Author Topic: Learn the old ways of doing things  (Read 12078 times)

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30411
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Learn the old ways of doing things
« on: December 02, 2009, 09:50:45 AM »
On the old forum, Planet X and 2012 Survivor's Town Hall, I started a thread,
"Learn the old ways of doing things."
  http://planetxforecast.com/discus/messages/368/374.html

I will be copy/pasting here some of the articles books old time recipes and so on.
Members please post here your survival knowledge, your stories of olden times, and references about how
people lived their lives in the wilderness, in the prairie, often before electricity was discovered. What did
they know that we should know? What if we were caught without a power supply for long periods
of time?
What could we do to set aside supplies, can some food when it was available?

All The Best,
Yowbarb



......................................................................................
« Last Edit: December 12, 2010, 04:19:15 PM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30411
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Learn the old ways of doing things
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2009, 11:21:53 AM »
I just copied a couple pages of links from off the old board, links to articles on the Old Timers page of Walton Feed,
but then the links no longer worked. Deleted those posts.
Will be finding and reposting articles.
- Yowbarb


WALTON FEED
http://www.waltonfeed.com/ 

The Old Timer Page
http://www.waltonfeed.com/blog/showCategory/category_id/70
The way we used to do it
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sub Categories

http://www.waltonfeed.com/blog/showCategory/category_id/74


Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30411
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Learn the old ways of doing things
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2009, 12:11:08 PM »
http://www.waltonfeed.com/blog/showCategory/category_id/70

THE OLD TIMER PAGE
The way we used to do it

Sub Categories
Root Cellar Basics
Methods of Cold Storage

Root Cellar Basics
Articles
How we used to do it.... May 22, 2009
The Purpose and Description May 22, 2009

http://www.waltonfeed.com/blog/show/article_id/207
How we used to do it.... May 22, 2009

As told by Glenn Adamson

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30411
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Learn the old ways of doing things
« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2009, 09:46:52 AM »
http://www.waltonfeed.com/blog/showCategory/category_id/70

THE OLD TIMER PAGE
The way we used to do it

Sub Categories
Methods of Cold Storage  Articles
The Ice House May 22, 2009
The Spring House May 22, 2009

http://www.waltonfeed.com/blog/showCategory/category_id/73

Will copy here The Ice House
(and next post will be The Spring House.)
- Yowbarb

=========================================================The Ice House
May 22, 2009

Getting Ice
As told by Clinton Hardy (born 1909)

contents

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30411
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Learn the old ways of doing things
« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2009, 09:51:40 AM »
This is the last one of this series for now,
- Yowbarb


http://www.waltonfeed.com/blog/showCategory/category_id/70

THE OLD TIMER PAGE
The way we used to do it

Methods of Cold Storage  Articles
The Spring House May 22, 2009

A colonial Pennsylvania spring house
Spring houses were small, enclosed one room buildings used before the days of refrigeration to keep food cool. Under the best of circumstances it was built over a spring where the water was coldest as it bubbled up to the surface. Otherwise a small stream was diverted from a nearby creek which ran through the building. The cool water running though the spring house kept the interior of the enclosed building cool. My mother often used this same principle when I was a kid by setting a bottle of milk in the small ditch next to the house. This water coming out of the mountains was as cold as any refrigerator. As pretty as the spring house to the right is, a spring house doesn't need to be extravagant - a little four walled building built out of wood will do.
Kristi Gross supplies us with this charming word picture...
As a youngster I often visited a farm with a spring house. A spring house is a wonderful little building. The one I visited was only about 4 feet high at the roof level. Adults had to bend over to enter. It was a simple little building with a wooden door latched by a hook and eye. This spring house had a hole near the ground on each side, and a stream of water flowing right through the building. A big trough was built in the center of the water with the water always half filling the trough with clear cold water.
This trough was made of wood which sat long ways in the stream. It looked much like a long military rifle box, about a yard long and 6 inches deep with a 2-3 inch crack on the bottom of the short sides for the water to flow through. (If it was made of cement it might prove more long lasting and provide a better cooling effect than one made of wood.) Bottles containing food were placed in the flowing water within this trough. The upper sides of the box kept the bottles from flowing away.
Crocks or jars of milk, butter, eggs, anything my friend, Alma, wanted to keep cold was kept in the spring house and it was my childhood joy to be sent to the spring house after something for her kitchen use. This was especially so in the hot Oklahoma summers as it was always 20-40 degrees cooler here than anyplace outside.
Alma kept her butter in a small wide mouthed mason jar, eggs were in a wire basket and the milk was kept in a large crock and often a large pickle jar. Sometimes she had lemonade or iced tea in the spring house as well when slaughtering was going on. The inner walls of the spring house had shelves where she might set pies and baskets of potatoes, onions, or other garden produce. These were well above the water level of course. Some jars of fruit, vegetables, etc., were stored here as well.
This was used as a 'step-up' from the cellar. Things kept here were also stored in the cellar, but as it took more effort to fetch things from the cellar, things were moved as might be needful up to the spring house for more immediate accessibility.
Her spring house was ideally situated in the farmyard under a big shade tree that also helped to keep it cool. Also kept in the spring house was a metal dipper for drinking purposes, although under present conditions, I don't think this is too practical unless you are absolutely certain your water source is clean. But when I was a child getting sick from drinking the water was the furthest thing from our minds and no one suffered from ill effects from drinking it.

Kristi continues...
My thinking in terms of self-sufficiency issues would be that a souped-up extra fancy spring house could be built today for less than $50 dollars with used lumber scraps and tin, heavily insulated with big pieces of foam insulation that can be found just about anywhere. This could make a super little cool spot for keeping things cool without electricity.
You could also use this same idea, minus the building by inserting a wooden box with holes drilled in the sides and placed in the stream. Or an even less expensive option might be to set a heavy plastic chest with holes drilled for water flow into a stream. Any of these, situated and anchored in a pond, creek or marshy place, could keep items cool enough to keep them from rapidly spoiling.

Copyright Walton Feed.
Web Design By ToolBox Software


Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30411
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30411
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Learn the old ways of doing things
« Reply #6 on: May 07, 2011, 03:40:52 AM »

Home   http://www.waltonfeed.com/
ShopEmergency SuppliesGrinders
Mixers

Rainy Day FoodsBeans
Vegetables
Flour
Fruit
Granola
Dairy
Pasta
Grains
Drink
Baking
Cocoa
Eggs
Meat Substitute
Mixes
Potatoes
Seasoning
Water
Peanut Butter Powder
Snacks
Kits
Signature Real Meats

Sprouting
Books
Storage
OrganicsKamut
Organic Pasta
Organic Oats
Amaranth
Organic Beans
Organic Hard Red Wheat
Spelt
Organic Hulled Millet
Organic Brown Rice
Organic Hulled Buckwheat
Organic Ezekial Mix
Organic Golden Flax
Quinoa

Garden Seeds
Freeze Dried

Catalog
Specials
ResourcesSPROUTING SEEDS AND SPROUTING
PRODUCT INFORMATION
STORAGE LIFE OF DRY FOODS
SOAP MAKING
GARDEN SEEDS
THE OLD TIMER PAGE
GRINDERS
THE RECIPE FILE
BOOKS

Contact Us
Register
Login



Articles

 

Categories

FROM THE OLD TIMERS PAGE
PRODUCT INFORMATION-FRUITS
PRODUCT INFORMATION-COOKING AIDS
PRODUCT INFORMATION-GRANOLA
PRODUCT INFORMATION-VEGETABLES
PRODUCT INFORMATION-BAKING MIXES
SPROUTING SEEDS AND SPROUTING
BREADS AND ROLLS
PRODUCT INFORMATION-PASTAS
PRODUCT INFORMATION-DRINKS
PRODUCT INFORMATION-DAIRY
PRODUCT INFORMATION-FLOURS
PRODUCT INFORMATION
PRODUCT INFORMATION-MEALS
STORAGE LIFE OF DRY FOODS
SOAP MAKING
SOAP MAKING BASICS
SOAP MAKING-SPECIAL HELPS AND DETAILS
GARDEN SEEDS
PRODUCT INFORMATION-IMITATION MEATS
PRODUCT INFORMATION-BEANS AND LEGUMES
THE OLD TIMER PAGE
ROOT CELLAR OLD AND NEW
METHODS OF COLD STORAGE
PRODUCT INFORMATION-GRAINS
GRINDERS
INDIVIDUAL GRINDER INFORMATION
ALL ABOUT GRINDERS
THE RECIPE FILE
PRODUCT INFORMATION-RICE
PRODUCT INFORMATION-SIGNATURE MEATS
BREAKFAST
PRODUCT INFORMATION-FREEZE DRIED FRUITS
PRODUCT INFORMATION-FREEZE DRIED VEGETABLES
PRODUCT INFORMATION-FREEZE DRIED CHEESE
BOOKS

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30411
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Learn the old ways of doing things
« Reply #7 on: September 25, 2011, 11:10:12 AM »
This info may be a repeat from a year ago. Worth a repeat,
Posting here the article names and links. Next posts will have each article so they can be printed out,
Yowbarb
............................................................................................

Walton Feed

http://www.waltonfeed.com/blog/showCategory/category_id/74 


ROOT CELLAR OLD AND NEW

From old to modern-root cellars can be great in preserving your foods.
Articles:
Root Cellar Basics   Jul 20, 2010 
A quide to building your cellar.
LINK: http://www.waltonfeed.com/blog/show/article_id/474

How They Used To Do It.   Mar 10, 2010
From someone who built and used a root cellar.
LINK: http://www.waltonfeed.com/blog/show/article_id/444

An Old Time Dugout Root Cellar   Mar 10, 2010
A pattern of a root cellar-exposed view.
LINK: http://www.waltonfeed.com/blog/show/article_id/443

The Purpose and Description   May 22, 2009
LINK: http://www.waltonfeed.com/blog/show/article_id/206

An brief look into the need and benefit.

..............

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30411
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Learn the old ways of doing things
« Reply #8 on: September 25, 2011, 11:28:49 AM »
Root Cellar Basics   Jul 20, 2010
A quide to building your cellar.
LINK: http://www.waltonfeed.com/blog/show/article_id/474

Root Cellar Basics
Jul 20, 2010
 
Information for this page was gleaned from chapters 7, 13 and 14 of
Root Cellaring: The Simple No-Processing
Way to Store Fruits and Vegetables
By Mike and Nancy Bubel, Copyright 1979, Published by Rodale Press, Emmaus, Pennsylvania  Cool and moist conditions are required for storing most vegetables. Because of this, when planning a root cellar, several things need to be taken into consideration.

Temperature is your most important interest: As your root cellar needs to be kept as cool as possible, there are several things you can do to promote this:

    First, borrow cold from the ground. Earth, even two feet down, gives a remarkable year wide temperature stability. The further down you go the better it is. You must go down a full 10 feet before complete temperature stability is reached. But for the average builder, how deep you go is limited because of expenses.
    You can also borrow cool from the air. Often the night’s air temperature will be cooler than the air in your cellar.
    And finally, you should do what you can to prevent heat from having access to your cellar. This includes:
    Having your root cellar in the shade throughout the day
    Building on the north side of hills
    Wise use of insulation

Your second most important consideration is humidity. Even if kept cool, in a low humidity environment, your vegetables will soften and shrivel up. Most vegetables require high humidities. A typical underground root cellar will generally maintain a high humidity all by itself if it has an earth or dirt floor.

Air circulation: The best root cellars have vents (although none of the old cellars here in Southern Alberta I have seen have them). This is because the vegetables in your cellar give off gasses that often are conducive to either spoilage or sprouting. For example, apples naturally give off ethylene gas which makes potatoes sprout prematurely. (This can be used to your advantage if you have potatoes that are slow sprouting. Put’em both in a plastic bag.) Good venting fundamentals include:

    Have an inlet vent and an outlet vent.
    The outlet must always be at the highest level in the cellar with the outlet tube flush with the inner wall.
    The inlet should come into the cellar at the bottom. This is easily done if your cellar is built into a hill, but nearly as easy if it is buried in flat ground. With your inlet vent opening on top of the ground near your outlet vent, your inlet vent pipe must go all the way to the floor before opening into your cellar.
    Keep shelves a couple of inches away from the walls of the cellar. This will greatly promote circulation around the vegetables stored on these shelves.
    To prevent your potatoes from sprouting prematurely, keep your apples above them so the circulating air moves away from your potatoes.
    Have a system in place to close your vents in freezing weather. Something as simple as a big sponge can work for this. If you have very cold winters, you may wish to block off both ends of each vent pipe.

How big of a cellar should you build?

    A 5 foot by 8 foot root cellar will store 30 bushels of produce.
    An 8 foot by 8 foot cellar should hold plenty for the average family.
    A 10 foot by 10 foot cellar should take care of everything you can produce.

Shelves: We have already mentioned shelves should be kept at least a couple of inches away from the walls for increased ventilation. Other things to consider are:

    Use rot resistant or pressure treated wood. After several years they will be less likely to rot and break, tumbling your foods on the floor. (The book gave one example of a person who went down to her cellar one day to find a good share of her canned fruit and vegetables broken on the floor. As the lids on canned goods rust after a couple of years, plan a dryer, cool place for these items.)
    Liberal use of shelves will enhance the storage capacity of your cellar considerably.

What kind of root cellar is right for you? Here are some possibilities with a few advantages/disadvantages:

    Build your root cellar into a hill.

        You don’t have to find a door lying on the ground when it is under 3 feet of snow.
        There is less chance of flooding during very wet conditions
        Your cellar can be graded so any water that should run or seep in will run out the door.
        Can be much more difficult to excavate.

    Build your root cellar on flat ground.

        Availability: not everyone has a steep hill in their back yard
        Easier to excavate
        Easier and cheaper to build (you don’t have to brace your cellar for all that extra weight from the hill). But that added dirt will keep your cellar cooler!
        You can build a vertical door around a staircase if you don’t want to be shoveling snow to get at a horizontal door.

    Build your cellar as part of your house:
Our house which is only one year old had a root cellar built into it when the house was constructed. Many older houses have a section of the basement that has an earthen floor. It’s primary reason was probably for vegetable storage. You can also:

        Build and insulate a room in this area.
        Dig a cellar next to the house with an entry way to your cellar through the basement.
        Put your cellar in an existing underground structure such as a pump house.

Construction methods:

    Dugout: The cheapest way to go in stable soil
    Wood construction: Be sure to use pressure treated wood.
    Cement
    Floors
        Dirt: the simplest way to go and excellent for humidity control.
        Gravel: In a very damp or very dry area you will want to put down three inches of gravel. If your cellar is unusually wet, you may want to even dig a sump in the middle of your cellar floor and fill this with gravel, along with the three inches on the floor. In very dry soil conditions you can sprinkle water on the gravel which will greatly increase the evaporation surface area.
        Wood: put gaps in your boards for a higher humidity cellar.
        Cement: If you want a storage area that is lower in humidity, this is a good way to go.
        You may wish to build two rooms in your cellar. One with a cement floor for lower humidity storage items, and another room with no floor for higher humidity storage items. If you did this, the wall between the rooms should be as air tight as you can make it. If you have a venting system, you should have a separate set of vents for each room. And lastly, the high humidity storage area should be the far room in the cellar.

Using your root cellar:

    Keep a thermometer and humidity gauge in your cellar.
    Keep the door(s) closed to your cellar as much as possible if it is warm outside.
    During the spring and fall of the year, open your vents (and even perhaps the door) at night when the temperature is dropping below the temperature of the air in your cellar. Close them early in the morning before the outside air warms up. (Be careful not to do this if the temperature is expected to drop below freezing.)
    If the humidity in your cellar is too low you can raise it by:
    Leaving at least the floor of your cellar exposed to the earth (a dirt floor or air gaps in your floor down to the earth).
    Sprinkle water on a graveled floor or lay out damp towels or burlap bags.
    Pack root vegetables in damp saw dust, sand or moss.
    One caution about high humidities: If you get much of a temperature fluctuation in your cellar, humid air as it cools past it’s dew point will condense on the ceiling, walls, and produce. Excess water on your goods can induce spoilage. Cover vegetables with burlap, towels, etc. to absorb excess condensing moisture. Also, if your air is condensing inside, open your vents if the air outside is cooler than it is inside. Even if it is very humid air, as it warms in the root cellar, it’s relative humidity will drop. Of course, the opposite can happen. If you let warm damp air in, moisture will condense out as it cools.
    During extremely cold weather, if your cellar is threatening to freeze, put a light bulb inside. If you do this, you need to cover your potatoes so they won’t turn green. (Do not use a kerosene lantern. Kerosene lanterns produce ethylene, which is a fruit ripener.) Also remember that snow is an excellent insulator. Don’t tramp down or remove the snow on top of your root cellar any more than you have to in order to gain entry.
    Keep a fairly close eye on your produce and remove any that has begun to spoil. (It is a true axiom that 'one bad apple with spoil the bushel.'

Vegetables and their optimum storage conditions

Cold and very moist
(32-40 degrees F and 90-95 % humidity


Carrots
Beets
Parsnips
Rutabagas
Turnips    
Celery
Chinese Cabbage
Celeriac
Salsify
Scorazonera    
Winter radishes
Kohlrabi
Leeks
Collards
Broccoli
  (short term)    Brussels Sprouts
  (short term)
Horseradish
Jerusalem artichokes
Hamburg-rooted parsley
--    --    --    --


Cold and Moist
32-40 degrees F and 80-90% humidity
   
Potatoes
Cabbage
Cauliflower
  (short term)
Apples
Grapes
   (40 degrees F)
Oranges
Pears
Quince
Endive, escarole
Grapefruit


40-50 degrees F and 85-90 % humidity
Cucumbers
Sweet peppers (45-55 degrees F)
Cantaloupe
Watermelon
Eggplant (50-60 degrees F.)
Ripe tomatoes


Cool and Dry 35-40 degrees F 60-70% humidity

Garlic
Onions
Green soybeans in the pod (short term)


Moderately Warm and Dry
50-60 degrees F and 60-70% relative humidity


Dry hot peppers
Pumpkins
Winter squash
Sweet potatoes
Green tomatoes (up to 70 degrees F is OK)


Copyright Walton Feed. Web Design By ToolBox Software

augonit

  • Guest
Re: Learn the old ways of doing things
« Reply #9 on: September 25, 2011, 04:57:27 PM »
My great grandmother had a spring house.  She put her milk in there and nobody was allowed to put their feet in the water.

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30411
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Learn the old ways of doing things
« Reply #10 on: September 29, 2011, 08:40:32 PM »
Sometimes I think it's between her and my granddad who guide me in my gardening ideas and plans, even when I know some of them are unorthodox for most people.

That's interesting...  :) Keep on posting your ideas.
We all have a lot to learn from one another about the really important things, like growing food in the future times.
- Yowbarb

chaunska

  • Guest
Re: Learn the old ways of doing things
« Reply #11 on: October 22, 2011, 10:47:11 PM »
How to brain tan a hide the old way...
Well, gotta get a hide.   Soak it in  hardwood ash and water for 24 hrs...put in enough ash until an egg floats.   This will swell the epidermis.   you can put the hide in a stream and allow the running water to take off most of the hair.   Scrape off the remaining hair and epidermis with a draw knife or a sharpened piece of wood that is about the same shape.   

Rinse in clear water...a stream works well again for this.  Ring out completely with a stick twisting it around a branch.  After wrung, take the brain and rub it into both sides of the hide.   If you have a blender available, blend the brain with about 3 cups of water and slosh the hide around in while in a small tub.   If the brains are warmed up, it works better and penetrates better...never warm up to a temperature that you can't keep your hand in. 

Ring the hide out and catch the slurry to save for a second braining.   Stretch the hide on a frame  and begin working it with a boat paddle, pressing and squeezing out excessive moisture.   

It should start to "whiten" out as you push and scrape.   The edges will dry first, so work on the edges first.   If you don't have a frame, you can stretch and work the hide by hand...this is more work.   

If the hides needs to be softer, repeat the braining process.

After completely dry and soft, smoke the hide.   The creosote penetrates the fibers of the hide and causes it to remain soft when it gets wet with very little working.

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30411
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Learn the old ways of doing things
« Reply #12 on: October 16, 2012, 02:46:49 PM »
Yowbarb Note: This article doesn't give actual instructions just some ideas
for discussion.
...
http://www.ehow.com/info_8418903_pioneer-project-ideas.html

Pioneer Project Ideas
By Emma Black, eHow Contributor

n the 1700s and 1800s it was part of everyday life for pioneers to build homes out of sod, bonnets out of an old dress and bridges out of rope. Today's modern technology makes us take for granted the sweat and labor that went into living in a time before inventions like the modern cooking oven or the car. Here are a few pioneer project ideas for those who have the itch to live like the early settlers did.    Does this Spark an idea?

Build a Bridge
Bridges were an integral part of how many settlers were able to cross rivers and ravines. As the people who originally navigated these regions, many settlers had to rely on their own know-how and bridge-making knowledge. There are many bridges that can be made by anyone who wishes to create a way to cross from one point to another. Examples of bridges from the pioneer times include: monkey bridges, single lock bridges, single trestle bridges, draw bridges, suspension bridges, friction bridges, and the Troop 185 bridge.

Build A Catapult
Catapults were one of the earliest inventions for fighting and defending, spanning from ancient times into more modern times. Many Boy Scout Troops in the '60s and '70s would make catapults as a project as well. Types of catapults that are good examples of pioneer projects are the two-person catapult, the Troop 10 catapult and the Ballista catapult. Designs have become more complex throughout the years, but the intent of a catapult is the same regardless of when it was made -- to hurl an object quickly through the air at an intended target.

Old Fashioned Cooking and Baking
On the simpler and easier side of pioneer project ideas are made-from-scratch baking and cooking. In the pioneer era, stove tops and ovens were a very new invention and for the most part hadn't become a part of many pioneer women's kitchens. Pioneering settlers cooked many meals over an open fire, preserved fruits more often, and these men and women also made many goods artisanally, such as cheese and hand-churned butter. Homemade beef jerky was also commonly made, as was cooking cornmeal, breads and other meals over a campfire.

Sewing
Pioneering projects did not just involve building homes and baking meals from scratch. They also involved sewing projects such as making clothing, bonnets, rugs, curtains and other household linens. There are various guides online that can teach anyone to sew an authentic prairie bonnet. Clothes patterns for prairie-inspired dresses are also available in many books or on some Internet sites. Many of these creations use a simple cross-stitch, considering that sewing machines were not patented until 1830.

Read more: Pioneer Project Ideas | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/info_8418903_pioneer-project-ideas.html#ixzz29V7caSUO
Read more: Pioneer Project Ideas | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/info_8418903_pioneer-project-ideas.html#ixzz29V6mFcDL

Endtimesgal_2012

  • Guest
Re: Learn the old ways of doing things
« Reply #13 on: October 17, 2012, 08:59:21 AM »
When we can no longer run to the store and purchase things, the old ways of doing things will become very important.  Now is a good time to practice these skills while there is time for it.  Many of us take for granted being able to run to the store for a loaf of bread, and few people actually know how to make it from scratch.  One of the primary ingredients is yeast.

Here are some interesting and easy ways to make yeast:

How to Make Yeast for Bread

Step 1:  This step pulls yeast from the air in your kitchen.  The more you bake with yeast, the more you’ll have in your kitchen, so be sure to capture yeast shortly after you bake bread.
Combine in a medium sized bowl:  2 cups warm water, 1 tablespoon white table sugar, 2 cups of flour.  Cover the bowl with a cheesecloth and place in a warm area of your kitchen.  Stir every day at last once.  When it bubbles, it means you have captured yeast from the air.  From then on, just allow it to sit for 3-4 days to continue to bubble.

Step 2:  This step makes the yeast into something you can use.  After the 3-4 days of bubbling, prepare a cookie sheet or dehydrator tray with plastic wrap or waxed paper.  Thinly spread the liquid mixture on the prepared tray.  When dry, break the dried yeast into small chunks.  Grind into a powder (food processor or mortar and pestle>)  Use what you need.  For longer, place in an air tight container and store for short term in the refrigerator.  For long term storage, freeze in the container.

Step 3:  This step shows how to use the yeast you make.  This yeast isn’t as concentrated as he yeast you purchase at the store since it is mostly flour, so plan to use 1 cup of homemade yeast for one ounce of store bought yeast.
Take one cup of liquid that your recipe calls for and dissolve one cup of homemade yeast in it.  Make the dough, making sure to reduce the flour you need by one cup (because your yeast is mostly flour).  Knead and rise dough as usual, which may take longer to do.  Bake as usual.

Using Potato Water to make yeast
Get a potato from your garden or purchase a potato at the store, making sure it is an ORGANIC potato (potatoes sprayed with herbicide or pesticides will not work as well and may hurt you.)  DO NOT WASH THE POTATO if it has dirt on it; just wipe it clean with a dry dishtowel.  Cut the potato in half, put it in a large mug or bowl and pour two cups of warm (not hot) water over it.

Let set for two days….you’ll see bubbles or a kind of froth on the top of the water.  Fish out the potato and add it to the compost heap.  Add 1/4th cup of flour and one teaspoon of sugar to the potato water and stir gently.  Let it set overnight….there’s your starter for many loaves of bread.  Use one cup of starter for two loaves of bread.  Add one cup warm water, ½ cup flour and a teaspoon of sugar/honey to replenish your starter each time you use some.  It can be kept in a small stoneware crock in a cool dark corner of your cupboard or pantry.

Using raisins: 
Put about ¼ cup raisins in a jar and cover with one cup warm water.  Put on lid and shake to stir.  Let sit for 3 days, each day, gently shake to stir raisins and open the jar to breathe and then reseal.  When the raisins start to bubble and fizz, test by unscrewing the jar lid and if you hear a fizz when opening, then the yeast is done.  Drain yeast water in a bowl and add enough flour to mix with the liquid to create a small ball.  Cover and let sit until it forms a sponge.  Now use to make bread.  Same as described above.

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30411
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Learn the old ways of doing things
« Reply #14 on: October 17, 2012, 04:55:11 PM »
Endtimesgal! What a wonderful post!  :) I hope lots of Members print out the ideas from this Topic, which I am sure will be good info to have in the future.
- Yowbarb