Author Topic: Starting a One-Acre Permaculture Food Forest, from Chet Womack, Survival Summit  (Read 2295 times)

Yowbarb

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Yowbarb Note: This email and video was sent to me as a gift from Chet Womach, one of the presenters and organizers of the recent Survival Summit. (I set up temporary Boards with all the videos, some images and links images, here on the Town Hall a few weeks ago.)
I thanked Chet and asked him if it was OK for me to share this on the Planet X Town hall and he said "Fine, that would be good!" The
video link is within Chet's email but here it is:

Survival Summits are from the PrepperProject group. http://theprepperproject.com/

VIDEO Starting a One-Acre Permaculture Food Forest 

LINK:  http://youtu.be/EN5bSxx6hlI
...
Sent to me, from  info@thesurvivalsummit.com 

Hey Barb Townsend,

About 2 years ago I asked myself a question you probably have asked yourself...
"If everything went to hell in a hand basket, how could I grow all the food to feed my family?"

I was green around the gills when it came to growing stuff, and as it turns out, its damn hard to grow food if you've never gardened in your life before like me.

And to make matters worse, I didn't want to just learn how to garden, I wanted to learn how to garden SUSTAINABLY. And that's not easier by the way. I was scared...

Because everyone told me that gardening in good times takes at least 5 years to get the hang of, and I really didn't know how much time I had left to learn... so I did what I always do when I start to learn a new discipline - I hired a coach.

Hiring a coach is the single, fastest way (and I'd also argue the cheapest) to get fast results when it comes to mastering a new skill. Why? Because if you put a bunch of people in a room, no matter the discipline, the greatest master in that room will not be the one with the most God given talent, but the one who has failed the most.

It is that person who has failed the most, that learns the deeper lessons of his craft that can only be taught from personal experience.

A coach will dramatically speed up your learning curve by helping guide you PAST many failure points a beginner would never notice.  So you get faster results, with less  effort, and can even save money by avoiding costly mistakes. Mistakes that could really derail your progress.

NOTE:  If you'll allow me a quick, side note... if your personal failures ever start to beat you up, you should go and watch this video from one of the greatest masters of his craft, talking about this very thing.  Its one of the two videos I like to watch when I'm in need of inspiration.   
Don't forget as you watch this video, that this guy had arguably the greatest coaches of all time helping him.

--> Click Here For The Video
Starting a One-Acre Permaculture Food Forest    9:59   23,319 Views

Link:  http://youtu.be/EN5bSxx6hlI
...
Chet's email, continued:


There's also a great book on this topic... but I'll share it with you another time so I don't get too derailed 
here ;-) Anyways... back to my Gardening Coach.

Turns out, there's actually a name for a Gardening Coach that knows how to grow food sustainably... they're called Permaculture Designers.  And as luck would have it, there was one with personal experience of growing food in my climate less then 20 minutes from me.

So I told her my goals...

"I want to grow enough food to feed my growing family of 4 COMPLETELY from my own land"

And she designed me a system for doing just that; and I thought would be helpful for you to see.

I actually took a cool video of it from a flying helicopter that I think might open up your eyes to what some good coaching/planning could do for your own abilities to produce more food from your property.

Here's the video:  http://youtu.be/EN5bSxx6hlI
 
Now... I'm not going to claim that this system was perfect.  We have made some major improvements that I'll be sharing with you as soon as I edit them together.

And of course, like what always happens, I made a handful of mistakes from not listening to my designers advice as closely as I should have. With that said, I still think its a video that could help get your food growing ideas churning as spring draws closer.

I hope you enjoy!

Sincerely,

Chet Womach   
TheSurvivalSummit.com
 
This message was sent to Barb_townsend@verizon.net from:
The Survival Summit | 1818 W. Francis Ave. #200 | Spokane, WA 99205
   

...................................

R.R. Book

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Barb, Thank you so much for this.  I found the companion film here (not the drone camera part, but the diagram): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JhyWTQlr3dQ

You have solved one of my greatest dilemmas in microfarming: what to do in the north for perpetual legumes since recent experiments with phaseolus polystachios (common wild bean that is the ancestor of our modern annual beans) have been so disappointing.  I am thrilled to have learned about the siberian pea plant from Chet's film, thanks to your link.

Many blessings!

Yowbarb

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Barb, Thank you so much for this.  I found the companion film here (not the drone camera part, but the diagram): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JhyWTQlr3dQ

You have solved one of my greatest dilemmas in microfarming: what to do in the north for perpetual legumes since recent experiments with phaseolus polystachios (common wild bean that is the ancestor of our modern annual beans) have been so disappointing.  I am thrilled to have learned about the siberian pea plant from Chet's film, thanks to your link.

Many blessings!

R.R. Book! I am so happy that posting about Chet's sites and videos has led to your learning new things.
Really glad. :)
His site really gave me some hope for farming in the times to come...
- Barb Townsend

Yowbarb

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Barb, Thank you so much for this.  I found the companion film here (not the drone camera part, but the diagram): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JhyWTQlr3dQ

You have solved one of my greatest dilemmas in microfarming: what to do in the north for perpetual legumes since recent experiments with phaseolus polystachios (common wild bean that is the ancestor of our modern annual beans) have been so disappointing.  I am thrilled to have learned about the siberian pea plant from Chet's film, thanks to your link.

Many blessings!

Wow! I had not seen this diagram and instructions! Great stuff!
:)

R.R. Book

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Am including an educational link from the Plants for a Future database (pfaf.org) for more info on the Siberian pea plant.  Have been using this database since it was first created, and can say that they routinely post toxicity warnings on pretty much all legumes, as all can be toxic before cooking due to indigestible proteins.  Just mentioning that so that folks are not frightened away from this plant by the warning, which is much more mildly stated than the one for the sweet pea plant, for example.

http://www.pfaf.org/user/plant.aspx?LatinName=Caragana+arborescens

Socrates

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Re: PFAF
« Reply #5 on: April 20, 2017, 09:24:09 AM »
downloaded the whole PFAF archive years ago for future reference!
survival database
location, civilisation reboot, PERMACULTURE, postcataclysmic soil, Growing Soil 1.01

Yowbarb

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Re: PFAF
« Reply #6 on: April 20, 2017, 12:34:49 PM »
downloaded the whole PFAF archive years ago for future reference!

Good thinking! :)

Yowbarb

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Am including an educational link from the Plants for a Future database (pfaf.org) for more info on the Siberian pea plant.  Have been using this database since it was first created, and can say that they routinely post toxicity warnings on pretty much all legumes, as all can be toxic before cooking due to indigestible proteins.  Just mentioning that so that folks are not frightened away from this plant by the warning, which is much more mildly stated than the one for the sweet pea plant, for example.

http://www.pfaf.org/user/plant.aspx?LatinName=Caragana+arborescens

Good info...

ilinda

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Since this is a PERMACULTURE area, I'm posting notice of a wonderful article in April, 2017 ACRES U.S.A., entitled "Fringe Benefits", by Werner Wanderslegen, Ph.D.

The article chronicles the experiences of the author in trying to figure out why agricultural soils seem to be so less ful of life, etc., that the so-called marginal soils adjacent to the fields, marginal soils which may be in inner city, full of weeds, etc., or rural, under fences, or in the woods.  He details the hyphae in the top four inches of soil and how tilling destroys it--explaining in good detail how it doesn't completely kill it, but knocks it back to square one, where it must try again each spring to grow anew, only to get broken up AGAIN by the tiller or tractor.  He incorporates more details that I can here, but summarizes it by saying that by no tilling and no fertilizing, etc., one can grow good, healthful, and plentiful food.

What I like about the article is that he does not use the term "permaculture", although there is a lot in common there, but some folks are turned off just by the word Permaculture!  He ends by saying, "this article doesn't finish with a traditional bibliography because it doesn't need one.  All the scientific information presented was collected from the public market of ideas.  It has been there for decades and can be reached with a few clicks; it is true that it was all scattered around like the pieces of a puzzle on the floor.  I didn't discover anything new;  I simply took the scattered pieces and put them together on the table.  I only added a new perspective."

R.R. Book

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Thanks for the heads up Ilinda!  The magazine can be obtained on-line at this site for non-subscribers not near a news stand: http://www.acresusa.com/magazine