Author Topic: Medicinal, high-value, nutrient-dense, etc foods  (Read 5173 times)

Socrates

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milk and honey
« Reply #15 on: January 11, 2017, 09:16:20 AM »
Know your source of honey very well.
As someone who ate vegetarian for 15 years (and 2 years as vegan) before it became the rage (in certain circles, anyway), as a prepper and survivalist i've had to come to accept that animal fats and proteins are the superior option in many cases.

And as a lover of honey and mead [i've been making my own for years], i have had to accept that survival focuses on calories and not much else. Hence, as far as survival is concerned i say i don't care about the quality of the honey much if it is cheap and gives me 3000 calories. I can worry about beekeeping and making superior quality honey after the survival phase has ended.

And as a vegetarian/vegan diet fan at heart, i like the idea of living off of honey (of whatever quality) rather than having to resort to a diet consisting largely of animal products.


I would like to add that i have of late been trying out eating honey when i'm hungry; i find that after having consumed some, that i have a craving for... milk.
I guess there is some logic to this. There are physiological and biological balances to consider, particularly between the consumption of proteins and carbs.
Anyhow, biblical accounts of John the Baptist living off of locusts and honey in mind, as well as Israel's name of "Land of milk and honey", perhaps my experience and reasoning is not so far-fetched.
In a land that is bereft of good soil and rain, if one were to be able to live off of what one's bees and goats produce, this would make life possible in otherwise (for humans) barren regions. And that also means that the hoards of survivors would be elsewhere...
Goats will eat just about anything and bees... well, there are always flowering plants. In fact, often a dying plant will put it's last energy into flowering, for the benefit of the species.


Again, this option depends on saving the genetic information locked up in livestock (or in this case: bees); if the planet is laid to waste, where ya gonna get yer goats, sheep, cattle, pigs, etc. from? You might have to travel half the world before you run into the species you're looking for!
Save a goat, save the world... [Heroes reference  ;)]

Now, it might be a grave mistake to assume [sic] that you'll be able to find wild bee hives at some point. In fact, until the Europeans introduced them to North America, there were no honey bees there. Oh, there were mason bees and all other manner of creatures that help flowering plants along, but American natives did not know and enjoy honey bees. Let alone did they enjoy species of honey bees that are docile.

If you have a pot of honey and a queen bee, you can keep a population of honey bees alive. You can order honey bees online; they will send you a queen bee and some workers. It's worth considering. God knows it beats carrying around 1000 pounds of grain...
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« Last Edit: January 11, 2017, 09:59:05 AM by Socrates »
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ilinda

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Re: Medicinal, high-value, nutrient-dense, etc foods
« Reply #16 on: January 11, 2017, 12:15:06 PM »
The main reason I mention knowing the source of "honey" is that some honey sold in honey jars and labeled as honey is not honey at all.  Some of these fake honeys are perhaps partly honey, and some are a concoction made to taste, look and feel like honey.  I don't want to point fingers at a particular country, but a lot of the information I see regarding the fake honey, mostly point to one very large country, a country that has become a master as producing "knock-offs" of many types, from shoes, to handbags, to antiques, to even honey.


Yowbarb

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Re: Medicinal, high-value, nutrient-dense, etc foods
« Reply #17 on: January 11, 2017, 05:15:37 PM »
The main reason I mention knowing the source of "honey" is that some honey sold in honey jars and labeled as honey is not honey at all.  Some of these fake honeys are perhaps partly honey, and some are a concoction made to taste, look and feel like honey.  I don't want to point fingers at a particular country, but a lot of the information I see regarding the fake honey, mostly point to one very large country, a country that has become a master as producing "knock-offs" of many types, from shoes, to handbags, to antiques, to even honey.

ilinda thanks for your post on this! :)
I had posted about fake honey awhile back.
We cannot get the word out too many times so thank you. I think we know what country that is... I think some of the the fake honey made in US too... I will review what I had posted.
It doesn't do the body much good unless it is real!
Blessings,
Barb T.

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Re: Medicinal, high-value, nutrient-dense, etc foods
« Reply #18 on: January 11, 2017, 05:16:42 PM »
Socrates, I just want to quickly give you an acknowledgement on your post... milk and honey.
really valuable discussion!
Back inna while...

ilinda

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Re: Medicinal, high-value, nutrient-dense, etc foods
« Reply #19 on: January 12, 2017, 06:59:21 AM »
Socrates, I just want to quickly give you an acknowledgement on your post... milk and honey.
really valuable discussion!
Back inna while...

And I should add my thanks to Socrates too.  His recent post reminds me of a particular book I've never seen but which a friend described once.

The book, whose title I do not know but perhaps some reader may, tells us that in a dire survival situation, one can survive quite a long time on just five items for ingestion:  nonfat dry milk, honey, wheat berries, fat, and salt.  Of course you would want pesticide-free foods if possible for the highest quality, but in pondering the list, one can see that wheat berries can be sprouted, sprouted and fermented, ground into flour, or cracked and cooked as a breadfast cereal just like "Cream of Wheat".  One can even make sourdough starter from wheat flour if they have some starch such as potato water.   Who knows how many ways there are to process wheat for a different flavor and texture.

And of course the honey can be fermented into wine.  The milk can be reconstituted, and/or fermented into yogurt.

If anyone recognizes the book, we would appreciate knowing the title and author.

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Re: Medicinal, high-value, nutrient-dense, etc foods
« Reply #20 on: January 12, 2017, 01:07:55 PM »
ilinda that sounds like such a wonderful book...I will help in locating it...

Socrates

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wheat berries
« Reply #21 on: January 13, 2017, 01:11:49 AM »
nonfat dry milk, honey, wheat berries, fat, and salt.

And of course the honey can be fermented into wine.
Some feedback..
- fat; ghee? What fats keep best? Anyone know?
- salt; seasalt is a completely different animal than tablesalt. Entire economies used to be based on access to and trade of (quality) salt. Thankfully, today we can buy seasalt in bulk at fair prices. I suggest everyone stock up. Tablesalt is toxic, while seasalt is not only nutritional but can also be used for fertilizing dirt [helping to create soil].
- as someone who's been brewing for years, i feel i must remark on the word "wine" here; our impoverished, average-based, ignorant modern culture tends to break everything down to 'beer and wine', but it really shows one's ignorance; i'm sorry, i do not mean to offend, but it should be said. One can brew honey and create mead or one can brew it with more water and create a product that is less (alcoholically) potent that is dry mead. Laymen may describe such products as "wine" & "beer" but in fact "wine" = fermented grapes and "beer" is sprouted, dried and crushed barley [mout] that has been fermented. There are many other options, though Western culture generally ignores their existence.

I have discussed the matter at my message board:
Dry Mead, honey beer [Mead = honey wine]
Pulque, agave beer
Tiswin, Saguaro beer
Chicha, corn beer
Tesquino, germinated corn beer
cornstalk beer
Surinam corn beer
Masato, manioc beer
Chang, beer of millet, barley, wheat, or rice
ad infinitum

When i was with the Mormons (around the year 2000), i bought 10 barrels of wheat kernels that had been carefully packaged to keep for at least 20 years (though wheat [spelt] found in the pyramids still sprouted millennia after it had been put there).
If you don't know where to source such a thing, i suggest you go to your local Mormon church and ask around. Each Mormon is encouraged to keep at least a year's worth of food, water and fuel at hand [at least, since i was in contact with these folk], so there's some logistics always in place to support this for Mormon church members.

On a side note: if you can stock up on a good quality corn (kernels), this is potentially even a far better option than grains.
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ilinda

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Re: wheat berries
« Reply #22 on: January 14, 2017, 01:38:57 PM »
nonfat dry milk, honey, wheat berries, fat, and salt.

And of course the honey can be fermented into wine.
Some feedback..
- fat; ghee? What fats keep best? Anyone know?
- salt; seasalt is a completely different animal than tablesalt. Entire economies used to be based on access to and trade of (quality) salt. Thankfully, today we can buy seasalt in bulk at fair prices. I suggest everyone stock up. Tablesalt is toxic, while seasalt is not only nutritional but can also be used for fertilizing dirt [helping to create soil].
- as someone who's been brewing for years, i feel i must remark on the word "wine" here; our impoverished, average-based, ignorant modern culture tends to break everything down to 'beer and wine', but it really shows one's ignorance; i'm sorry, i do not mean to offend, but it should be said. One can brew honey and create mead or one can brew it with more water and create a product that is less (alcoholically) potent that is dry mead. Laymen may describe such products as "wine" & "beer" but in fact "wine" = fermented grapes and "beer" is sprouted, dried and crushed barley [mout] that has been fermented. There are many other options, though Western culture generally ignores their existence.

I have discussed the matter at my message board:
Dry Mead, honey beer [Mead = honey wine]
Pulque, agave beer
Tiswin, Saguaro beer
Chicha, corn beer
Tesquino, germinated corn beer
cornstalk beer
Surinam corn beer
Masato, manioc beer
Chang, beer of millet, barley, wheat, or rice
ad infinitum

When i was with the Mormons (around the year 2000), i bought 10 barrels of wheat kernels that had been carefully packaged to keep for at least 20 years (though wheat [spelt] found in the pyramids still sprouted millennia after it had been put there).
If you don't know where to source such a thing, i suggest you go to your local Mormon church and ask around. Each Mormon is encouraged to keep at least a year's worth of food, water and fuel at hand [at least, since i was in contact with these folk], so there's some logistics always in place to support this for Mormon church members.

On a side note: if you can stock up on a good quality corn (kernels), this is potentially even a far better option than grains.
In discussing food storage with a friend a few weeks ago, he mentioned some recipes for pemmiken call for lard (although the Native Americans I believe used bear fat).  He also talked about mixing lard with meat and fruit (Natives used deer meat with persimmons, dried.)  One point he made was about the lard and how it can keep the pemmiken (sp) good for 10 or more years.

Many alcoholic beverages can be brewed, starting with fruit, grains, etc.  In Stephen Buhner's book, Sacred, Ancient Healing Beers, he discusses mead as do other writers, and it is my understanding that "authentic mead" is made by plunging living honeycomb, with the bees, into the boiling vat, and in the process, the anger of the dying bees is transferred to the beverage, via adrenaline or adrenaline-like chemicals, which in turn, is then assimilated by the drinker, supposedly endowing the imbiber with various qualities relating to super-strength, etc. 

  I think honey can be brewed into alcoholic beverage(s) without that part of the process.  I personally cannot imagine sacrificing bees I consider to be my friends and protectors.

Regarding stored foods, my own personal experience with freeze-dried wheat berries is worth mentioning.  We bought a few large cans of such wheat knowing it had/has a shelf life of several decades.  Supposedly.  About five years after buying the wheat we tried to use it several times, and although it tasted and looked good, I always got a headache shortly afterward. 

It is only now decades later that I've read that stored food can sometimes end up with methanol being produced slowly over time, from a breakdown or recombination of something, which in normal times is innocuous, or even healthful.  So be aware of long-term storage foods.  My husband did not suffer the same headaches, but mine were ALWAYS after the stored wheat, so now I think it may have been due to the somehow-produced methanol.

I have also experienced the same phenomenon with yogurt.  When I get raw milk, I immediately make it all into yogurt which has a shelf life that is considerably longer than milk.  I did a study a couple of years ago to see just how long the yogurt would remain tasty and not contaminated with mould (easy to spot in white yogurt).

I labeled each jar as to the date (all from same batch)  and purposely set them aside, making sure that one jar was exactly one month old before ingesting.  It was great.  The next jar, labeled the same date, I purposely did not touch until two months exactly, and with same results:  tasted good and looked perfect.  Then the jar for the third month was "iffy".  That jar was edible but seemed to have a slightly different taste.  The final jar, at four months of age, looked perfect, and tasted good, but I got a headache each time I tried to eat it, so that one I discarded.  I assume, but cannot prove methanol was produced, but have a good idea that was happening, as "long-term storage" is relative to the type of food, and very different for wheat vs. yogurt.

I intend to grow corn again this year, one popcorn variety and another for grinding into flour.  Now is a good time to get started finding seeds.


Yowbarb

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Re: Medicinal, high-value, nutrient-dense, etc foods
« Reply #23 on: January 14, 2017, 07:02:09 PM »
Yowbarb Note: This is advertised as organic, non-GMO, includes foods, and a section for seeds including spelt:
...

Pleasant Hill Grain, Nebraska
https://pleasanthillgrain.com/

http://pleasanthillgrain.com/food/grains-legumes-seeds/garden-sprouting?___store=default

http://pleasanthillgrain.com/buy-organic-spelt-for-sale-bulk-bucket

Garden and Sprouting seeds

info@pleasanthillgrain.com
Toll Free: 1-866-467-6123
International: 1-402-725-3829

http://pleasanthillgrain.com/ancient-grain-heirloom-collection

ANCIENT SEEDS COLLECTION: VARIETIES INCLUDED
BARLEY, Waxy Hulless
SPELT, Maverick
QUINOA, Short Blanca
AMARANTH, Kanta
RYE, Prima
OATS, Monida
KAMUT Brand korasan wheat
MILLET, White Proso
CORN, Hopi Blue
FLAX, Brown

Socrates

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Re: wheat berries/honey/storage
« Reply #24 on: January 15, 2017, 08:19:16 AM »
In Stephen Buhner's book, Sacred, Ancient Healing Beers, he discusses mead as do other writers, and it is my understanding that "authentic mead" is made by plunging living honeycomb, with the bees, into the boiling vat, and in the process, the anger of the dying bees is transferred to the beverage, via adrenaline or adrenaline-like chemicals, which in turn, is then assimilated by the drinker, supposedly endowing the imbiber with various qualities relating to super-strength, etc. 

  I think honey can be brewed into alcoholic beverage(s) without that part of the process.  I personally cannot imagine sacrificing bees I consider to be my friends and protectors.
God no! As a vegan at heart i could not imagine killing off loads of bees for the sake of brewing mead. Having said that, it is commonly accepted by beekeepers that some bees don't make alive it through the process of harvesting honey. Well, they are insects, after all...
If you take out a comb from the hive, the bees will leave it after a while; then, you will be left with larvae and queen bee pods full of royal jelly as well as the rest.

Now, i have never boiled my brews; and though modern sources consistently claim that boiling is an inherent part of the brewing process, i have never had a batch go bad. So throwing anything into boiling water is certainly not part of anything i would feel comfortable being part of.
As much as i am a great fan of Stephen Buhner's book, i've no interest in the boiling aspects of the recipes mentioned in said book and i have done fine without it.

Regarding stored foods, my own personal experience with freeze-dried wheat berries is worth mentioning.  We bought a few large cans of such wheat knowing it had/has a shelf life of several decades.  Supposedly.  About five years after buying the wheat we tried to use it several times, and although it tasted and looked good, I always got a headache shortly afterward.
It should be noted that even so-called ecological wheat is stored in silos where the wheat is sprayed with mercury; yes, whatever kind of wheat you purchase in the U.S.A., it contains mercury. I wonder if your headaches come from this. You should note that there have been children diagnosed with 'gluton intollerance' who did fine on bread made from wheat that had never been in a silo...
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ilinda

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Re: wheat berries/honey/storage
« Reply #25 on: January 15, 2017, 03:09:50 PM »
In Stephen Buhner's book, Sacred, Ancient Healing Beers, he discusses mead as do other writers, and it is my understanding that "authentic mead" is made by plunging living honeycomb, with the bees, into the boiling vat, and in the process, the anger of the dying bees is transferred to the beverage, via adrenaline or adrenaline-like chemicals, which in turn, is then assimilated by the drinker, supposedly endowing the imbiber with various qualities relating to super-strength, etc. 

  I think honey can be brewed into alcoholic beverage(s) without that part of the process.  I personally cannot imagine sacrificing bees I consider to be my friends and protectors.
God no! As a vegan at heart i could not imagine killing off loads of bees for the sake of brewing mead. Having said that, it is commonly accepted by beekeepers that some bees don't make alive it through the process of harvesting honey. Well, they are insects, after all...
If you take out a comb from the hive, the bees will leave it after a while; then, you will be left with larvae and queen bee pods full of royal jelly as well as the rest.

Now, i have never boiled my brews; and though modern sources consistently claim that boiling is an inherent part of the brewing process, i have never had a batch go bad. So throwing anything into boiling water is certainly not part of anything i would feel comfortable being part of.
As much as i am a great fan of Stephen Buhner's book, i've no interest in the boiling aspects of the recipes mentioned in said book and i have done fine without it.

Regarding stored foods, my own personal experience with freeze-dried wheat berries is worth mentioning.  We bought a few large cans of such wheat knowing it had/has a shelf life of several decades.  Supposedly.  About five years after buying the wheat we tried to use it several times, and although it tasted and looked good, I always got a headache shortly afterward.
It should be noted that even so-called ecological wheat is stored in silos where the wheat is sprayed with mercury; yes, whatever kind of wheat you purchase in the U.S.A., it contains mercury. I wonder if your headaches come from this. You should note that there have been children diagnosed with 'gluton intollerance' who did fine on bread made from wheat that had never been in a silo...
I don't "know" for certain what caused the headaches from eating wheat that was the extended-shelf-life type, but I have never experienced such a thing with wheat before, or after that time, and never used those cans again.

I don't believe all wheat contains mercury, although it is true that there is mercury fallout from coal-burning power plants, that is so bad that there is a "mercury advisory for fish" that extends to every fishable body of water in about every state in the U.S.  I'm not sure how much mercury the wheat would absorb, but it it were as bad as fish, there would have to be a "wheat advisory" also.  (That could happen in the future of course).

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mercury on wheat
« Reply #26 on: January 15, 2017, 07:22:25 PM »
what i heard is that mercury is sprayed on wheat in silos [all wheat, no matter how or where it was grown] as a matter of national policy. (The mercury is so deadly that it keeps mold and such from growing.)
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ilinda

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Re: mercury on wheat
« Reply #27 on: January 20, 2017, 03:23:38 PM »
what i heard is that mercury is sprayed on wheat in silos [all wheat, no matter how or where it was grown] as a matter of national policy. (The mercury is so deadly that it keeps mold and such from growing.)
Because it was so hard for me to believe organic grains are sprayed with mercury, I wrote to that Pleasant Hill Grain Company which yowbarb posted about on January 14, to ask them.  I was relieved to receive his reply and now I plan to order from them, as we have been looking for somewhere other than Amazon to order organic bulk foods.

Their reply: 




   •   Tom Boley <tom.boley@4phg.com>
   •   
   •   Today at 9:56 AM

CC
Linda,
Good morning.
I have never heard of any grain, let alone all grains are treated with mercury before they go into silo storage. Certainly for organic grains, this would be a prohibited practice. I do know that all of the grains that we sell do not have a germination cert. It is my understanding that for better sprouting results and or a "guarantee" for sprouting success, any seed really requires a germination certification.
The grains we sell are not "dead" seeds by any means, just that they are mainly grains that are harvested for consumption.
I hope this helps answer your concern.
Regards,
Tom Boley | Commercial and Volume Sales Supervisor 
Pleasant Hill Grain 
P 402.725.3835 Ext. 220
F 402.725.3836 
Email tom.boley@4phg.com 
Web www.pleasanthillgrain.com

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Re: mercury on wheat
« Reply #28 on: February 18, 2017, 10:49:41 AM »
I have never heard of any grain, let alone all grains are treated with mercury before they go into silo storage. Certainly for organic grains, this would be a prohibited practice.
Well, i certainly would hope he is right, but i have it on good authority. Does this man actually know what goes on at silos? I mean, for instance, nowadays Californian almonds are irradiated 'by law', but would anybody in the 'almond sourcing circle' even know that somewhere along the line the almonds are being irradiated? I mean, unless they're actually part of that very process?
I'm just sayin'.


Enough on that topic as far as i'm concerned, for we just won't ever know.
What i wanted to add is that i was recently reminded of this Chinese gentleman who lived to be 256 years old on some special diet. I'd forgotten what his diet was so i looked it up. And what do ya know? He'd been living off of herbs, fungus, dried fruit, roots and... wine.
Just sayin'.

[Herb: Indian Pennywort; fungus: Reishi; fruit: goji berries; root: ginseng]
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ilinda

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Re: mercury on wheat
« Reply #29 on: February 18, 2017, 03:05:07 PM »
I have never heard of any grain, let alone all grains are treated with mercury before they go into silo storage. Certainly for organic grains, this would be a prohibited practice.
Well, i certainly would hope he is right, but i have it on good authority. Does this man actually know what goes on at silos? I mean, for instance, nowadays Californian almonds are irradiated 'by law', but would anybody in the 'almond sourcing circle' even know that somewhere along the line the almonds are being irradiated? I mean, unless they're actually part of that very process?
I'm just sayin'.

Enough on that topic as far as i'm concerned, for we just won't ever know.
This man, Tom Boley, is with Pleasant Hill Grain Company, and they deal primarily with organic grains.  Many small grain growers do not need silos as they do not have tons and tons to store. 

Plus, often organic grains sell out so quickly they can be bagged and shipped quickly.  Our friend who died about three years ago grew organic wheat, primarily for his own family, but occasionally he made some available to others.  He used a grain flail, pillowcase, and other primitive tools for freeing the grain seed from the stem and hull, the most onerous task if you're a small grower, but stored his grain in his "harvest room" under the stairs.

So small growers would be very different from those who grow thousands of acres or even hundreds of acres of grain.  Those large growers presumably would be the ones needing silos.

Another place I might check, now that you've piqued my curiosity, is Bob's Red Mill.  They personally visit each grower, inspect their crops, fields, etc., and want to know exactly how the grains are grown, stored, etc.  Because they have a personal relationship with growers, they would have to know, so I'll report back what I find from them, as now I want to make sure we don't get mercury-tainted spelt which is what we use for our breads these days.