Author Topic: sheep  (Read 71 times)

Socrates

  • Global Moderator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 564
  • Karma: +13/-0
  • literally, I've seen the end in a vision; DEADLY!
    • TEOMCROTE
sheep
« on: August 31, 2017, 12:17:17 AM »
In modern time sheep have become something of an oddity; where do they fit in?
- milk? not really
- meat? 'no, thanks' [how popular is mutton?]
- wool? "I'll grant you that"...

Practically speaking, we're talking ruminants that flock and eat grass [much like cattle] but can be [thinking Ouessant / Ushant and other small breeds] used for both meat and milk [though not good milk for cheese]. (As a side note i'd like to add that sheep meat is my favorite; i lived with a Moroccan woman for many years and have come to appreciate it very much.)

This vid on keeping sheep just inspired me to remind everyone of the unique characteristics and advantages of keeping sheep.
As long as one stears clear of the large breeds, they do not require vast space to keep [like cattle]. In fact, breeds like Ouessant can survive on quite small areas of grass; also, they're hardy and easy. Now, how does that compare to cattle...?
Sheep are, in fact, like giant guinea pigs in that they live off of mainly grass. (This is very different from, say, goats or rabbits, that eat all kinds of greens and do not fare well on grass alone.) In this way one might say: "Why don't i just keep loads of guinea pigs?" But guinea pigs don't offer wool or milk.

Cattle give better milk [much better for making cheese and butter with] but they are much larger still than sheep [even the smaller breeds]. So in the end sheep are this wonderful-size ruminant that's very much appropriate for small homesteads. Guinea pigs and rabbits are great for survival situations, but sheep would elevate survival to surtrival toute suite; they would be worth saving (if one but had the resources to do so).
« Last Edit: August 31, 2017, 12:57:44 AM by Socrates »
survival database
location, civilisation reboot, PERMACULTURE, postcataclysmic soil, Growing Soil 1.01