Author Topic: Medicinal, high-value, nutrient-dense, etc foods  (Read 4453 times)

Jimfarmer

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Medicinal, high-value, nutrient-dense, etc foods
« on: September 07, 2014, 06:44:18 AM »
"15 foods that naturally detox the body"  at
http://wakingtimes.com/gallery/2014/09/06/15-foods-naturally-detox-cleanse-body/

Not included:  Cilantro chelates metals and carries them out in the urine.

Yowbarb

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Re: Medicinal, high-value, nutrient-dense, etc foods
« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2014, 01:00:48 AM »
"15 foods that naturally detox the body"  at
http://wakingtimes.com/gallery/2014/09/06/15-foods-naturally-detox-cleanse-body/

Not included:  Cilantro chelates metals and carries them out in the urine.

Jimfarmer you got me thinking, so I looked up cilantro. I like the flavor, especially in juicing and in Mexican foods, salsa, etc. - Yowbarb...

Cilantro and Chlorella can Remove 80% of Heavy Metals from the Body within 42 Days

Read more: http://naturalsociety.com/proper-heavy-metal-chelation-cilantro-chlorella/#ixzz3HEgsBfd1
Follow us: @naturalsociety on Twitter | NaturalSociety on Facebook


http://naturalsociety.com/proper-heavy-metal-chelation-cilantro-chlorella/

steedy

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Re: Medicinal, high-value, nutrient-dense, etc foods
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2016, 11:28:38 AM »
When planning my herb garden this year, I have taken into account not only herbs good for flavoring, but what I could use to make my own herbal treatments.  I have more faith in natural, plant based medicines, rather than chemical medicines of today. 

Yowbarb

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Re: Medicinal, high-value, nutrient-dense, etc foods
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2016, 12:28:06 PM »
When planning my herb garden this year, I have taken into account not only herbs good for flavoring, but what I could use to make my own herbal treatments.  I have more faith in natural, plant based medicines, rather than chemical medicines of today.

Let us know how it goes. I suppose it has to be started indoor during winter months...
BTW do you have a greenhouse?
You Tube search terms: Build your own cheap greenhouse

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Build+your+own+cheap+greenhouse

ilinda

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Re: Medicinal, high-value, nutrient-dense, etc foods
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2016, 03:12:08 PM »
Now that is really cool, Yowbarb, posting all the variations of the home-built greenhouse.  Most people have plastic lying around, or as they say, it's fairly inexpensive. 

One way to get more mileage out of a piece of greenhouse plastic, is to, after the use for it is over for the season, fold it up carefully when dry, and store out of sunlight.  Sun will degrade plastic sheeting many times faster than about anything else.  So storage is best in summer.

Thanks again for posting such a variety.

steedy

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Re: Medicinal, high-value, nutrient-dense, etc foods
« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2016, 02:21:03 PM »
I don't have a greenhouse yet.  I'm not starting seedlings this year because I will be moving in a few weeks and I can't imagine a worse mess than trying to move hundreds of little baby plants.  Most, I'm sure would tip over during the trip and be a loss.

But my future new neighbor gave me a brilliant idea about how to convert a part of my new place into a greenhouse.  That will take a while, but it sure would be a good thing to have.

ilinda

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Re: Medicinal, high-value, nutrient-dense, etc foods
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2016, 04:13:26 PM »
I don't have a greenhouse yet.  I'm not starting seedlings this year because I will be moving in a few weeks and I can't imagine a worse mess than trying to move hundreds of little baby plants.  Most, I'm sure would tip over during the trip and be a loss.

But my future new neighbor gave me a brilliant idea about how to convert a part of my new place into a greenhouse.  That will take a while, but it sure would be a good thing to have.
Sounds like you going to have a very helpful neighbor.  You're off to a good start and I don't blame you for not wanting to bundle up a lot of tiny, vulnerable seedlings and drag them around in a bumpy vehicle.  They will thank you for waiting!

Yowbarb

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Re: Medicinal, high-value, nutrient-dense, etc foods
« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2016, 08:10:51 AM »
Now that is really cool, Yowbarb, posting all the variations of the home-built greenhouse.  Most people have plastic lying around, or as they say, it's fairly inexpensive. 

One way to get more mileage out of a piece of greenhouse plastic, is to, after the use for it is over for the season, fold it up carefully when dry, and store out of sunlight.  Sun will degrade plastic sheeting many times faster than about anything else.  So storage is best in summer.

Thanks again for posting such a variety.
:) That's a good tip with the plastic tarp.

Yowbarb

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Re: Medicinal, high-value, nutrient-dense, etc foods
« Reply #8 on: February 16, 2016, 08:11:47 AM »
I don't have a greenhouse yet.  I'm not starting seedlings this year because I will be moving in a few weeks and I can't imagine a worse mess than trying to move hundreds of little baby plants.  Most, I'm sure would tip over during the trip and be a loss.

But my future new neighbor gave me a brilliant idea about how to convert a part of my new place into a greenhouse.  That will take a while, but it sure would be a good thing to have.
Sounds great!

steedy

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Re: Medicinal, high-value, nutrient-dense, etc foods
« Reply #9 on: February 18, 2016, 08:42:58 AM »
I just recently learned that hemp hearts are a nutritionally dense food.  It's got a lot of the Omega fats in it that are the good kind.

Yowbarb

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Re: Medicinal, high-value, nutrient-dense, etc foods
« Reply #10 on: March 22, 2016, 03:47:54 PM »
I just recently learned that hemp hearts are a nutritionally dense food.  It's got a lot of the Omega fats in it that are the good kind.

Sounds good! Also lightweight, portable.
Been seeing it at whole foods and I need to get some...

Socrates

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Re: Medicinal, high-value, nutrient-dense, etc foods
« Reply #11 on: August 02, 2016, 09:37:34 AM »
"hemp hearts"? Are you talking "hemp curd"?
Did you know Egyptians 3000 years ago used this for making a 'concrete' that's stronger than modern concrete and 6 x lighter?
'Hempcrete' it's called; it's not about colloids, it's about chemistry. (There are 2 kinds of 'hempcrete'.)

Hemp used to be grown by everyone, for good reason. Look into it and make sure you have some seeds with you at all times; where to get them? Your local pet store will sell them by the pound as birdseed... [as cheap and ironic as that may be.]
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Socrates

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Re: Medicinal, high-value, nutrient-dense, etc foods
« Reply #12 on: October 20, 2016, 10:12:06 AM »
So, as i've recently started counting calories... Just went to the supermarkt and noticed some interesting differences.
- tuna; 200 calories/tin
- cheese, 2 pounds, 1.5 x as many calories for the equivalent price of 10 cans of tuna  [i.e.150% value/$]
- Spam; TWICE as many calories per gram as the cheese! (So 3 x as much caloric value as canned tuna in oil)

I was thinking to go buy a kilo of hemp/bird seed. (I'm preparing for an event these coming weeks.) i pay about 8 euros for a kilo of hemp seed. This is really good quality stuff for so little money.
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Socrates

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Re: counting calories
« Reply #13 on: November 24, 2016, 10:53:48 PM »
- tuna; 200 calories/tin
- cheese, 1.5 x as many calories as tuna  [i.e.150% value/$]
- Spam; TWICE as many calories per gram as the cheese! (So 3 x as much caloric value as canned tuna in oil)

So i can buy a 1.2kg can of dogfood for 1 buck and that's about twice the value as the Spam, but then i bought 9 pounds of honey for making 9 liters of mead and bothered to read the lable on the honey: 3000 CALORIES!
So that means the value is 4 x that of the Spam.
Now, mind you, this was the cheapest honey and the quality is probably so-so at best. I paid 1.35 euros; then i went to this guy who imports goods from the south of France and he sold me a pound of honey for 9.50... One might mix qualities of honey, of course, but in a pinch the 1.35 euros honey still contains 3000 calories.

So, what good is honey as a food?
I'm copy-pasting this post at my TEOTWAWKI message board from some years back to give you an idea:

from Stephen Buhner's book Sacred and Herbal Healing Beers, page 56:

The long-lived of antiquity who ate a diet primarily composed of bee products is impressive: Pythagoras, the Greek philosopher and mathematician, lived to the age of 90. His disciple, Apollonius, lived to 113. Anacreon, another Greek of antiquity, lived to 115. The Greek Democritus, perhaps one of the world's greatest physicists, lived to 109.
Pliny the Elder researched the ages of people living exclusively on honey and hive product diets late in the first century A.D. He found that in the region of the Apennine mountains, there were an anolomous number of people more than 100 years of age. Fifty-four were 100, fifty-seven were between 100 and 110, two were 125 years old, and seven were 135 years of age or older. In Parma, he located five who were more than 125, and nearby another eleven more than 100.
Piast, the king of Poland in A.D. 825, was a beekeeper who subsisted primarily on honey and other hive products. He lived to be 120 years of age. One Hebrew tribe, the Essenes, were noted beekeepers and renowned for their great age -- many passing 100 years.
Plutarch (A.D. 46-120) observed that the Britons, who subsisted on great amounts of honey, "only begin to grow old at one hundred and twenty years of age". The original Bardic name of the British Isles was "the Honey Isle of Beli" -- beekeeping was a major industry and honey one of its principle commodities. When Pliny the Elder visted the British Isles, he commented that "These islanders consume great quantities of honey brew." A pre-WW II investigation of tombstones in Britain noted that there were many long-lived Britishers who ate a great deal of honey from the comb. A few:
Sir Owen of Scotland died at 124 years of age,
his last son was born when he was 98 and he walked 74 miles in six days in the last year of his life;
Peter Garden, a Scot, died at the age of 131, keeping the appearance of a young man until the very end;
Willaim Ellis -- 130;
Mr. Eccleston, Irish -- 143;
Colonel Thomas Winsloe, Irish -- 146;
Francis Consist -- 150;
John Mount, Scot -- 136;
Thomas Parr -- 152.
And throughout the world beekeepers and mead drinkers have been reputed to enjoy extremely long life and good health. Sir Kenelm Digby remarked on this when he commented about one of his mead recipes:
The Meath is singularly good for a consumption, stone, gravel, weak-sight, and many more things. A chief Burgomaster of Antwerpe, used for many years to drink no other drink but this; at Meals and at all times, even for the pledging of healths. And though he were an old man, he was of an extraordinary vigor every way, and had every year a Child, had always a great appetite, and good digestions; and yet was not fat.

Perhaps the most interesting example of remarkable health from modern day is that of Noel Johnson, who at the age of 70 and in poor health began eating a diet consisting largely of honey and hive products. At the age of 90 (1993) he was title holder of the World's Senior Boxing Championship and a seasoned marathoner competing in events on every continent on Earth. He looks to be about 55 years of age.


[small]It should be understood that ancient meads were often made including other hive products like propolis and royal jelly, as entire sections of a hive [or an entire hive] might be thrown in the mix. Also, though even Stephen Buhner's recipes usually mention boiling the ingredients for an hour or more, often hive products are added to hot and cooling water and don't get boiled themselves. Raw recipes, too, should be considered for health purposes. Buhner's book is thick and bursting with all kinds of background and historical data and thoroughly worth having and reading. It is in my opinion a must-have and must-read!
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ilinda

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Re: counting calories
« Reply #14 on: November 27, 2016, 02:47:18 PM »
- tuna; 200 calories/tin
- cheese, 1.5 x as many calories as tuna  [i.e.150% value/$]
- Spam; TWICE as many calories per gram as the cheese! (So 3 x as much caloric value as canned tuna in oil)

So i can buy a 1.2kg can of dogfood for 1 buck and that's about twice the value as the Spam, but then i bought 9 pounds of honey for making 9 liters of mead and bothered to read the lable on the honey: 3000 CALORIES!
So that means the value is 4 x that of the Spam.
Now, mind you, this was the cheapest honey and the quality is probably so-so at best. I paid 1.35 euros; then i went to this guy who imports goods from the south of France and he sold me a pound of honey for 9.50... One might mix qualities of honey, of course, but in a pinch the 1.35 euros honey still contains 3000 calories.

So, what good is honey as a food?
I'm copy-pasting this post at my TEOTWAWKI message board from some years back to give you an idea:

from Stephen Buhner's book Sacred and Herbal Healing Beers, page 56:

The long-lived of antiquity who ate a diet primarily composed of bee products is impressive: Pythagoras, the Greek philosopher and mathematician, lived to the age of 90. His disciple, Apollonius, lived to 113. Anacreon, another Greek of antiquity, lived to 115. The Greek Democritus, perhaps one of the world's greatest physicists, lived to 109.
Pliny the Elder researched the ages of people living exclusively on honey and hive product diets late in the first century A.D. He found that in the region of the Apennine mountains, there were an anolomous number of people more than 100 years of age. Fifty-four were 100, fifty-seven were between 100 and 110, two were 125 years old, and seven were 135 years of age or older. In Parma, he located five who were more than 125, and nearby another eleven more than 100.
Piast, the king of Poland in A.D. 825, was a beekeeper who subsisted primarily on honey and other hive products. He lived to be 120 years of age. One Hebrew tribe, the Essenes, were noted beekeepers and renowned for their great age -- many passing 100 years.
Plutarch (A.D. 46-120) observed that the Britons, who subsisted on great amounts of honey, "only begin to grow old at one hundred and twenty years of age". The original Bardic name of the British Isles was "the Honey Isle of Beli" -- beekeeping was a major industry and honey one of its principle commodities. When Pliny the Elder visted the British Isles, he commented that "These islanders consume great quantities of honey brew." A pre-WW II investigation of tombstones in Britain noted that there were many long-lived Britishers who ate a great deal of honey from the comb. A few:
Sir Owen of Scotland died at 124 years of age,
his last son was born when he was 98 and he walked 74 miles in six days in the last year of his life;
Peter Garden, a Scot, died at the age of 131, keeping the appearance of a young man until the very end;
Willaim Ellis -- 130;
Mr. Eccleston, Irish -- 143;
Colonel Thomas Winsloe, Irish -- 146;
Francis Consist -- 150;
John Mount, Scot -- 136;
Thomas Parr -- 152.
And throughout the world beekeepers and mead drinkers have been reputed to enjoy extremely long life and good health. Sir Kenelm Digby remarked on this when he commented about one of his mead recipes:
The Meath is singularly good for a consumption, stone, gravel, weak-sight, and many more things. A chief Burgomaster of Antwerpe, used for many years to drink no other drink but this; at Meals and at all times, even for the pledging of healths. And though he were an old man, he was of an extraordinary vigor every way, and had every year a Child, had always a great appetite, and good digestions; and yet was not fat.

Perhaps the most interesting example of remarkable health from modern day is that of Noel Johnson, who at the age of 70 and in poor health began eating a diet consisting largely of honey and hive products. At the age of 90 (1993) he was title holder of the World's Senior Boxing Championship and a seasoned marathoner competing in events on every continent on Earth. He looks to be about 55 years of age.


[small]It should be understood that ancient meads were often made including other hive products like propolis and royal jelly, as entire sections of a hive [or an entire hive] might be thrown in the mix. Also, though even Stephen Buhner's recipes usually mention boiling the ingredients for an hour or more, often hive products are added to hot and cooling water and don't get boiled themselves. Raw recipes, too, should be considered for health purposes. Buhner's book is thick and bursting with all kinds of background and historical data and thoroughly worth having and reading. It is in my opinion a must-have and must-read!
One caveat is that much "honey" sold in the grocery stores is from China or who-knows-where and is either a mix of honey and other stuff, or not even true honey at all.  Know your source of honey very well.