Author Topic: priorities, getting started, and fundamental questions  (Read 4299 times)

Socrates

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Re: dictionaries & encyclopaedias
« Reply #15 on: February 02, 2017, 01:03:28 PM »
I would add a good stash of dictionaries of various degrees of complexity.

Good Oxford and a magnifying glass to go with it. Some usages can only be found there.
Some English - other language dictionaries.

Encyclopedias, even though everything will change they would be a point of reference.

I'd say if a person knows their bug out destination they could do a proper job of packing and burying books for later use.
All good points.
At some point it came to me to look for a picture dictionary and it turned out Oxford puts out one of those. That means that even if i myself don't survive, or if nobody speaking English is around to enjoy my books, that someone at some point might be able to figure out how to read English anyway (and hopefully support mankind that way).

I have a number of magnifying glasses, as well as some fresnel lenses. They can help make fire, too.

I have both maritime and technical encyclopaedias that go into great detail concerning these topics. I bought 'm cheap.

I have thought that burying books carefully is a worthwhile pursuit. They should be wedged in among bedrock and covered in cement, preferably placed in water-tight containers. The first years won't be about reading or researching anyway. Although some books to kill time and break monotony could turn out to keep one from going crazy, so maybe a good idea to keep some novels where you can easily get to them.
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ilinda

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Re: priorities, getting started, and fundamental questions
« Reply #16 on: February 02, 2017, 02:39:01 PM »
Socrates, interesting tip of yelling to help stop a heart attack.
I have found that getting mad and slamming my hand down on the table helped me not choke to death (was by myself.)
The thought of dying by myself in such a dumb way did make me mad and I slammed my hand down on the table!
Something about that movement opened up airways just enough so that doing the heimlich on myself and tiny sips of water did the trick.
One method to help the heart I saw, was the person submerges his face in lukewarm water.
On a related note, someone once told me that one could stop an asthma attack by throwing cold water in/on the face of the victim, but I'm not sure that WOULD work, so would never try it. 

Regarding choking, the method of getting angry and slamming your hand down, would most likely cause a bit of instantaneous exhalation, maybe just enough to help expel anything in the airways.  Good to hear it worked.

Socrates

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Re: priorities; setting up shop
« Reply #17 on: March 08, 2017, 11:38:15 PM »
So, it's 'spring' 2017 and i'm getting ready to relocate at the end of summer. What do i bring along...?

I'm working my butt off for little pay; i hope to be able to save about € 500/month for about 4 months and then hightail it outta here.
That's little funds but i've been saying for years that it's not about being rich; it's about knowing what to know...

What is my first order of business when i arrive at my chosen location? Well, let's talk about why i chose said location to begin with; nearby ancient caves (that have stood the test of time), an inviting climate [including during an ice age] and not particularly buffeted by radiation [i.e. nearby nuclear plants]. Going on...

I have my seeds and enough money to buy in stores of calories [cheese, sausages, etc. etc.]; the seeds are genetic information i need but there are 2 other kinds: bacterial cultures [for things like cheeses] and livestock.
Livestock is a whole problem on it's own: how to feed them, how to keep them, etc. etc. On the other hand, as Guns, Germs and Steel points out, about 30 domestic animals stem from the Tigris/Euphrates region, along with all kinds of vegetation we take for granted, like grapes. Oh, i wonder why...

Anyway, so besides a good dog [y'all know i'm talking about Ridgebacks], we're talking goats, bees... bla bla; i've covered this many times. Alternative: no calories and death... When you're talking survival, you're talking livestock!
So, somehow i've managed to acquire appropriate livestock and stock up on things to keep them alive [hay, corn to sprout and feed to the scobies, barrels of honey to feed to the bees, etc.]; What's next?

After the stores of calorically-rich foods i need, the next order of business is heat. And that means... building a rocket mass heater. Otherwise there's no way i'm going to be able to collect enough materials to keep me warm for the next couple of years. A RMH will burn 5 or 10% of what state-of-the-art heaters will. Nuff said.

There are some flora that i can't collect seeds from readily, like the vetiver and mangrove; they are key species in my book, one helping to establish terraces [a key farming tactic], the other for making use of coastlines.

I have my library that i've spent the past years putting together; these books need to be packaged carefully so they will stay dry and are easy to carry. I will put them somewhere safe, perhaps bury them and if need be cover in a layer of concrete.

I have a stash of glass; how would i brew and stock finished brew otherwise? Fermented drinks are not only a basic form of nutrition enjoyed by all long-lived cultures throughout the world and in all ages [quite the recommendation right there], but it offers relief in times of stress, depression, grief and pain.
Similarly, there will need be some earthenware pots for things like fermenting miso. These are also redundancies for brewing liquids. Either way, both glass and ceramics will basically keep forever and are a solid investment. It's important to store them in a way that even a megaquake will not destroy them.

There are many tools to consider; i will focus on a few:
- fresnel lenses; these will make fire or even furnace temperatures from the power of the Sun alone; an awesome technology that will probably not be possible to recreate for millennia, though it is cheap today.
- besides a good knife, i'm thinking good quality crossbow; good for shooting rabbits and dear with, as well as for self-defense. And god knows it'll be easier to fashion arrows than it will be to make gunpowder.

If at all possible, i will need to find a good source of soil and collect some in a location that is safe from megagales. I fear that mega-storms/-gales/-hurricanes will carry away all topsoil just as they carry away all trees. We all take for granted that there's always dirt everywhere but after TSHTF, you can't be sure about anything. And what are you going to plant your seeds in if you can't find soil? You can grow soil (if you know how) but that could take years, especially to grow enough.
Cow dung is wonderful for planting seeds in and good dirt can be dug up from any forrest. If such things are stashed in a cave or in a crevice [perhaps covered in a layer of concrete], one can be sure of having this basic requisite for growing food.


I have a good location, my library, some basic tools, genetic information and knowledge how to grow soil (which is more than conventional man has going for him...). Besides the tools i buy, in the end it all boils down to knowledge in some form or other. But i say the most important knowledge, both for survival and for the future, concerns knowledge about people; what makes them tick, how they get turned into monsters and why one should keep them away. Both nature and animals are not actively seeking to destroy you, but people, that's a different story; if they find you, if they know that you're there and where to find you, they will come and take what's yours and hurt, kill and eat you.
On a lighter note, they will all likely die in the months following TEOTWAWKI, as they are ignorant about radiation and unprepared for what is to come. So just staying out of their way for a while should suffice to overcome the threat they pose.
« Last Edit: November 14, 2017, 09:51:03 AM by Socrates »
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Socrates

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Re: setting up shop
« Reply #18 on: March 09, 2017, 09:29:02 AM »
i forget...

- cans of olive oil
- maybe a liter of MMS
- cans of fish
- a few tubs of One World Whey

anything else i missed?
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ilinda

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Re: priorities; setting up shop
« Reply #19 on: March 09, 2017, 03:08:34 PM »
So, it's 'spring' 2017 and i'm getting ready to relocate at the end of summer. What do i bring along...?

I'm working my butt off for little pay; i hope to be able to save about € 500/month for about 4 months and then hightail it outta here.
That's little funds but i've been saying for years that it's not about being rich; it's about knowing what to know...

What is my first order of business when i arrive at my chosen location? Well, let's talk about why i chose said location to begin with; nearby ancient caves (that have stood the test of time), an inviting climate [including during an ice age] and not particularly buffeted by radiation [i.e. nearby nuclear plants]. Going on...

I have my seeds and enough money to buy in stores of calories [cheese, sausages, etc. etc.]; the seeds are genetic information i need but there are 2 other kinds: bacterial cultures [for things like cheeses] and livestock.
Livestock is a whole problem on it's own: how to feed them, how to keep them, etc. etc. On the other hand, as Guns, Germs and Steel points out, about 30 domestic animals stem from the Tigris/Euphrates region, along with all kinds of vegetation we take for granted, like grapes. Oh, i wonder why...

Anyway, so besides a good dog [y'all know i'm talking about Ridgebacks], we're talking goats, bees... bla bla; i've covered this many times. Alternative: no calories and death... When you're talking survival, you're talking livestock!
So, somehow i've managed to acquire appropriate livestock and stock up on things to keep them alive [hay, corn to sprout and feed to the scobies, barrels of honey to feed to the bees, etc.]; What's next?

After the stores of calorically-rich foods i need, the next order of business is heat. And that means... building a rocket mass heater. Otherwise there's no way i'm going to be able to collect enough materials to keep me warm for the next couple of years. A RMH will burn 5 or 10% of what state-of-the-art heaters will. Nuff said.

There are some flora that i can't collect seeds from readily, like the vetiver and mangrove; they are key species in my book, one helping to establish terraces [a key farming tactic], the other for making use of coastlines.

I have my library that i've spent the past years putting together; these books need to be packaged carefully so they will stay dry and are easy to carry. I will put them somewhere safe, perhaps bury them and if need be cover in a layer of concrete.

I have a stash of glass; how would i brew and stock finished brew otherwise? Fermented drinks are not only a basic form of nutrition enjoyed by all long-lived cultures throughout the world and in all ages [quite the recommendation right there], but it offers relief in times of stress, depression and grief.
Similarly, there will need be some earthenware pots for things like fermenting miso. These are also redundancies for brewing liquids. Either way, both glass and ceramics will basically keep forever and are a solid investment. It's important to store them in a way that even a megaquake will not destroy them.

There are many tools to consider; i will focus on a few:
- fresnel lenses; these will make fire or even furnace temperatures from the power of the Sun alone; an awesome technology that will probably not be possible to recreate for millennia, though it is cheap today.
- besides a good knife, i'm thinking good quality crossbow; good for shooting rabbits and dear with, as well as for self-defense. And god knows it'll be easier to fashion arrows than it will be to make gunpowder.

If at all possible, i will need to find a good source of soil and collect some in a location that is safe from megagales. I fear that mega-storms/-gales/-hurricanes will carry away all topsoil just as they carry away all trees. We all take for granted that there's always dirt everywhere but after TSHTF, you can't be sure about anything. And what are you going to plant your seeds in if you can't find soil? You can grow soil (if you know how) but that could take years, especially to grow enough.
Cow dung is wonderful for planting seeds in and good dirt can be dug up from any forrest. If such things are stashed in a cave or in a crevice [perhaps covered in a layer of concrete], one can be sure of having this basic requisite for growing food.


I have a good location, my library, some basic tools, genetic information and knowledge how to grow soil (which is more than conventional man has going for him...). Besides the tools i buy, in the end it all boils down to knowledge in some form or other. But i say the most important knowledge, both for survival and for the future, concerns knowledge about people; what makes them tick, how they get turned into monsters and why one should keep them away. Both nature and animals are not actively seeking to destroy you, but people, that's a different story; if they find you, if they know that you're there and where to find you, they will come and take what's yours and hurt, kill and eat you.
On a lighter note, they will all likely die in the months following TEOTWAWKI, as they are ignorant about radiation and unprepared for what is to come. So just staying out of their way for a while should suffice to overcome the threat they pose.
At least you're doing a lot of thinking and planning before bugging out.
One thing you've probably already thought of was how to keep your seeds dry.  They need to be as dry as matches, maybe drier.  Do you have any of those little packets of dessicant that is included with some products, and are labeled "Do Not Eat" (!).  They might help keep those seeds dry, especially if placed in ziplok bags with the seeds.

Also your books must not only be kept dry, but rodent proof.  I had a bunch of books stored in a metal trailer that I thought was rodent proof, but the mice climbed up the adjacent vegetation as it grew during the warmer weather and got in, and OMG what a bunch of ruined books they left.  Fortunately it was discovered early on, and it could have been a total catastrophe.  I find metal tins, whether small like cookies are sold in at Christmas time, or the larger ones that hold popcorn, and these are really nice for larger items you want rodent proofed.

There should be bat droppings in the cave(s), assuming it hasn't all been harvested to be sold as fertilizer.  Sometimes it's really deep.

As you already know, a crossbow would be much quieter than gunpowder, when thinking of your "signature".

A Master Gardener once told me that humanure will be safe after about three years of composting, so it's a good idea to start a second pile adjacent to the first, so that at the end of year one, you begin filling pile #2, then at end of year #2, start pile #3, so by the time you're starting your pile #4, you should have pile #1 ready for the garden, and once that pile is emptied into garden, then bed #4 goes there.  Etc.

Good luck.

Yowbarb

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Re: priorities, getting started, and fundamental questions
« Reply #20 on: March 09, 2017, 06:55:55 PM »
Socrates, interesting tip of yelling to help stop a heart attack.
I have found that getting mad and slamming my hand down on the table helped me not choke to death (was by myself.)
The thought of dying by myself in such a dumb way did make me mad and I slammed my hand down on the table!
Something about that movement opened up airways just enough so that doing the heimlich on myself and tiny sips of water did the trick.
One method to help the heart I saw, was the person submerges his face in lukewarm water.
On a related note, someone once told me that one could stop an asthma attack by throwing cold water in/on the face of the victim, but I'm not sure that WOULD work, so would never try it. 

Regarding choking, the method of getting angry and slamming your hand down, would most likely cause a bit of instantaneous exhalation, maybe just enough to help expel anything in the airways.  Good to hear it worked.

I will remember the cold water tip. Maybe it does work...

Yowbarb

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Re: dictionaries & encyclopaedias
« Reply #21 on: March 09, 2017, 06:58:03 PM »
I would add a good stash of dictionaries of various degrees of complexity.

Good Oxford and a magnifying glass to go with it. Some usages can only be found there.
Some English - other language dictionaries.

Encyclopedias, even though everything will change they would be a point of reference.

I'd say if a person knows their bug out destination they could do a proper job of packing and burying books for later use.
All good points.
At some point it came to me to look for a picture dictionary and it turned out Oxford puts out one of those. That means that even if i myself don't survive, or if nobody speaking English is around to enjoy my books, that someone at some point might be able to figure out how to read English anyway (and hopefully support mankind that way).

I have a number of magnifying glasses, as well as some fresnel lenses. They can help make fire, too.

I have both maritime and technical encyclopaedias that go into great detail concerning these topics. I bought 'm cheap.

I have thought that burying books carefully is a worthwhile pursuit. They should be wedged in among bedrock and covered in cement, preferably placed in water-tight containers. The first years won't be about reading or researching anyway. Although some books to kill time and break monotony could turn out to keep one from going crazy, so maybe a good idea to keep some novels where you can easily get to them.

I like your ideas about book caches.
Good to know about Oxford making a picture dictionary, too!
Simple translation dictionaries could be a real boon in the future, too.

Socrates

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Re: Oxford Picture Dictionary
« Reply #22 on: March 11, 2017, 12:13:43 PM »
Good to know about Oxford making a picture dictionary, too!
Y'know, that's just one of those things it took me years to get around to thinking about. At some point i'm like: "Hey, wouldn't it be great if there were something like a picture dictionary?"; then, after a bit, it hits me that i should Google that... and presto.

anything else i missed?
Also: cement; a bag of cement just costs a few bucks but it's something one can't really reproduce after TSHTF and it's such great stuff to have.
I remember being in this abandoned valley on La Gomera [what i call "my valley" to myself] and thinking: "Hey, with some cement here i could lay down a floor of flattish rocks underneath this waterfall and have a shower/outdoor 'bathroom' "...
But also for hydro works and the like. Another for instance: i read about these backward folks leading water to their field and how most of the water would sink into the dirt on the way to said field; now, cement could really help in stopping water from heading the wrong way. And it can really help in creating dams, just to name yet another wonderful application. And i've spent a lot of time trying to get water to flow where i wanted it to in this valley of mine and i can tell you from personal experience that water will eat away at whatever you throw in it's path that is not cement (or work it's way around, under or through it).
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Socrates

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Priorities in relation to time and other variables
« Reply #23 on: November 14, 2017, 11:21:41 AM »
Of course, preferably you dig in and hope your home prepping will suffice...
I myself have had (what i consider) a vision dream in which all my supplies were lost on a sinking ship; i consider this dream a warning not to count on being able to save what i'm able to source today. Whether the dream was 'spiritual' or not, i hold to it's warning of not putting all my eggs in the basket of counting on being able to hold onto preparations i can make today.

It could be biblical warnings of the end coming "as a thief in the night" should be taken pretty literally and when it's time to run, it's time to friggin' RUN FOR YOUR LIFE!!! [i.e. no time to retrieve BOB [bug out bag] or anything else you've not with you or on your person.
What would be your priorities in such a case?


I would like to consider the matter of priorities in relation to other situations, as well. Such as, what if you have one day to prepare?
What if you have a week to prepare?
What if you have a month to prepare?
What if you can carry nothing?
What if you can carry a BOB?
What if you can carry as much as you wish?

Each option has it's own options and, yeah, it can get confusing. It should be clear, though, that there's no point in mixing all options into some half-baked general average 'solution', for things that make perfect sense in one scenario are a complete waste of time and resources in another.


Today, i'd like to consider my favorite scenario: the worst-case one in which all (or nearly all) of your preps have gone for naught and you're basically left with the shirt on your back; what then?
It is then all about information; that which you have in your head, that which is part of your own personal experience and expertise, that which you potentially have locked away in books somewhere [caches] and that which is genetically part of whatever creatures you're able to save, keep with you and feed. Pfff...:
- knowledge
- experience / expertise
- books
- genetics
This scenario is therefore also about EDC preps [every day carry], i.e. what you actually have with you at all times.


So, say you're washed away by a flood of water [debris, mud and what have you] but manage to come out alive. On your person you have your clothes [though soaked] and things like a wallet and/or belt pouches.  That's it...
Enter worst case scenario for the worst case scenario prepper.
- you have a waterproof container with basic seeds [corn, cotton, bamboo, beets, beans, squash, chia, etc. etc.]
- there are miniature bibles that fit into a pocket; you might have a 'survival bible' with you [like the SAS handbook or one you put together yourself...]
- knife? [pouch? credit card folding option?]
- lighter? Magnesium rod? Fresnel lense [credit-card version]?
- etc. etc. etc. [i.e. use your imagination]

I have recently been viewing vlogs by Alone season 3 winner Zacher Fowler and thinking about what he could have done better...
Yeah, maybe you think that sounds conceited, but, basically, as a survivalist, he lost...
I mean, yeah, he won half a million dollars, but in the end he was not actually surviving, i.e. he could not have held out much longer. In fact, by his own estimate, he might have held on another month but basically he was already 'hanging on by a thread' after about 3 months. So, what might he have done to do better?

I do not mean to critisize, let alone tear down, Zach Fowler. In fact, i have been learning much from him and i admire his spirit, choices and experience. On the other hand, i recognize that he would ultimately not have survived if the Alone experiment had lasted much longer.
As true preppers, we must set the bar even higher...
Zach Fowler's attitude [according to his own assertions] was toward 'homesteading'. Now, homesteading commonly involves keeping livestock, since these provide necessary calories, particularly in inhospitable environments. However, he did not have any livestock. Instead, he focused on fishing. And in 87 days he caught about 30 fish...

Zachery Fowler is somewhat (in)famous on Alone for not choosing any rations as part of his 10 items to take with him into the wilderness. Now i will tell you something from my own personal experience with going into the wild for weeks at a time: if you lack the calories, you lack the energy and will to do what you must...
Yeah, he won Alone season 3, but might he not have fared better if he'd had the calories to take action in the first week (or weeks) that he was out there in new territory?
- one needs to scope one's environment
- one needs to landscape, build dams, hunt, set traps and/or find other resources
- one needs to establish a camp so one can sleep and isn't losing energy through (needless) cold, fatigue and sleep deprivation

It is true that one's body quickly turns to burning carbohydrates to burning fats, but this is accompanied by lethargy, low energy and slow action. But should one not be taking extra action during the transition into a new environment? I think so.
Zach Fowler's choice of tools was commendable, but i think he underestimated his body's need for fuel to actually use said tools. Therefore (i think) he would have been better off with more calories and fewer tools, in the end.

From a permaculture and health point of view, he might have been laying down terraces with good soil that might quickly have been offering vast amounts of vegetation to eat.
Also, he could have been putting long hours into building nets or cages in which to catch fish.
Or he might have been [again, putting long hours into] building dams or lagoons that attract the very fish he based his survival on (as well as digging up insects to feed to said fish to lure them into said lagoon).

In the end i think he saw himself as a kind of victim of his environment, rather than as a potential master of his environment. He caught 30 fish in 3 months. Though this caused him to win season 3, he lost from a survival point of view. However, much can be learned from his example.
For one, fish come to underwater vestiges that offer habitat, safety and forage. For instance,

certain concrete structures have been submersed to invite fish and other submarine life to congregate. Other factors that invite fish are things like shallow [i.e. warmer] water, insects [one might harvest] and other things that offer refuge and hiding.
Did Fowler (or others) go out looking for such places? I haven't heard of it [and perhaps they did not have the time, energy or options to do so].

Similarly, there are things one can do to soil to attract insects, seedlings, animals, etc.
In fact, foraging is a tactic that is only appropriate in a climate and area that is lush with life and nutrition. Such was not the case in Patagonia [i.e. Alone].
So the priorities set in the Alone scenario demanded certain carefully-to-be-determined parameters.
It's interesting because many after TSHTF scenarios might be very similar, in that circumstances will likely not be ideal, i.e. sunny and in a setting that offers many opportunities for hunting etc.
What will you do then?
These are worthwhile considerations to contemplate.


I'd like to add that in my 5-month La Gomera adventure in 2010, i came to regret not having sown seed on day one, for new vegetation takes time to grow. Now, if you're in a new environment and don't even have seed to plant, at the very least you can be busy setting up an area in which to allow local edible vegetation to flourish [i.e. good soil, which one might harvest from a forest, like the one in Patagonia].

As well, as illustrated in the James Clavell's book King Rat, even rats can be caught and bred to offer nutrition. Rats are relatively a lot of work as sources of animal protein, but beggars can't be chosers and if Zachery Fowler can survive for 3 months on 30 fish, imagine how one might do on one rat a day... Yeah, you'd obviously rather be eating fish, but from a survival point of view, you're better off scraping the meat off of a (properly cooked) rat than starving to death. (And the energy you derive from eating said rats may help you establish circumstances that are better / preferable / sustainable / humane / ideal.)
« Last Edit: November 17, 2017, 05:24:39 AM by Socrates »
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Yowbarb

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Re: Priorities in relation to time and other variables
« Reply #24 on: November 14, 2017, 01:26:20 PM »
Of course, preferably you dig in and hope your home prepping will suffice...
I myself have had (what i consider) a vision dream in which all my supplies were lost on a sinking ship; i consider this dream a warning not to count on being able to save what i'm able to source today. Whether the dream was 'spiritual' or not, i hold to it's warning of not putting all my eggs in the basket of counting on being able to hold onto preparations i can make today.

Socrates, as per usual you make a really good point...
Never a good idea to have all one's eggs in one basket...
It is always a good idea to have some caches, along the way to where you think you will go, some preparation better than nothing... a handrawn map...

Images from INCH Survival and Urban Survival Network.com

« Last Edit: November 14, 2017, 01:38:56 PM by Yowbarb »

ilinda

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Re: Priorities in relation to time and other variables
« Reply #25 on: November 14, 2017, 06:36:25 PM »
Of course, preferably you dig in and hope your home prepping will suffice...
I myself have had (what i consider) a vision dream in which all my supplies were lost on a sinking ship; i consider this dream a warning not to count on being able to save what i'm able to source today. Whether the dream was 'spiritual' or not, i hold to it's warning of not putting all my eggs in the basket of counting on being able to hold onto preparations i can make today.

Socrates, as per usual you make a really good point...
Never a good idea to have all one's eggs in one basket...
It is always a good idea to have some caches, along the way to where you think you will go, some preparation better than nothing... a handrawn map...

Images from INCH Survival and Urban Survival Network.com


I'm with yowbarb, in that everything of value in one location is truly unwise. 

One thing Socrates mentioned is "information".  I think this is key.  Any skills, knowledge, abilities, awareness one has that, perhaps, a hunter-gatherer may have had, is worth more than all the gold in the world, especially in these times.

Can anyone start a fire using only two sticks?  We watched Larry Kinsella do so in 30 seconds in his fire-starting demo at an old tine craft festival one year.  He is the same guy who makes his own stone axes, and other implements.  He mentioned his favorite materials are "cattail on yucca", meaning cattail for the spindle, and yucca for the bottom board.


Socrates

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Re: Priorities in relation to time and other variables
« Reply #26 on: November 15, 2017, 09:41:05 AM »
his favorite materials are "cattail on yucca", meaning cattail for the spindle, and yucca for the bottom board.
Oh, please elaborate...
Both yucca and cattail in relation to building friction for fire amaze me; they seem so soft...
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ilinda

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Re: Priorities in relation to time and other variables
« Reply #27 on: November 15, 2017, 06:42:17 PM »
his favorite materials are "cattail on yucca", meaning cattail for the spindle, and yucca for the bottom board.
Oh, please elaborate...
Both yucca and cattail in relation to building friction for fire amaze me; they seem so soft...
They do seem soft, until they dry.  And I'm assuming the yucca "board" would be the very largest leaves, and even better if using those "giant" yucca one sees in warmer climates.  Here yucca will get 4-5' tall and have nice plump leaves, and they would be definitely usable, as Larry Kinsella lives in Illinois, and likely uses yucca from this midwest area.

Cattail is fairly common where there is water, and I'm assuming by his use of cattail as the spindle, he means the main stem and not any of the leaves. 

We think the time we watched him start that fire so quickly, he was not using his two favorite materials, as they looked different.  One could experiment easily enough.  I've studied summer's end goldenrod stems and they look like "possibles" for the spindle.  They seem so dry and brittle, although too brittle would mean it would just break apart during use.  Still, with careful use, I'm thinking goldenrod stems might serve as spindles.

Also read somewhere that dried puffball mushroom is excellent fire tinder.  It sort of goes "poof!".  :-D))

Socrates

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HEALTH
« Reply #28 on: November 20, 2017, 10:37:47 PM »
Animals in nature enjoy:
- raw foods
- sunlight
- extremes
- probiotics [i.e. not interrupted or destroyed by antibiotics]
- exercise
- mineral-rich herbs and other nutrition
- freedom [i.e. relief from stress]
These are simply a way of life for creatures in nature.

As humans in popular culture, maybe we think we can emulate nature's gifts by taking some 'superfoods', uncooked foods, go to the gym for a few hours a week [if that...], etc. etc.
There is simply no comparison.
Animals in nature have loads of minerals, probiotics and such as part of their daily lives. There is no pill that allows one to replace such conditions. No wonder 80% of us will die prematurely due to cancer or heart disease [forget about all of the other ailments people suffer from!].

In martial arts the experts stress the basics and tend to completely ignore specific techniques (that novices tend to focus on). Health is similar; it's better to focus on the meta aspects of health than to get lost in symptoms and band-aids that are popular and easy to come by. In the end the question should be: "How natural is your condition?"
This question should then lead to answers that relieve the unnatural symptoms from which one might suffer.
« Last Edit: November 21, 2017, 05:25:09 AM by Socrates »
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