Author Topic: setting up from scratch  (Read 804 times)

Socrates

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setting up from scratch
« on: February 06, 2017, 12:26:00 PM »
I submit a new concept: Guerilla Homesteading

Looters of all kind are inherently lazy. That's why governments love their 'slaves in cities' and small farmers have almost been made extinct [with food grown by about 3% of the population nowadays]. Governments centralize themselves and they centralize people so they are easily taxed, controlled, registered, etc. etc. And we fools play right into their hands...

I have heard so many people talking about growing their own food and it begins with: "I'm going to buy me some land first". So after TEOTWAWKI, are your legal claims to said land going to be defended by some governmental forces? Of course not. But you figure we're not there yet so you wanna be able to set up shop and be left alone for now. But 'now' isn't your focus of attention, is it? And what you set up today, don't you want that to be available to you later, as well?

One avoids future loss of all kinds, including government coming in an confiscating your success, by spreading out your endeavours and success. Also, this way you do not require the purchase of any land and that saves you a lot of money, or offers you a way out if you don't have money to begin with.
Looters are lazy; they're not going to be hiking and climbing for hours to pillage some tree you have, especially if they have to go looking for it to begin with.
But you can plant trees anywhere you like, no? And you will know exactly where said trees are, when they fruit, how to get there, etc. Putting all your trees, plants and animals in one place is just putting all your eggs in one basket; why would you even go there?

Permaculture gives us all the tools we need to reclaim lands that conventional farmers and landowners have abandoned as write-offs. But we're talking vast expanses of land here; if 30% of the world's arable lands have already been written off, we're talking millions of hectares for the taking. And all you have to do is find a few promising square meters here and there, plant a tree, put down some soil and plant vegetables, etc. and then remember where you put them.

Orangutans so something similar; they have such good memories that the whole year they move from one fruiting tree to the next throughout the jungle. They're always on the move and their food is spread out everywhere. And yet they're always at the right place at the right time. And you have a great advantage over the orangutan, for you can even plant trees and cultivate specific spots, even if there's no jungle (to begin with).

Trees give so much fruit that even if strangers come by one day and find yours fruiting, they could eat until they're full and there will still be plenty left for everyone. But, anyway, just plant loads of trees so even if some of them are harvested by strangers, you're still left with enough to feed yourself. But most people couldn't recognize a tree to begin with and will ignore your trees unless they are actually bearing fruit. But you'll be planting them where hardly anybody comes by so, again, chances of losing your tree remain slim.
Modern man has this silly idea of a farm surrounded by a few acres of fruit-bearing plants and domesticated animals; there is no reason to limit oneself to such notions. Claim a wide territory as 'yours'; if someone asks you what you're doing while you're on your way to one of your trees, you tell them you're just out on a hike. No need to tell anyone that you're the one who cultivated anything. But you know just where to find them and when...
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Socrates

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some practical pointers on planting trees
« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2017, 02:02:29 AM »
Some cheap or free options.

The best option is to plant seeds rather than seedlings. As permaculture wizard Paul Wheaton puts it, transplanting seedlings often doesn't end well and destroys or disturbs the tree's taproot.

The Waterboxx initiator, however, suggests just cutting off the entire lowest part of a seedling's roots so there is no horizontal growth of the taproot left and it will start regrowing vertically downward.

I prefer the idea of planting seeds (just to be sure) but there are obvious advantages of working with seedlings. One way to make seeds work better is by planting a whole lot of them in close proximity to each other and culling the seedlings as they grow; in the end you keep those trees that have prospered best and offer the best fruit.
This is not only a basic permaculture tactic in establishing soil/a food forest, but it is also a tactic that anchors soil through the roots of quickly and deeply rooting trees [i.e. the roots of most plants tend to anchor differently and not offer the same effect].
Also, in this manner one can plant just about any seed from any fruit one has on hand, for Paul Wheaton explains that 20% of a fruit's seeds tend to give a tree with good fruit and the remaining 80% can simply be culled (as sacrificial trees helping to establish soil).


What Pieter Hoff of the Groasis Waterboxx also points out [the Waterboxx, after all, having been developed for helping trees to grow in harsh environments] is that the taproot of a tree will burrow down literally through solid rock in search of water and minerals/nutrients. This also means that trees might be planted at locales where animals that might eat said trees/seedlings are unlikely to come by [thinking the goats of local herdsmen]. (Obviously this only works with a seed/seedling with an intact taproot.)
Another option, obviously, is investing in said Waterboxxes which can be set up anywhere and which will supply your seedling with enough water for at least a year while simultaneously protecting it from the harshest environmental conditions.


Good soil for planting your seeds or seedlings in might be acquired from local forested areas. Though forests don't tend to offer much in the way of edibles (for humans), what they do provide is good soil [which is why (stupid) people have been cutting them down for farmland throughout the ages]. If one seeks out locales within the forest where debris, dead leaves and water tend to collect, these are ideal places to find deep reservoirs of soil.
For planting seeds in, dried and pulverized bovine manure works wonderfully.


As trees take years to grow and it may take a while before they offer fruit, similar practices might be applied to the '3 Sisters' guild:
- dig a verticle trench
- fill with soil
- add a couple dozen corn, some beans and some squash seeds
You'll get a kind of corn bushel surrounded by beans and squash, each supporting the other and offering a focus of fruits. Just make sure it's somewhere the local wildlife can't reach. Remember: goats may be able to climb anything but they're not monkeys 'like us'; take advantage of your ability to reach places that other species cannot and that most people will never bother with.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2017, 05:17:05 AM by Socrates »
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ilinda

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Re: setting up from scratch
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2017, 03:03:23 PM »
I submit a new concept: Guerilla Homesteading

Looters of all kind are inherently lazy. That's why governments love their 'slaves in cities' and small farmers have almost been made extinct [with food grown by about 3% of the population nowadays]. Governments centralize themselves and they centralize people so they are easily taxed, controlled, registered, etc. etc. And we fools play right into their hands...

I have heard so many people talking about growing their own food and it begins with: "I'm going to buy me some land first". So after TEOTWAWKI, are your legal claims to said land going to be defended by some governmental forces? Of course not. But you figure we're not there yet so you wanna be able to set up shop and be left alone for now. But 'now' isn't your focus of attention, is it? And what you set up today, don't you want that to be available to you later, as well?

One avoids future loss of all kinds, including government coming in an confiscating your success, by spreading out your endeavours and success. Also, this way you do not require the purchase of any land and that saves you a lot of money, or offers you a way out if you don't have money to begin with.
Looters are lazy; they're not going to be hiking and climbing for hours to pillage some tree you have, especially if they have to go looking for it to begin with.
But you can plant trees anywhere you like, no? And you will know exactly where said trees are, when they fruit, how to get there, etc. Putting all your trees, plants and animals in one place is just putting all your eggs in one basket; why would you even go there?

Permaculture gives us all the tools we need to reclaim lands that conventional farmers and landowners have abandoned as write-offs. But we're talking vast expanses of land here; if 30% of the world's arable lands have already been written off, we're talking millions of hectares for the taking. And all you have to do is find a few promising square meters here and there, plant a tree, put down some soil and plant vegetables, etc. and then remember where you put them.

Orangutans so something similar; they have such good memories that the whole year they move from one fruiting tree to the next throughout the jungle. They're always on the move and their food is spread out everywhere. And yet they're always at the right place at the right time. And you have a great advantage over the orangutan, for you can even plant trees and cultivate specific spots, even if there's no jungle (to begin with).

Trees give so much fruit that even if strangers come by one day and find yours fruiting, they could eat until they're full and there will still be plenty left for everyone. But, anyway, just plant loads of trees so even if some of them are harvested by strangers, you're still left with enough to feed yourself. But most people couldn't recognize a tree to begin with and will ignore your trees unless they are actually bearing fruit. But you'll be planting them where hardly anybody comes by so, again, chances of losing your tree remain slim.
Modern man has this silly idea of a farm surrounded by a few acres of fruit-bearing plants and domesticated animals; there is no reason to limit oneself to such notions. Claim a wide territory as 'yours'; if someone asks you what you're doing while you're on your way to one of your trees, you tell them you're just out on a hike. No need to tell anyone that you're the one who cultivated anything. But you know just where to find them and when...
Some good ideas there, Socrates.  In fact I too have pondered one of many scenarios which could result in a parcel or area of land suddenly being without an owner, and then pondering even further that one or more souls may happen upon such an area, and if desirable looking, just might claim it.  "Finders keepers!"

And I too love the idea of planting nut and fruit trees, both of which need to be planted once, but harvested often!  Yeah, gardens are great, but there is the constant maintenance issue that makes nut and fruit trees seem more attractive.

Now might be a good time to familiarize ourselves with the appearance of various types of food crop trees, because as you point out, most of the year the tree will be not producing a crop and give no clues to the average person that "here lies a goldmine".

Socrates

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a logical extension of permaculture
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2017, 10:56:49 PM »
This concept of guerilla homesteading is nothing more or less than a logical extension of permaculture principles and practice. Conventional farmers and gardeners see their turf as a place that must be constantly irrigated, weeded and otherwise tended. Permaculture, however, treats choice species no different than wild species one might find growing outside, in that no one is out watering or fertilizing the plants in the forest. And yet they do fine, thank you very much.

"Agriculture" is really a misnomer; the Greek ἀγρός refers to a field, but is the field in question (in conventional agriculture) being cultivated? In truth it's being pillaged, mined and/or warped way out of any natural wack. "Culture"? Again i submit: you are defined as much by what you refuse to destroy as you as by what you create; and when it comes to conventional agriculture, there is an awesome amount of destruction taking place and it's really quite misleading to call it "culture" or 'cultivation'.

So if you [finally!] let go of your controlling, warping, abusive attitude toward nature, you are free to roam the countryside and replace more-or-less wasted space being taken up by desert or less useful species with fruit-bearing and otherwise useful species.


What i'm trying to say is that i do not propose this idea for people interested in a life as a hermit or 'nomad' per se; it's just a logical extension of what happens if you follow permaculture principles.
Permaculture is not some extension of agriculture or something. If anything, permaculture is the opposite of agriculture; instead of pillaging, mining and stealing from nature, you start producing, supporting and managing it. In effect, you become a force of good rather than a force of evil; you're part of the solution rather than being part of the problem.

You're gonna want to have a home base (or a few of them), perhaps surrounded by chickens and the like, but at the same time there's no reason you shouldn't be out making yourself master of your environment and spreading your know-how and benevolence as far and wide as you can.
That's not about being 'weird', 'obsessed' or 'extreme'; it's about being responsible.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2017, 08:40:27 AM by Socrates »
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Socrates

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permaculture endgame
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2017, 11:04:26 PM »
That's not about being 'weird', 'obsessed' or 'extreme'; it's just about being responsible.
We all grew up with mainstream ideas about growing food. Actually, this bs has been going on for millennia. That also means that so-called traditional 'knowledge' is meaningless.
Hey, don't shoot the messenger...

I, too, grew up with Little House on the Prairie and Charles Ingalls seems like a competent enough person, if not a good guy; but the reality is that he was actually an incompentent farmer; did he not have to work at the mill to supplement his income? Did he not once go in search of paid labor because his own farm could not support his family [working at a mine for a season]?
Fact is, that even the hero of this independent age, even a fictional character based on ideals and history, was actually quite vulnerable and subjective to chance. This is all mainstream culture has to offer; even their heroes are victims...


If you stop playing the victim ["life's-a-bitch"-and-woe-is-me] card and use the knowledge and insights being given through permaculture to this age, you can liberate yourself from the self-fulfilling-prophecy/victim-orientated culture we all grew up with.
Deal with it...
The facts are the facts; the mainstream/conventional model has destroyed 30% of mankind's arable soils [already!] in just a few decades and demineralized America's soils by 95% in just 50 years. (And if you are at all aware of health concerns, that number should terrify you to your core.)

Fact is, permaculture is all that it promises to be, simultaneously laying bare the failure of conventional models while providing one that actually works to take it's place.
Too good to be true?
What the hell is the INFORMATION AGE good for if not for supplying us with proper food?!
Solidarity or sympathy with either the past or with the masses does not help you in this matter. We are entering a new age, a new millennium; forget the past and the ignorance and folly of the masses. Either that or die, out of your natural, social and empathetic inclination to cling to what has been...
« Last Edit: April 04, 2017, 02:26:32 AM by Socrates »
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Yowbarb

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Re: setting up from scratch
« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2017, 01:05:36 AM »
Socrates, these are really important concepts.
Thanks for sharing them here.

Socrates

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videos
« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2017, 03:12:38 AM »
« Last Edit: May 01, 2017, 03:28:51 AM by Socrates »
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