Author Topic: Urban Farming  (Read 694 times)

MadMax

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Urban Farming
« on: December 27, 2016, 03:54:51 PM »
It seems that the “Powers at Be” are telling people that food will be in short supply soon and that they had better get prepared!!

The US government is loaning millions of dollars to jumpstart urban farming

http://www.businessinsider.com/usda-urban-agriculture-2016-12

Every year, the US Department of Agriculture devotes millions of dollars to farmers in rural areas.

The government is increasingly starting to offer assistance to urban farms, too.

In 2016, the USDA funded a dozen urban farms, the highest number in history, Val Dolicini, the administrator for the USDA Farm Services Agency, tells Business Insider.’’

In 2017, he expects the USDA to funnel even more money toward farms on rooftops, in greenhouses, and in warehouses.


USDA Microloans, a program that offers funding up to $50,000, is specifically geared toward urban farmers.  Established in 2013, the program has awarded 23,000 loans worth $518 million to farms in California, Connecticut, and Massachusetts. Though it is open to all farmers, urban farmers often apply for it because it offers the money on a smaller scale than other programs. Seventy percent (or about 16,100 of those loans) have gone to new farmers, many of them in cities.

"Urban farmers are not looking to form 10,000 acres in Missouri, but perhaps in an indoor container on a parking lot next to old factory," Dolcini says.

The USDA currently has 2,200 offices, the majority of which are located in rural states, like Missouri, Iowa, and Texas. In winter 2016 , Dolcini says the USDA hired NYC's first urban agriculture specialist, who will coordinate farm efforts in Brooklyn.

These initiatives underscore a growing movement within the USDA to support local food systems and look beyond rural agriculture.

"The global population is expected to be 9 billion by 2050. We really need to pull every farm into finding solutions for that — not just folks out in the Midwest who grow the lion's share of food but also those in urban agriculture," he says.

Though the modern local agriculture movement sprouted up in the late '90s, it has grown rapidly in cities in recent years. Today, urban farmers are not just growing a few tomatoes on rooftops, they're moving toward commercial production.

In 2016, the world's largest vertical farm, Aerofarms, launched inside a 70,000-square-foot warehouse in Newark, New Jersey. Brooklyn-based urban farming company Gotham Greens opened the world's largest rooftop farm in Chicago in late 2015.

Max
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Socrates

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Re: Urban Farming
« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2016, 12:27:46 AM »
After the Wall Street crash of '29 many millions of Americans made it through the following depression because they had family who had a farm.

Since the 1920's/'30s a lot has changed. Last # i heard, about 3% of folks nowadays farm. And that trend is spreading worldwide as more and more countries are falling for the pie-in-the-sky promises of pharmaceutical companies 'educating' both governments and civilians alike of how one supposedly can increase yield by chemical fertilizers and custom-fit hybrid seeds. But then what they DON'T tell you is how such investments lead to ever increasing overhead costs while actually not increasing profit by much, at all, or actually end up costing either more work or more money.
These small farmers go broke, as well through ever-increasing regulations they can't keep up with and subsidized market prices that kill honest competition. All over the world big companies have been and continue to buy up small farms. Thus people head to the city, leaving food production in the hands of the very people and companies that caused the destruction of small-farm communities.


People need to let go of the idea that producing food is something 'farmers' do. Throughout the ages MOST people have produced food one way or another. And there are indeed examples of folks even in urban areas, often on half an acre or less, making a real difference for themselves, for quality of produce, for independence and for a society that has this messed-up idea that producing food is something one leaves to strangers...
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ilinda

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Re: Urban Farming
« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2016, 04:31:18 PM »
After the Wall Street crash of '29 many millions of Americans made it through the following depression because they had family who had a farm.

Since the 1920's/'30s a lot has changed. Last # i heard, about 3% of folks nowadays farm. And that trend is spreading worldwide as more and more countries are falling for the pie-in-the-sky promises of pharmaceutical companies 'educating' both governments and civilians alike of how one supposedly can increase yield by chemical fertilizers and custom-fit hybrid seeds. But then what they DON'T tell you is how such investments lead to ever increasing overhead costs while actually not increasing profit by much, at all, or actually end up costing either more work or more money.
These small farmers go broke, as well through ever-increasing regulations they can't keep up with and subsidized market prices that kill honest competition. All over the world big companies have been and continue to buy up small farms. Thus people head to the city, leaving food production in the hands of the very people and companies that caused the destruction of small-farm communities.


People need to let go of the idea that producing food is something 'farmers' do. Throughout the ages MOST people have produced food one way or another. And there are indeed examples of folks even in urban areas, often on half an acre or less, making a real difference for themselves, for quality of produce, for independence and for a society that has this messed-up idea that producing food is something one leaves to strangers...
And don't forget rooftop gardening.  How nice not to have to fight the rabbits and deer for your produce.  Of course there are crows....

Socrates

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Re: Urban Farming
« Reply #3 on: December 29, 2016, 12:44:55 AM »
And don't forget rooftop gardening.  How nice not to have to fight the rabbits and deer for your produce.  Of course there are crows....
if we're going there... There's guerilla gardening! And indeed, the great thing about towns and cities is that you're not competing with much wildlife, if any at all.

More or less worthless trees, shrubs and plants can be replaced by fruit-bearing ones and of course completely abandoned square feet covered with soil and mulch with some interesting seeds thrown in...
If one takes all the wasted space and turns it into fruit-bearing green, that's a lot of fruit and ya don't have to buy a single square foot to get started. What's more, if one plants 'strange-looking' fruit like black tomatoes, you can be pretty sure no one else is even going to harvest it, no matter how many people walk by.
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