Author Topic: Complicated / detailed PERMACULTURE  (Read 3999 times)

Socrates

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to chop and drop
« Reply #30 on: June 12, 2017, 04:48:15 AM »
Whenever rainfall exceeds evaporation, conditions are ideal for chop and drop mulching. During the portion of the year where you see the most rainfall, that’s when you should start creating mulch. Not only will the added moisture help with the decomposition process, it will also keep the mulch in place.
To chop and drop is about letting non-fruit-bearing flora like comfrey or kuzu [good examples of chop-and-drop plants] grow, only for you to cut them down and let them rot/decompose. Such plants not only fix nitrogen in the soil as they grow but also add minerals to soil, and create soil, as they decompose.

It is a very basic principle, however, it is a principle that's completely alien to conventional systems that hoe, weed and burn away organic matter rather than utilize them.

Chop and drop, however, is a tactic that's really more appropriate for moderate climates, for if it's too hot or dry, no rot/decomposition will take place. The hotter and dryer it is, the more one may be interested in using things like kuzu or comfrey cuttings in shaded places or in compost heaps.
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R.R. Book

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Re: Complicated / detailed PERMACULTURE
« Reply #31 on: June 12, 2017, 04:56:21 AM »
That might be a good way to reclaim the soil in our henyard Socrates, a very difficult task indeed.  If nothing else, it would attract bugs and other small critters for the hens to prey upon.   Thanks for suggesting it!

Socrates

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starting without soil
« Reply #32 on: August 06, 2017, 10:47:47 PM »
So let's say you have a piece of dirt and it looks like this...

What do you do?

Conventional thinking would have you bulldozing it, using one of these

and mixing your newly-turned dirt with some manure and/or fertilizer.
[One can go in all directions / variables with this principle, like using seawater instead of fertilizer or a pickaxe instead of machinery, but in the end the result is the same.]

As a lone and poorly-funded individual, i might have watered such land until it becomes able to get yer trowel or shovel in there. Unfortunately, this takes exorbitant amounts of water. As well, it essentially drowns whatever microorganisms you (still) have living in said soil. Or i might've waited [and waited and waited] until [finally] rain comes and i can get in there with  my trowel or shovel or pickaxe.
Either way, a terrible waste of water...

A smart thing to do would be to cover whatever plot you have in mind to garden with dead organic material; this can be hay / dead grass, wood chips [ideally] or other materials [thinking pieces of rotted log, 'straw', etc.] Then, when it rains (or when you throw some water [or pee] on it), said moisture will immediately become part of a microcosm of organics rather than evaporate, drown subterranean lifeforms or be otherwise wasteful.
Soil is about planning; it's about knowledge and patience and about doing away with the bad without destroying the good; that's why they call it "soil management".
[It could be your plot is at altitude and you have to carry all of your water uphill; but even 1 liter per day can make a big difference if it's absorbed by a microcosm of subterranean flora and fauna that base their existence on not allowing water to escape...]

After a while, a few weeks or a year [depending on the circumstances, your efforts and your needs] that hard-packed soil you started out with will have become accessible to digging and planting. Once the soil is moist and one-celled organisms start multiplying [exponentially], said life will be able to take advantage of things like moisture, added minerals [wood chips, seawater solution, etc.] and whatever seeds you add to the mix.

On the other hand, if you're an ignorant basterd who's been conditioned to assume that 'modern agriculture' is a feasible model / paradigm, all you'll be doing is whining and wailing how you have no good soil to work with, not enough water, your animals have nothing to sustain them and how you're suffering from 'bad luck'...3179
« Last Edit: August 07, 2017, 03:07:26 AM by Socrates »
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location, civilisation reboot, PERMACULTURE, postcataclysmic soil, Growing Soil 1.01