Author Topic: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food  (Read 10132 times)

Yowbarb

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Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
« on: July 17, 2010, 08:16:42 AM »
Hi All
I saw an old post Linda put up in the Moderator's section.
Looks like good info to learn and start using.
Would like to copy paste it below,
Yowbarb

...
Re: 12 Months Harvest

http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=12+month+harvest&tag=googhydr-20&index=stripbooks&hvadid=6744527205&ref=pd_sl_2xbb1z2e3g_b
« Last Edit: January 20, 2011, 08:18:11 AM by Yowbarb »

Yowbarb

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Re: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2011, 08:35:41 AM »
To whom it may concern: We lost part of this topic when we had problems and had to switch to the
new Town Hall. Will try to find and repost some items, since a lot of good info was lost.
Yowbarb

Ed Douglas

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Re: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2011, 03:07:42 PM »
I'm not sure if this goes here, but I remember my parents using the Farmers Almanac for lots of info with when to plant, and all that kind of stuff. It was mostly by the moon and what stage it was in, "harvesting moon", etc.  Although the info might(probably) won't be good for afterwards, but the methods it uses is very good knowledge to have.  ed

Yowbarb

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Re: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
« Reply #3 on: January 20, 2011, 08:17:29 AM »
I'm not sure if this goes here, but I remember my parents using the Farmers Almanac for lots of info with when to plant, and all that kind of stuff. It was mostly by the moon and what stage it was in, "harvesting moon", etc.  Although the info might(probably) won't be good for afterwards, but the methods it uses is very good knowledge to have.  ed

Ed it's nteresting that everyone seemed to know these things in past eras.

Back in the 1960s when there was such a back to the earth movement I did learn a few things...
Couldn't google anything in those days...read some in farmer's almanac... about waxing and waning moon and whether to plant or cut
down weed/harvest...
Mother Earth News was aso a wealth of information. I applied what little I had learned and turned the whole front yard into one flourishing
field of cabbage. I moved out, as I was wont to do, but the former roomate gal told me they sprang up out of the ground..

I also read organic gardening and read that in Russia at the time they didn't use pesticides they used natural enemies of pests and they used
like garlic, etc. to ward off pests. When I planted the cabbage I set in garlic and onions around the entire perimeter, set in close and all in between each row.
It's been a long time since I did that ....

This is a link for anyone interested in the Mother Earth News archives... Barb
https://www.motherearthnews.com/order/order.aspx?promocode=MMEGOAZ1&gclid=CKDsya6WyaYCFYXu7QodkW1gIA 

Ed Douglas

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Re: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
« Reply #4 on: January 20, 2011, 10:06:20 AM »
Marigolds are good to put around tomatoe plants, if I remember correctly. Wow! Old people like myself, might have some use, afterall.  ed

augonit

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Re: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
« Reply #5 on: January 20, 2011, 10:16:11 AM »
I use marigolds, zinnias and geraniums along the perimeter of my garden to help keep bugs out.  I think it's because they are "stinky" that makes bugs go the other way.  Using that theory, I was in desparate need to protect my roses last year and planted oregano around them.  It worked!  I think dill keeps tomatoe hornworms away.  I'll have to try that one.

noproblemo2

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Re: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
« Reply #6 on: January 20, 2011, 10:28:40 AM »
Mint around your house deters mice.

Lori

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Re: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
« Reply #7 on: January 20, 2011, 10:43:30 AM »
I alt try that.  We have Little field mice here that somehow get in my house. 

Mint around your house deters mice.

Ed Douglas

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Re: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
« Reply #8 on: January 20, 2011, 10:58:56 AM »
I think there is a reason farmers plant sunflowers around corn fields, but can't remember.  ed

Yowbarb

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Re: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2011, 12:33:24 PM »
I think there is a reason farmers plant sunflowers around corn fields, but can't remember.  ed

Ed I had never heard of that...
I think I half - remember sunflowers on my Grandmother's and Aunt Grace's little farm in Colorado...
Too late to find out why they had them there. They had corn... My Grandmother was from Missouri and the article below mentions the Missouri settlers learned about sunflowers from the  Native Americans.
It is a good food, for the seeds and the oil, the excvess helps the bird population, cattle can feed on the throwaway parts... a good thing to have live seeds for in the Aftertime.. - Yowbarb

http://www.jeffersoninstitute.org/pubs/sunflower.shtml
Sunflowers a Native Oilseed with a Growing Market
"Weed control," [Note but first have to put down a grass weed killer to help the seedlings not be attacked. Once they are grown they are failry resistent to weeds and pests.]
"By adding sunflower to an existing crop rotation, pest problems such as corn borer or soybean cyst nematode can be reduced."



...

Yowbarb

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Re: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2011, 12:50:16 PM »
What keeps moles away?  I have a terrible mole problem.  Since they don't like the smell of garlic, I planted garlic all over my yard to see if they will stay away.  I've even found two of them in my basement!  Any mole deterent ideas would be greatly appreciated. (not traps).

Augonit I hope this helps: From Yahoo UK Note: As always watch out for yard poisons if kids will play
there.

Question: How do i get rid of garden moles without killing them?
http://uk.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20070605075804AA4Ho8w

Best Answer - Chosen by Asker
"Almost all of the information you've been given is correct ... windmills, pepper, certain plants, traps, and yes even certain types of urine ... are all good deterrents. However, each of these solutions can have it's limitations depending on the size of your yard and your resolve ... because they don't really solve the heart of the problem, which is grubs.

As it is now, you obviously have enough grubs to keep the little buggers happy ... but once you run the moles off, there is nothing left to feast on the grubs and you can expect your grub population to multiply ... so if and when the food supply runs low at the neighbors house or you start to let your guard down ... guess where they are going to turn. On the other hand, just using grub killer isn't going to get rid of them over night because it's going to take some time to work.

So, my suggestion would be a two part solution - for the long term, visit your local home improvement center or nursery to get some grub killer. Check with them for your area, but you're most likely going to have to put it down 2-3 times a year like the previous poster said. For the short term, any of the deterrents listed will work ... you just need to figure out which one is right for you ... because depending on your situation and the size of your yard ... you may end up needing to use a combination of deterents.

And to answer those who want to know why you would want to get rid of moles in the first place. They can leave the surface of your yard terribly unstable, which can be very dangerous for anyone with little ones or elderly ones walking around the yard."

Other Answers:
"sprinkle dried crushed hot red pepper everywhere in your garden. plants will be fine, moles don't like it. "

"there is a plant if you go to any plant nusery they can help

or just moth balls in all the holes

i also heard chillie pepper works but it didnt work for me the plant did."

"you could try planting some gopher purge, artemisia (wormwood), basil, chamomile, flax, garlic, lemon balm, mint, rosemary, marigolds, sage, petunia, or nasturtium."

"SpectracideTriazicide eliminates the grub worms on which the moles feast. Cover your yard according to instructions with SpectracideTriazicide 2-3 time per year or as needed.
Works really well for me."

"This is an easy one. Find the entrance to one of their active tunnels. To do this, look for fresh dirt stirred up around the entrance to the tunnel. Get a 5 gallon bucket and dig down into the ground at the mouth of the tunnel deep enough to place the 5 gallon bucket completely in the ground. Place another bucket over both the entrance to the tunnel and the bucket in the ground.

The moles will come out of their tunnel and fall into the bucket that you have in the ground and you can take them on a trip into the country. If you haven't caught the mole in a day or two, move the bucket and try another tunnel entrance.
Source(s):
This month's edition of the Family Handyman magazine has a small article on this. Check it out!"


"...Fox Urine, they are a natural predator and the moles and chipmunks will move on if they smell there scent in their vicinity. Try an Agway store to find it, or look it up on line.
Windmill style mole chasers send an annoying vibration into the earth witch also drives them away. Also most rodents hate mothballs, which are easily dropped down their holes."

I tried hot pepper and it worked for a wile but then I tried and yes it may sound sick but human urine, No shi t !!! I poured some around the outside of my garden and a little inside and the moles left in a big hurry, I do this every year now and the moles have not been a problem, same goes for the neighborhood cats, squirrels, rabbits, and any other animal that feasted on all my vegetables every year. If nothing else works try it.


Yowbarb Note: If you don't recognize the names of the stores, procducts or publications, that is probably because this is from the UK. I have no idea if human urine would work that well but for sure it doesn't cost anything.

Yowbarb

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Re: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
« Reply #11 on: January 20, 2011, 12:51:36 PM »
I use marigolds, zinnias and geraniums along the perimeter of my garden to help keep bugs out.  I think it's because they are "stinky" that makes bugs go the other way.  Using that theory, I was in desparate need to protect my roses last year and planted oregano around them.  It worked!  I think dill keeps tomatoe hornworms away.  I'll have to try that one.

Great to know, thanks augonit, also thanks Susan for tip on mint!  ;)

Yowbarb

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Re: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
« Reply #12 on: January 20, 2011, 06:34:25 PM »
I've got to try the moth ball thing.  I'd love to know what plant they were referring to so I can get that too.  I liked those ideas, but if I'm totally desperate enough to put my own urine out there, I'll have to do it after dark.

Hi, just noticed your post; I was gone - here are some plants.  They were in a post on the page I pasted...
Yowbarb
"you could try planting some gopher purge, artemisia (wormwood), basil, chamomile, flax, garlic, lemon balm, mint, rosemary,
marigolds, sage, petunia, or nasturtium."

Yowbarb

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Re: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
« Reply #13 on: July 28, 2011, 10:53:13 PM »
As I have posted before, in the survival shelter, it will be a good idea to have someone whose responsibility it is
to carry on the cultivation of yogurt, sprouts, mushrooms etc.
Article below on how to make yogurt with no electricity,
Yowbarb
...

http://www.greenfootsteps.com/how-to-make-yogurt.html

How to Make Yogurt at Home in a Flask

Yogurt is quite easy to make at home. If you just want to make yogurt, probably the easiest all round solution is to buy a yogurt maker and just follow the instructions!

But maybe you want to be more independent of the electricity supply. How to make yogurt - the finished articleOr, maybe you just want to know how to make yogurt because you are curious as to how it's done - or because you just can't get enough of this fabulous healthy food!

Whatever the reasons, here is a very simple guide to making yogurt at home without the aid of a yogurt maker, or even electricity. You can use commercial yogurt starters - or not. While these are much easier to find than formerly, yogurt cultures from the yogurt in your fridge will usually serve nicely to begin with.

If you want to live a healthier and greener life, learning how to make yogurt is another good skill to have. And homemade yogurts can be just as delicious as factory made ones.

If you want to read a little more about the whys and wherefores of eating yogurt, please see fermented foods.
http://www.greenfootsteps.com/fermented-food.html

Here's what you need to make yogurt at home

A good quality vacuum flask, preferably a wide mouthed one. If you live in a very warm country you might not even need that. I have seen yogurt made in bowls in India without any artificial heat.

How to make yogurt - temperature

Yogurt needs to be kept at around 100 degrees Fahrenheit, or slightly better, in order to culture a batch of milk. Yogurt was almost certainly discovered by people carrying milk in animal skins. A combination of wild cultures and continual warmth would have supplied the necessary conditions for yogurt to develop.

Next, you need a supply of milk. You can use cow's milk, goat's milk or sheep's milk. I'm sure camel's milk is entirely possible but I've not tasted it so far! You can make yogurt at home using any or all of the common types of milk on sale, including soy milk.

Most, essentially, you need some yogurt as a starter. Use fresh, good quality yogurt from a reputable source. Avoid any with thickeners or other additives as the culture may be dead or nearly so.

You can also buy good yogurt starters in health food shops and specialist shops.

You also need bowls or a mixing jug and spoons. A whisk is handy. A hot drink vacuum flask will work - it's just harder to clean than a wide-necked one.

That's it!

How to make yogurt - which milk to use

The milk can be full-fat cow's milk or half-skimmed or fully-skimmed. There is a tendency for everyone to want skimmed-milk yogurt as it is seen as healthier.

Full-fat yogurt is generally less than 10 percent fat so it can find a place in most people's diets. It does tend to have a richer, fuller flavour. A richer yogurt can be made by adding dried milk to full or half-fat milk.

You can also use soy milk if you like. I haven't yet tried to make yogurt at home with any of the nut or grain milks.

Here's how to make yogurt just using a common or garden vacuum flask to keep it warm.

How to make yogurt in a vacuum flask
Take the yogurt you are going to use as starter out of the fridge or cooler the day before you want to make yogurt. This lets the yogurt come up to room temperature. (This is optional, if you start with the milk temperature slightly high - but be careful not to over-do it and kill the culture!)

Measure your flask so that you know how much liquid can be accommodated. Measurements here are for a flask of one pint.

Heat just under a pint of fresh milk on the stove. Bring it up to just below boiling point and then let it cool to around 100 degrees Fahrenheit. A thermometer is useful but not strictly necessary. The milk should feel just slightly warm to touch. Blood heat is around 37 degrees Centigrade (98.4 F). If you drop a drop of milk on the back of your hand it should not feel noticeably hot or cold. Anywhere from 95 to 105 degrees F is fine.

Easy Recipes

A note on sterilisation
If you prefer to take no chances, it's best to sterilise the milk first. To do this, heat the milk to just under boiling point. Keep it at this temperature for a couple of minutes, stirring to prevent burning, and then let it cool to around 100 degrees.

If you are making yogurt for young children, or frail or elderly folk it is always advisable to sterilise first.

(You can, of course, make yogurt without sterilising the milk - just warm it slowly so as not to overheat it. When it gets to around 100 degrees F just turn off the heat and proceed as follows. I have tried this but I'm not sure the yogurt is as good. It's your choice.)

Next, take a good spoonful of fresh yogurt (unflavoured) and mix it into the milk. Use a whisk to ensure that the yogurt is well distributed. You are not actually whisking it, just mixing it thoroughly. A fork will do if you haven't a whisk.

Pour the milk and yogurt mix into a wide-necked thermos and make sure that the lid is tightly stoppered. Wrap the flask in a towel to minimise heat loss through the lid. Put the flask in a warm place such as an airing cupboard or above the boiler.

In about 24 hours your yogurt should be ready. If conditions are not ideal it can take longer.

If you don't have a vacuum flask you can still make yogurt. It's just a bit more fiddly.

[More info on page:  http://www.greenfootsteps.com/how-to-make-yogurt.html ]

Yowbarb

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Re: Miscellaneous info on growing and storing food
« Reply #14 on: December 20, 2011, 10:00:33 AM »
Grow your own food in a grow dome,
Barb Townsend
Topic Administrator

http://www.monolithic.com/stories/grow-your-food-in-a-monolithic-cabin-grow-dome
Why grow your own?
Good question! Can’t we just keep making our weekly stock-up trip to the supermarket? Well of course you can.
But there are some growing (pun intended) reasons not to: 1) Tainted food has become more prevalent; 2) More people means a greater need for food; 3) The price of non-processed food continues rising; 4) Home-grown produce can be picked and eaten at its prime time – not when its green, truck-ripened and flavorless.
Many people would like to grow their own food but simply have no place to do so. Others may have garden space but feel the climate is against them: too warm, too cold, no rain, too much rain, storms and tornadoes, too short of a growing season.
A Monolithic Cabin Grow-Dome
In a Monolithic Cabin, food can be grown 365 days a year. But make no mistake – this is not a greenhouse. It’s an enclosed, climate controlled Monolithic Cabin. As such, it can be:
•   Easily maintained at a specific temperature
•   Utilized during the entire year
•   Cleaned and hosed down
•   Outfitted with trays to grow food hydroponically or in soil
Other Advantages
Typically, only 10% of the water used to grow food outdoors is needed to grow it indoors.
A Monolithic Cabin is energy efficient and can maintain a specific temperature with a minimum of heating or air conditioning. That eliminates the worry of plants either freezing or burning.
Light necessary to grow the food can be supplied by a LED system specifically tuned for plant development, a MPS system with a complete solar spectrum in its light or fluorescents. Both LED and MPS use a fraction of the energy that traditional lighting requires. So it’s affordable, and it does not produce unwanted heat.
The Monolithic Cabin Grow-Dome can be purchased with all desired fixtures, such as trays, lighting, watering, etc. or it can be purchased and then fitted-out by the owner. It can be transported to virtually any location and installed on any properly prepared site.
Note: LED stands for Light Emitting Diode. MPS stands for Microwave Powered Sulfur lamps. Many websites, including Wikipedia, have information on both.
 ................