sequences of place cells that were active when the rat was running. This phenomenon is called hippocampal replay. The replay typically happens at a much faster speed than the original sequence. However, the pattern is the same, and replay is thought to be involved in the strengthening spatial memory.

But recent evidence provided a new and unexpected twist to hippocampal activity. In 2011 a study published in the journal Nature, showed that rodent hippocampal cells not only exhibit replay of spatial information from past events, but if you closely examine hippocampal activity during those rest periods, you also see patterns of activity that predict some of the patterns of activity that will be experienced in the future. Note that I'm not talking about the neural basis of ESP but rather the hippocampal network seems to be projecting or "playing" future possible spatial scenarios based on its past experience, some of which actually occur.

This study identified this phenomenon by first recording the activity of hippocampal cells as rats became familiar with one part (Part A) of a spatial maze where lots of place cells and replay events were active. During the exploration of Part A, there was also a part of the maze that was blocked off, and the rats never experienced the other part (Part B). When the rats finally saw Part B of the maze, the experimenters discovered that some place-cell activity seen in the rest period, before Part B was ever revealed, actually predicted the pattern of activity seen when the rat was able to explore Part B of the maze.

This phenomenon is called hippocampal preplay and suggests the hippocampus is not only replaying spatial events it had experienced before (memory), but also seems to be playing out possible scenarios that could occur some time in the future (imagination). Those hippocampal preplay events are based on knowledge of the current environment and form a framework for future neural signals representing those future events.

Now, we cannot know if those rats are sitting there imagining the beautiful tropical beach that might be on the other side of the blocked arm on the maze, but the pattern of neural activity suggests that some of these future possibilities are seen in the pattern of normal hippocampal activity. This phenomenon is similar to the data showing the important role of the human hippocampus in future thinking or imagination.

How does this relate to my observation that my imagination and creativity seemed to improve along with my increased exercise regime? If exercise enhanced my hippocampal neurogenesis, it might have enhanced not only my memory function (past thinking), but my imagination as well (future thinking). This is a fascinating possibility that has not, to my knowledge, ever been tested in people, but is one of the questions we are investigating in my lab.

So, what is the astonishing truth about exercise? Current neuroscience research suggests it may have even deeper and more profound cognitive effects than even the most optimistic articles you read in the popular press.

New research suggests that exercise not only improves your mood, attention and memory, but could also boost your creativity by enhancing your ability to imagine the future in new and exciting ways — a great motivator to get to the gym.

Follow all of the Expert Voices issues and debates — and become part of the discussion — on Facebook, Twitter and Google+. The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher. This version of the article was originally published on Live Science.

Yowbarb

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Re: Mental Fitness during end-time and after-time
« Reply #18 on: June 11, 2015, 11:50:10 PM »
Great article, ilinda!
 :)

Yowbarb

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Re: Mental Fitness during end-time and after-time
« Reply #19 on: June 11, 2015, 11:51:55 PM »
Four natural antidepressants

Socrates

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I'm sorry; is your brain okay...?
« Reply #20 on: August 06, 2016, 06:04:42 AM »
The brain is an organ.

Wait; let it set in...
Organs have specific needs; some are about iodine, some about niacin, others focus on zinc or chromium or whatever.
Your brain needs good fats, iodine and lithium to function properly. You need not go running to a therapist when your diet is deficient!!! Your therapist will HAPPILY take your money for years on end, offering you psycho babble and psycho theory until both your ears bleed... but your brain is an organ that can't function properly without certain nutritional basics and all the talk in the word can't mitigate that.

Jorge Flechas is an expert on iodine. He TEACHES DOCTORS on such matters. He has read all the (mainstream) research on iodine in relation to mental health. And he will tell you that iodine deficiency leads to schizophrenia. But 95+% of folks suffer from iodine deficiency...;are 95% of folks schizo?
What do you think...?
Do you see people whining against politcs but bothering to vote?
Do you see people whining about doctors but running to them when their throat hurts?
Do you see people worrying about toxins but standing in line to inject their children with vaccines?
Have you also met one of these people who go on and on over being clean but then do something like wipe their kitchen counter with the same cloth that's been lying their for days, gathering and spreading germs everywhere? These people will actually attack you for not washing your hands 20 times a day!
I think you see 'schizos  everywhere but because they've become so common, you think it's the normal way of things.
It is not. It comes from a PHYSICAL deficiency. Physical, not psychological.

James Wilson wrote a book called Adrenal Fatigue. He's another one of those doctors who teaches doctors... When you're talking burnout, you're talking adrenal fatigue. Hey, if your liver is in bad shape [also very common], you may find yourself low on energy and irritable, but when you find yourself crying all the time over 'nothing', you need to start looking into mineral deficiencies. You do NOT need to be running to psycho therapists.
Before you EVER run to a psycho therapist or psychologist, you should check that it's not your brain (organ) or your liver that's actually bothering you. 'Cause, hell, if you bring that to a shrink, you will be paying for years of therapy without making any progress. Why? Since it's usually about the organ's needs that need first be met.

You also don't need to be doing meditation, mantras or what have you. Look at it like this:
When you're bodybuilding you know you mainly need the following 3 things:
- workouts
- good nutrition
- enough sleep
That's BODY building. That's physical. Like the brain.
Now, if you were to talk to a bodybuilder about mental exercises, (some supposed but unscientific) genetics, upbringing, gurus, or drugs, that bodybuilder might rightly reply:
Did you make sure you got enough sleep, good food and work out well first?
Because if you can't even walk, there's no point in trying to run [quote from Arnold]. All the details in the world will not make up for BASIC deficiencies.

Can you read?
Can you focus?
Can you be consistent?
Can you follow through?
What if your abilities in such areas were mainly PHYSICAL? 'Cause they are...

For instance, you can try to read all the books you like but you're still going to need a working brain and working eyes, right? The basics. But eyes are obvious; it's obvious if your eyes aren't working properly since they won't focus... But what if your BRAIN won't focus?! Your eyes are an organ and so is the brain. But we get that when it comes to eyes but when it comes to brain we bring in all kinds of other things that may at some level apply BUT ONLY IF THE BASICS APPLY FIRST.



So, talking about survival; what if you TALK about prepping but you don't follow through; lack of 'character' or lack of nutrients?! I'll bet 99% of folks would say the former and never even consider the latter. For one, because their brains lack consistency, they don't think straight. Also, this matter is never discussed in the mainstream, just like psychologists and shrinks talk about drugs and therapy but never about diet. [???]
When it comes to the brain we're still living in the dark ages. Basic concepts of health and sanity lie completely ignored and people focus on side issues that should only matter AFTER you've taken care of business.

Try these things and see if you don't immediately notice a difference:
- take 2 or 3 tablespoons of good quality oil [olive, coconut, etc.]. You will sleep better. So do that every day.
- put some Lugol's iodine or other iodine on your skin. (Don't do it late at night because you won't be able to sleep; your brain will be too active.) Follow a protocol to heal any iodine/iodate deficiencies you might have.
- Go to EBay and get yourself some lithium orotate; you need daily lithium for a healthy brain and agricultural soils today don't offer you what you need.

Also:
- get rid of all mercury fillings; mercury is a neural toxin. My brain is working much better since i got rid of all that in 2009! Eat brazil nuts daily to keep the mercury moving out of the body.
- look to your hormonal health. A lack of testosterone, for instance, is not just about libido; it's also about drive and a will to live. There are chemical oestrogenes EVERYWHERE nowadays, so stay away from beer [hops is the most oestrogenic herb in the world!], anything bottled in plastic [water, coke, etc.] and eat and drink things that support hormonal health and heal hormonal imbalance.

Hey, ultimately, just look at it like this: if you're doing drugs or sleeping pills, how well is your thinking?
The brain organ needs to be working before anything like meditation or reading or even thinking can help you. Look to the brain organ first. The rest can only follow from there. No instinct, emotion or inspiration can take the place of a properly functioning brain.
What are you without a brain?!

I have myself done and do the following for my brain:
- got rid of mercury (and avoid mercury sources like vaccines); i eat brazil nuts daily; these bind mercury and allow the body to naturally eliminate it [source: Atom Bergstrom].
- i make sure i get enough fats in my diet, particularly high quality ones
- I cured myself of burnout by making my own mead with herbal teas and things like molasses for minerals
- i have been drinking distilled water since about the year 2000 (i avoid water from tap or plastic)
- i've been taking nascent iodine for over a year now, according to a protocol by Robert Von
- I try to eat beetroot daily (for hormonal support)
- I focus on a high degree of omega 3 and 6 fats whenever possible [eating things like chia seeds]
- i have loads of seasalt and add things like magnesiumchloride [salt] and MSM to my water and drinks
- i take lithium orotate regularly
- i eat loads of fruit in the morning to support elimination and hydration
Such things i believe belong with life's basics. The age we live in demands them of us.

Also notice what i have NOT mentioned:
- positive attitude/thinking
- meditation
- tricks
- drugs
- family or friends
Such things FOLLOW AFTER you take care of business and make sure your brain can function properly. First things first. If you make plans or talk or network or turn to 'god' without a working brain, what's going to come of it?
If you don't do what needs to be done, your brain won't do things like accept what needs to be done...
« Last Edit: August 06, 2016, 11:31:33 AM by Socrates »
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ilinda

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Re: I'm sorry; is your brain okay...?
« Reply #21 on: August 08, 2016, 06:30:19 PM »
The brain is an organ.

Wait; let it set in...
Organs have specific needs; some are about iodine, some about niacin, others focus on zinc or chromium or whatever.
Your brain needs good fats, iodine and lithium to function properly. You need not go running to a therapist when your diet is deficient!!! Your therapist will HAPPILY take your money for years on end, offering you psycho babble and psycho theory until both your ears bleed... but your brain is an organ that can't function properly without certain nutritional basics and all the talk in the word can't mitigate that.

Jorge Flechas is an expert on iodine. He TEACHES DOCTORS on such matters. He has read all the (mainstream) research on iodine in relation to mental health. And he will tell you that iodine deficiency leads to schizophrenia. But 95+% of folks suffer from iodine deficiency...;are 95% of folks schizo?
What do you think...?
Do you see people whining against politcs but bothering to vote?
Do you see people whining about doctors but running to them when their throat hurts?
Do you see people worrying about toxins but standing in line to inject their children with vaccines?
Have you also met one of these people who go on and on over being clean but then do something like wipe their kitchen counter with the same cloth that's been lying their for days, gathering and spreading germs everywhere? These people will actually attack you for not washing your hands 20 times a day!
I think you see 'schizos  everywhere but because they've become so common, you think it's the normal way of things.
It is not. It comes from a PHYSICAL deficiency. Physical, not psychological.

James Wilson wrote a book called Adrenal Fatigue. He's another one of those doctors who teaches doctors... When you're talking burnout, you're talking adrenal fatigue. Hey, if your liver is in bad shape [also very common], you may find yourself low on energy and irritable, but when you find yourself crying all the time over 'nothing', you need to start looking into mineral deficiencies. You do NOT need to be running to psycho therapists.
Before you EVER run to a psycho therapist or psychologist, you should check that it's not your brain (organ) or your liver that's actually bothering you. 'Cause, hell, if you bring that to a shrink, you will be paying for years of therapy without making any progress. Why? Since it's usually about the organ's needs that need first be met.

You also don't need to be doing meditation, mantras or what have you. Look at it like this:
When you're bodybuilding you know you mainly need the following 3 things:
- workouts
- good nutrition
- enough sleep
That's BODY building. That's physical. Like the brain.
Now, if you were to talk to a bodybuilder about mental exercises, (some supposed but unscientific) genetics, upbringing, gurus, or drugs, that bodybuilder might rightly reply:
Did you make sure you got enough sleep, good food and work out well first?
Because if you can't even walk, there's no point in trying to run [quote from Arnold]. All the details in the world will not make up for BASIC deficiencies.

Can you read?
Can you focus?
Can you be consistent?
Can you follow through?
What if your abilities in such areas were mainly PHYSICAL? 'Cause they are...

For instance, you can try to read all the books you like but you're still going to need a working brain and working eyes, right? The basics. But eyes are obvious; it's obvious if your eyes aren't working properly since they won't focus... But what if your BRAIN won't focus?! Your eyes are an organ and so is the brain. But we get that when it comes to eyes but when it comes to brain we bring in all kinds of other things that may at some level apply BUT ONLY IF THE BASICS APPLY FIRST.



So, talking about survival; what if you TALK about prepping but you don't follow through; lack of 'character' or lack of nutrients?! I'll bet 99% of folks would say the former and never even consider the latter. For one, because their brains lack consistency, they don't think straight. Also, this matter is never discussed in the mainstream, just like psychologists and shrinks talk about drugs and therapy but never about diet. [???]
When it comes to the brain we're still living in the dark ages. Basic concepts of health and sanity lie completely ignored and people focus on side issues that should only matter AFTER you've taken care of business.

Try these things and see if you don't immediately notice a difference:
- take 2 or 3 tablespoons of good quality oil [olive, coconut, etc.]. You will sleep better. So do that every day.
- put some Lugol's iodine or other iodine on your skin. (Don't do it late at night because you won't be able to sleep; your brain will be too active.) Follow a protocol to heal any iodine/iodate deficiencies you might have.
- Go to EBay and get yourself some lithium orotate; you need daily lithium for a healthy brain and agricultural soils today don't offer you what you need.

Also:
- get rid of all mercury fillings; mercury is a neural toxin. My brain is working much better since i got rid of all that in 2009! Eat brazil nuts daily to keep the mercury moving out of the body.
- look to your hormonal health. A lack of testosterone, for instance, is not just about libido; it's also about drive and a will to live. There are chemical oestrogenes EVERYWHERE nowadays, so stay away from beer [hops is the most oestrogenic herb in the world!], anything bottled in plastic [water, coke, etc.] and eat and drink things that support hormonal health and heal hormonal imbalance.

Hey, ultimately, just look at it like this: if you're doing drugs or sleeping pills, how well is your thinking?
The brain organ needs to be working before anything like meditation or reading or even thinking can help you. Look to the brain organ first. The rest can only follow from there. No instinct, emotion or inspiration can take the place of a properly functioning brain.
What are you without a brain?!

I have myself done and do the following for my brain:
- got rid of mercury (and avoid mercury sources like vaccines); i eat brazil nuts daily; these bind mercury and allow the body to naturally eliminate it [source: Atom Bergstrom].
- i make sure i get enough fats in my diet, particularly high quality ones
- I cured myself of burnout by making my own mead with herbal teas and things like molasses for minerals
- i have been drinking distilled water since about the year 2000 (i avoid water from tap or plastic)
- i've been taking nascent iodine for over a year now, according to a protocol by Robert Von
- I try to eat beetroot daily (for hormonal support)
- I focus on a high degree of omega 3 and 6 fats whenever possible [eating things like chia seeds]
- i have loads of seasalt and add things like magnesiumchloride [salt] and MSM to my water and drinks
- i take lithium orotate regularly
- i eat loads of fruit in the morning to support elimination and hydration
Such things i believe belong with life's basics. The age we live in demands them of us.

Also notice what i have NOT mentioned:
- positive attitude/thinking
- meditation
- tricks
- drugs
- family or friends
Such things FOLLOW AFTER you take care of business and make sure your brain can function properly. First things first. If you make plans or talk or network or turn to 'god' without a working brain, what's going to come of it?
If you don't do what needs to be done, your brain won't do things like accept what needs to be done...
You covered so much territory that it's difficult to comment w/o writing a novel.  But I'll try anyway.

It is so true that what we eat and drink and get injected with is waaaayyyy more important than most think.  And yeah, people often run to the nearest therapist for psychotherapy or whatever when many times all they need to do is eat real food and go cold-turkey off the processed and junk "food".

It's probably true that most (Americans at least) people are iodine deficient.  They use fluoride toothpaste, fluoridated water, fluoride-containing pharmaceuticals, brominated breads, chlorinated water and a myriad of substances that contain elements that interfere with iodine, particularly bromides and fluorides.

We may not NEED meditation, but some forms of meditation are beneficial in increasing our neuroplasticity.  Plus, meditation is voluntary, and I, for one, wish I had more time for it, but then again maybe it's poor self-discipline.  One problem is that those whose brains are not functioning properly do not know it!

And yes, I would advise anyone with mercury or "silver" dental fillings to have them removed by a biological dentist who has the proper technology for safely removing and handling the mercury amalgam.  I had all my mercury fillings removed in 2012 and it is one of the best and wisest things I've ever done, and it will hopefully help me regain health that was damaged by my earlier dentists who placed mercury inches from my brain every chance they got, from early childhood till 2012.

Your comment about Brazil nuts is intriguing, as that is new to me, that they can help remove mercury.  Wonderful news. 

Socrates

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Re: Mental Fitness during end-time and after-time
« Reply #22 on: August 09, 2016, 02:58:24 AM »
Much more on (mercury) detox at my online database.
Congrats on getting that stuff out of your mouth. It's a big deal if we're to believe the research. We've all been subjected to such madness. We are truly all victims but we're only about victim attitude if we let that stop us from doing what's necessary.
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Yowbarb

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Re: Mental Fitness during end-time and after-time
« Reply #23 on: August 12, 2016, 11:39:31 AM »
Socrates, excellent posts and info!
ilinda, thank you too!
- Yowbarb