Author Topic: Plants for non - food survival uses  (Read 10045 times)

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30414
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Plants for non - food survival uses
« Reply #15 on: December 13, 2011, 02:22:38 PM »
hey this auzi tree oil... is it something they are now able to grow in other parts of the world, guess i could google it but it's late and i'm just curious as not all of oz is sunny and nice they have a Canada like area.. so if it's a tree that can grow there i may be interested in growing it here. i grow a bunch of crazy herbals, i just got a bunch of seeds from an importer and am putting them in tomorrow the ones that need to be placed b4 a winter so they get cold then warm... i'll definitely post pictures next summer, most r either medicinal or of the beneficial to other plants type.
Hello Deathanyl. I appreciate your posts. You can keep us posted on how it's all growing... and what importers are good...
All The Best,
Yowbarb

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30414
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Plants for non - food survival uses
« Reply #16 on: November 25, 2012, 06:07:36 AM »
http://www.motherearthnews.com/natural-health/yucca-soap-yucca-shampoo-zmaz81mjzraw.aspx

Make Yucca Soap and Yucca Shampoo

Yucca root can easily become yucca soap and yucca shampoo if you follow these directions.
The various species of yucca — some of which are known today as Spanish bayonet, Adam's-needle, soapweed, datil, whipple or dagger plant — were of prime economic importance to many native tribes of the American Southwest. The sharp-pointed, waxy leaves furnished excellent fibers for weaving. The long flower stalks and creamy white blossoms were used by the Apaches as food. And  most important for our purposes,  the roots of the yucca provided many native Americans with natural shampoo and natural laundry soap

Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/natural-health/yucca-soap-yucca-shampoo-zmaz81mjzraw.aspx#ixzz2DF93fVyI

Yucca root (called a mole) contains the compound saponin, which has detergent properties and seems to exert a particularly beneficial effect on the protein in animal fiber.
 
And there's no reason why you can't try making yucca soap and yucca shampoo yourself, because the versatile plants — formerly classified as Liliaceae, but more recently placed in the new family Agavaceae — are found in the southwestern (and, to some extent, southeastern) United States, Mexico and the West Indies.
 
You Can Dig It!
 
Yucca root can be gathered at any time of the year, provided the ground isn't frozen. However, since regulations regarding wild plant collection vary, be sure to check your state's laws before you begin to dig. Then, if there aren't any restrictions on gathering yuccas in your area, select a small- to medium-sized plant that can be dug up without too much difficulty — even a young bush will yield enough roots for a dozen or so shampoos.
 
Next, remove all loose dirt with a stiff brush or old rag, and use a small hatchet to chop the roots into manageable (potato-size) pieces. Now, with a sharp paring knife, cut off the hairlike extensions and the outer root covering, being careful to keep the newly exposed surfaces as clean as possible.
 
Once that's done, whack the peeled pieces into smaller chunks (about the size of ice cubes) and use a hammer or blender to pulverize these pieces of root into a pulp. When the mush's color has changed from white to light amber, your new shampoo is ready to be used, dried, or frozen (yucca keeps well when preserved by either of the two methods).
 
Shampoo Storage

If you'd like to sun-dry the roots, spread the material thinly on a clean surface and leave it in direct sunshine until all of its moisture has evaporated. (When the squeezed pulp is no longer sticky and spongy — but feels sort of crackly — it's dry enough to be stored.)


Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/natural-health/yucca-soap-yucca-shampoo-zmaz81mjzraw.aspx#ixzz2DF8ttlal

Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/natural-health/yucca-soap-yucca-shampoo-zmaz81mjzraw.aspx#ixzz2DF8VNlJj


IMAGE:  With the roots of the yucca plant you can make yucca shampoo and yucca soap.
             MOTHER EARTH NEWS STAFF
.....

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30414
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Plants for non - food survival uses
« Reply #17 on: November 25, 2012, 06:11:41 AM »
http://www.motherearthnews.com/natural-health/yucca-plants-arthritis-zmaz77zbon.aspx

Yucca Plants Provide Natural Relief for Arthritis Pain
 
Learn how yucca plants can be become a natural supplement for arthritis pain. Originally published ...

The spiny yucca plant — used for centuries as a staple food by Indians of the southwestern U.S. — may offer hope for the 20 million Americans who suffer from some form of arthritis. At least, that seems to be the bottom line of a study conducted by California physicians Robert Bingham and Bernard A. Bellew (and reported in The Journal of Applied Nutrition, Vol. 27, No. 2).

In the Bingham-Bellew study, 165 arthritis victims — aged 11 to 92 — were given from two to eight yucca extract tablets per day for up to five months. (A control group of 51 patients received placebos, or non-medicinal tablets. None of the patients who participated in the study knew which kind of pills — yucca or placebo — he/she was receiving.)

The results: 49 percent of the patients who'd taken yucca tablets felt that the pills had had an overall beneficial effect on their symptoms. By contrast, only 21 percent of the patients who got placebos reported any improvement in their condition.

Perhaps more strikingly, 60 percent of all patients receiving yucca extract said that they felt less swelling, pain, and stiffness after trying the pills. And more than 90 percent of these people — when asked — said that they'd noticed no unpleasant effects stemming from their "yucca therapy".

Dr. Bingham — who has treated well over 1,000 patients with yucca pills during the past two years — says that persons who suffer gastrointestinal disturbances with their arthritis seem to derive the greatest benefit from yucca therapy. He adds: "The pills seem to be useful also in treating some patients who have had chronic headaches in connection with joint discomfort."


Yucca Plants Provide Natural Relief for Arthritis Pain
 
(Page 2 of 2)

By the MOTHER EARTH NEWS editors
 January/February 1977

How does yucca extract act to alleviate some of the symptoms of arthritis? No one knows. In fact, there's no reason why yucca saponin (the substance of which the yucca pills are made) should exert any direct effect on the human body, since it's not absorbed into the bloodstream. Drs. Bingham and Bellew, however, suggest that the substance probably brings about relief indirectly, by reducing (or otherwise altering) the production of toxins in the intestinal tract.

The two California physicians make no claims that yucca pills can "cure" arthritis ... nor do they say that most people who try the tablets can expect relief from arthritis symptoms. (This is only reasonable. There are more than a hundred forms of the disease we call "arthritis", and it'd be unrealistic — to say the least — to think that any single medicine could produce a panacea-like cure for the condition.)

One thing's certain: It can't hurt a person to try yucca tablets. According to Dr. Bingham, there's virtually no danger of allergic reactions (or conflicts between yucca and other medications) arising, since the pills' main ingredient is never actually absorbed into the body.

More research will, of course, be needed before anyone knows for sure just hour valuable a medicine yucca saponin is. For now, suffice it to say that the substance has — at least in some cases — proven effective as an arthritis remedy ... and that the desert yucca-valued by Indian cultures for many centuries-may soon prove just as useful to modern medical science.


Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/natural-health/yucca-plants-arthritis-zmaz77zbon.aspx?page=2#ixzz2DFAE31tC

Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/natural-health/yucca-plants-arthritis-zmaz77zbon.aspx?page=2#ixzz2DFA8er1e

Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/natural-health/yucca-plants-arthritis-zmaz77zbon.aspx#ixzz2DF9sTlGk

Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/natural-health/yucca-plants-arthritis-zmaz77zbon.aspx#ixzz2DF9nfQEW

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30414
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Plants for non - food survival uses
« Reply #18 on: April 09, 2013, 11:00:22 PM »
hey this auzi tree oil... is it something they are now able to grow in other parts of the world, guess i could google it but it's late and i'm just curious as not all of oz is sunny and nice they have a Canada like area.. so if it's a tree that can grow there i may be interested in growing it here. i grow a bunch of crazy herbals, i just got a bunch of seeds from an importer and am putting them in tomorrow the ones that need to be placed b4 a winter so they get cold then warm... i'll definitely post pictures next summer, most r either medicinal or of the beneficial to other plants type.

I'd like to hear more about that tree and its uses...
Belated thanks for your post.

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30414
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Plants for non - food survival uses
« Reply #19 on: April 09, 2013, 11:07:17 PM »
http://eartheasy.com/blog/2011/04/5-easy-to-grow-mosquito-repelling-plants/

5 Easy to Grow Mosquito-Repelling Plants

Before reaching for the chemical sprays, try planting these easy-to-grow plants which have natural mosquito-repelling properties…

By Eartheasy.com Posted Apr 28, 2011

As the outdoor season approaches, many homeowners and outdoor enthusiasts look for ways to control mosquitoes. With all the publicity about the West Nile virus, mosquito repelling products are gaining in popularity. But many commercial insect repellents contain from 5% to 25% DEET. There are concerns about the potential toxic effects of DEET, especially when used by children. Children who absorb high amounts of DEET through insect repellents have developed seizures, slurred speech, hypotension and bradycardia.

There are new DEET-free mosquito repellents on the market today which offer some relief to those venturing outdoors in mosquito season. But there are also certain plants which are easy to grow and will have some effect in repelling mosquitoes from areas of your home and garden.

Here are five of the most effective mosquito repelling plants which are easy to grow in most regions of the US:

1. Citronella

CitronellaCitronella is the most common natural ingredient used in formulating mosquito repellents. The distinctive citronella aroma is a strong smell which masks other attractants to mosquitoes, making it harder for them to find you. Although citronella is used in many forms, such as scented candles, torches and citronella ‘scented’ plants, the living plant is more effective because it has a stronger smell.

Citronella is a perennial ‘clumping’ grass which grows to a height of 5 – 6 feet. It can be grown directly in the ground in climate zones where frost does not occur. If grown in the garden or near the patio, it should be planted in the ‘background’, behind small decorative flowers and shrubs. In northern climate zones citronella can be grown in a large pot or planter, ideally with casters, so it can be rolled indoors during winter.

Gardening centers usually sell citronella as small plants in pots, ready to transplant to a larger pot or into raised garden beds on the ground. Once established, new plants can be propagated in early spring by splitting large clumps into smaller sections and replanting the new ‘starts’ in pots or other areas of the garden. Citronella plants are considered low maintenance, like most grasses, and they do best in full sun and well-drained locations. Periodic applications of nitrogen-rich fertilizers will ensure vigorous growth, but this treatment only needs to be applied once a year, preferably in early spring.

When purchasing citronella, look for the true varieties, Cybopogon nardus or Citronella winterianus. Other plants may be sold as ‘citronella scented’, but these do not have the mosquito repelling qualities of true citronella.

2. Horsemint

HorsemintAlso known as Beebalm, Horsemint is an adaptable perennial plant which repels mosquitoes much the same as citronella. It gives off a strong incense-like odor which confuses mosquitoes by masking the smell of its usual hosts.

Horsemint is a fast growing, shade-tolerant and drought-resistant plant which reaches a height and width of 2 – 3 feet. It does well in dry, sandy soil and can tolerate salty conditions, which is why it is often found in coastal and beach areas. Horsemint seeds can be sown indoors in trays for later transplanting, or sown directly into the ground in late summer in colder climate zones. Midwest and Eastern growing zones are favoured for growing horsemint.

Mature horsemint plants can be divided in spring and fall by dividing into small sections and transplanting into permanent locations. Horsemint can also be planted in pots for moving indoors in cold climate zones.

Horsemint leaves can be dried and used to make herbal tea. Its flowers will also attract bees and butterflies to your garden.

3. Marigolds

MarigoldsCommonly grown as ornamental border plants, marigolds are hardy annual plants which have a distinctive smell which mosquitoes, and some gardeners, find particularly offensive. Marigolds contain Pyrethrum, a compound used in many insect repellents.

Marigolds prefer full sunlight and reasonably fertile soil. Although marigolds can be planted from seed, starter plants are inexpensive and readily available at most garden centers. Although an annual, marigold will often reseed itself in favourable conditions, or the gardener can easily collect seeds for future germination. Established plants will need to be thinned, and flowers should be dead-headed to promote additional blooms.

Potted marigolds can be positioned near entrances to your home and any common mosquito entry points, such as open windows. The smell may deter mosquitoes from going past this barrier. While marigolds can be used as border plants around the patio, we do not advise putting marigolds on the patio table since the bright blooms may attract wasps.

Besides repelling mosquitoes, marigolds repel insects which prey on tomato plants, so you may want to plant a few marigolds in your tomato bed for added protection.

4. Ageratum

AgeratumAlso known as Flossflowers, Ageratum emits a smell which mosquitos find particularly offensive. Ageratum secretes coumarin, which is widely used in commercial mosquito repellents.

Ageratum is a low-lying annual ornamental plant which reaches heights of 8 – 18”, and is easily recognized by its blue flowers, although there are varieties with pink, white and violet blooms. This plant will thrive in full or partial sun and does not require rich soil. It is often displayed in rock gardens where low-lying plants are favoured.

Although the leaves of Ageratum can be crushed to increase the emitted odor, it is not advisable to rub the crushed leaves directly on the skin.

5. Catnip

CatnipCatnip is a natural mosquito repellent. In August 2010, entomologists at Iowa State University reported to the American Chemical Society that catnip is ten times more effective than DEET, the chemical found in most commercial insect repellents. According to Iowa State researcher Chris Peterson, the reason for its effectiveness is still unknown. “It might simply be acting as an irritant or they don’t like the smell. But nobody really knows why insect repellents work.”

In the laboratory, Peterson put groups of 20 mosquitoes in a two-foot glass tube, half of which was treated with nepetalactone, a biologically active characteristic constituent of catnip. After 10 minutes, only an average of 20 percent – about four mosquitoes – remained on the side of the tube treated with a high dose (1.0%) of the oil. In the low dose test (0.1%) an average of 25% – five mosquitoes – stayed on the treated side. When the same tests were conducted using DEET (diethyl-meta-toluamide), approximately 40 to 45% – eight to nine mosquitoes – remained on the treated side. A ten-fold higher concentration of DEET was required to obtain results similar to those of the Catnip.

Catnip, Nepeta cateria, is very easy to grow. This perennial herb is related to mint, and grows readily both as a weed and a commercially cultivated plant in most areas of the US.

While catnip will repel mosquitoes in close proximity to the plant, some people apply crushed catnip leaves or catnip oil for more robust protection. Bear in mind, however, that cats will respond to you similarly as they would respond to the plant itself. Cat owners may want to choose an alternative plant for repelling mosquitoes.

While the plants mentioned in this article have been shown to have mosquito-repelling properties, there are environmental variables that can mitigate their effectiveness. A breeze may direct odors in the opposite direction if advancing mosquitoes, reducing the plant’s effectiveness. New formulations of non-toxic mosquito repellents are commercially available, and are advised for people who want to enjoy the outdoors without the annoyance of persistent mosquitoes.

Visit Eartheasy’s online store to buy non-toxic pest control and mosquito repellent products.

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30414
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Plants for non - food survival uses
« Reply #20 on: May 20, 2013, 02:15:54 PM »
To the Reader: This article caught my eye. This is about non food uses of natural organic cold-pressed coconut oil. They post a disclaimer on every item of use that, "Not enough ratings to generate accurate Rank and Score. Please help and rate this now."
That said, these uses make sense to me, and I feel these are worth a try. - Yowbarb
...

posted by virgovegan 8,000 Views

http://www.fasttopten.com/list/top-ten-uses-for-coconut-oil-other-than-cooking

10 Deodorant 
•   Most of the reason that we have body odor is from bacteria growing on our skin.  Coconut oil has antibacterial properties so applying it as deodorant works wonders. 
•   Store-bought antiperspirants and deodorants contain aluminum (which although has not been 100% proven) may contribute to Alzheimer's, breast cancer and other diseases.  Even if you don't buy that, store bought deodarnts and antipersperants contain many other toxic chemicals that many people want to avoid.
•   Coconut oil melts at is just 76 degrees.  Adding baking soda and cornstarch will give it a thicker consistency, but you may still want to keep it in the refrigerator during warmer months! Mix together 1/4 cup each baking soda and cornstarch and 1/3 cup of coconut oil.  Mix well then store in a jar with a tight lid or transfer to an empty deodorant container.

9 Hair Conditioner
•   Whether you have frizzy curls or limp straight hair, coconut oil is a great hair and scalp treatment.  The same way it can nourish your skin, coconut oil can nourish your hair.  Apply a small amount (pea size for shoulder length hair) to washed hair then rinse.  Coconut oil makes a wonderful detangler as well.
•   If you apply a small amount as a leave-in treatment, coconut oil can defrizz and even hold curls.  You can also use it on straight hair as a leave-in treatment and it will hold your style.

8 Toothpaste
•   Many of the uses listed are for items that may be filled with toxic chemicals.  Toothpaste is no different.  Most toothpastes contain SLS or sodium laurel sulfate.  A recent study published in the Journal of The American College of Toxicology showed that concentrations as low as 0.5% of SLS could cause irritation and concentrations of 10-30% SLS caused skin corrosion and severe irritation.  Sounds like SLS is something to avoid.
•   We use a solution of 1 part Dr. Bronners peppermint liquid soap to 5 parts of coconut oil.  Store in a jaro or in a pastry bag with a piping tip and apply to your toothbrush brushing as normal.

7 Lip Balm
•   Many lip balms on the market contain petroleum by-products which actually dry the skin rather than moisturize.  Coconut oil can prevent chapping and help moisturize lips.  You can use it just straight from the jar, or make your own lip balm with a few simple ingredients.  The below makes about 8 tubes of lip balm.
•   Melt the below ingredients and mix together:
•   1 Tablespoon Coconut Oil
•   2 Tablespoons Sunflower Oil
•   1 Tablespoon & 1 teaspoon Beeswax
•   Pour into lip balm tubs and let cool.

6 Makeup Remover

•   Coconut oil is a great moisturizing make-up remover.  Simply apply coconut oil to a cotton ball and wipe over eye makeup, and the rest of the face.  Wash your face again as you normally would, or just leave the coconut oil on your face for an added moisturizing treatment.  No need to mix anything in with the coconut oil, just apply straight from the jar onto the cotton ball and wipe away all that makeup.  Coconut oil can remove the toughest of make-up including mascara.  It is gentle on the face and in delicate areas of the face, like the eyes.

5 Lubricant
•   Many couples use store bought chemically based lubricants.  Coconut oil is natural, inexpensive and if you can use it for all these other things, why not use it for lubricant. 
•   While it is solid in the jar and below 76 degrees, when it is warmed, it easily dissolves into the skin.  Coconut oil is harmless to the tender tissues of the vagina and has antiviral and antibacterial properties that can be beneficial.  Somehow coconut oil kills the bad bacteria but does not harm the beneficial bacteria in the body.  Another advantage is that coconut oil is completely edible and pleasant tasting.  I won't go into detail why this is an advantage to other store bought chemical lubricants.
•   Do be mindful though that oil of any sort is incompatible with latex and should not be used with diaphragms or condoms.

4 Moisturizer
•   Coconut oil can be applied topically to the skin to use as a luxurious moisturizer.  It is solid when kept cold, but melts at room temperature and to the touch.  Reach into a jar and apply to the skin.  Coconut oil quickly absorbs into the skin.  Coconut oil has antioxidant properties as well which can help prevent aging and wrinkles.
Many of the skin products sold in stores have coconut oil as a main ingredient.  Rather than purchase a product with lots of additives and chemicals, skip all those excess ingredients and use 100% coconut oil.

3 Cradle Cap Remedy
•   If your infant or child develops cradle cap, there is an underlying issue that needs to be dealt with.  Cradle cap is a fungal infection usually due to an imbalance in internal yeast and bacteria.  To soothe baby's head while you deal with the underlying issue, you can use coconut oil.  Gently work the coconut oil into baby's scalp.  Work it into the scalp well, and gently ( it is important to remember that your baby still has a soft head).  Now, take a fine toothed baby comb and use it to gently remove the flakes.  This will take a few times to get rid of it all.  If the underlying issue is dealt with, this will be gone, and you won't have to deal with it again.  If cradle cap comes back, then see a natural minded doctor for help with dealing with the internal issues.

2 Nursing Mama Cream
•   For mamas who nurse and have tender, cracked nipple tissue, coconut oil can not only be soothing, but also help to heal the cracked skin.  Not all nursing mothers experience cracked nipple skin, but for those who do, coconut oil can also help prevent thrush from getting into those cracks.
•   There is no need to add anything to the oil, just apply straight from the jar. If you or your baby have any sensitivities to coconut though, you would want to avoid this application since it will be ingested by baby.

1 Sunscreen
•   There are many reasons not to use store bought sunscreen these days.  The biggest being that sunscreen blocks your body's ability to process the sun and make vitamin D (which is actually an enzyme we make, not a vitamin).  Mix one part shea butter, melted, into 2 parts of coconut oil and apply like any other sunscreen.  If you are more concerned about sun exposure, you can also add one part zinc oxide.  I am incredibly pale, live in the Sunshine state and have never had to add zinc oxide to prevent burning.

by virgovegan
.................




Endtimesgal_2012

  • Guest
Re: Plants for non - food survival uses
« Reply #21 on: May 20, 2013, 08:05:42 PM »
All great tips, thanks!

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30414
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Plants for non - food survival uses
« Reply #22 on: May 21, 2013, 03:09:18 AM »
All great tips, thanks!
I'm glad if they can help someone,
 :)

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30414
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Plants for non - food survival uses
« Reply #23 on: November 06, 2013, 01:15:21 PM »
Yowbarb Note: Some plants for dyeing cloth. We will start with onions...
...
Folk Fibers Blog  http://www.folkfibers.com/blogs/news

http://www.folkfibers.com/blogs/news/6652230-natural-dyes-yellow-onion-skins

Endtimesgal_2012

  • Guest
Re: Plants for non - food survival uses
« Reply #24 on: November 12, 2013, 07:46:18 AM »
Batb:  I love this post, the colors are beautiful and the directions are clear and concise.

Yowbarb

  • Administrator
  • Prolific Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30414
  • Karma: +25/-0
  • Reaching For Survival
Re: Plants for non - food survival uses
« Reply #25 on: November 12, 2013, 05:08:24 PM »
Batb:  I love this post, the colors are beautiful and the directions are clear and concise.

I'm glad U liked it.
I love the thought of dyeing clothing and blankets, etc. with natural colors...
Maybe in the Aftertimes this could come in useful...
 :)